Tj789
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So is all this right about transpiration?:

Transpiration is the loss of water by evaporation, from aerial parts of a plant (mainly the leaves)

How transpiration occurs:
Water moves into the leaves in the xylem, and moves to the spongy mesophyll cells by osmosis. The water evaporate on the surface of the spongy mesophyll cells and moves to the inter-cellular spaces between the spongy mesophyll cells. There are large air spaces between the spnogey mesophyll cells which help water vapor diffuse through the leaf tissue. As the water vapor accumulates inside the air spaces the water vapor potential rises in the leaf. When the water vapor potential in the leaf rises about the water vapor potential outside the leaf it diffuses out, down the water potential gradient.

So transpiration basically involves three stages:
  • Movement of water from xylem to mesophyll cells by osmosis
  • this water evaporates on the surface and moves to the intercellular spaces
  • diffuses out
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Lighfy
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(Original post by Tj789)
So is all this right about transpiration?:

Transpiration is the loss of water by evaporation, from aerial parts of a plant (mainly the leaves)

How transpiration occurs:
Water moves into the leaves in the xylem, and moves to the spongy mesophyll cells by osmosis. The water evaporate on the surface of the spongy mesophyll cells and moves to the inter-cellular spaces between the spongy mesophyll cells. There are large air spaces between the spnogey mesophyll cells which help water vapor diffuse through the leaf tissue. As the water vapor accumulates inside the air spaces the water vapor potential rises in the leaf. When the water vapor potential in the leaf rises about the water vapor potential outside the leaf it diffuses out, down the water potential gradient.

So transpiration basically involves three stages:
  • Movement of water from xylem to mesophyll cells by osmosis
  • this water evaporates on the surface and moves to the intercellular spaces
  • diffuses out
Correct
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Tj789
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(Original post by Lighfy)
Correct
Tanx!
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coolgamer
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That's wats in the textbook...
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Jmedi
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Yes correct!
I also urge you to consider/revise the factors that will change the rate of transpiration.
It's common to be asked about and explain them. I can write them here but there should be a good explanation of the factors in your textbook.
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