ps1265A
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1) Say if I'm considering the synapse between a sensory neurone and intermediate neurone. The definition of a synapse is the point when the axon of one neurone meets the dendrite of another. I don't understand why it's axon-dendrite, shouldn't it be two dendrites?

2) When nerve impulses are passed from one neurone to another, is the order ALWAYS sensory -> intermediate -> motor? Can a sensory neurone pass an impulse to another sensory neurone?

3) Does every receptor have it's OWN neuronal pathway that is used every time an action potential is propagated in that sensory neurone connecting the receptor?

4) Does each dendrite connect to MANY different nerve cells? I mean, if we have a sensory neurone, will it connect to like a millions of intermediate neurones because it has millions of dendrite?
If so, doesn't this conflict with the above question?


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Lighfy
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(Original post by ps1265A)
1) Say if I'm considering the synapse between a sensory neurone and intermediate neurone. The definition of a synapse is the point when the axon of one neurone meets the dendrite of another. I don't understand why it's axon-dendrite, shouldn't it be two dendrites?

2) When nerve impulses are passed from one neurone to another, is the order ALWAYS sensory -> intermediate -> motor? Can a sensory neurone pass an impulse to another sensory neurone?

3) Does every receptor have it's OWN neuronal pathway that is used every time an action potential is propagated in that sensory neurone connecting the receptor?

4) Does each dendrite connect to MANY different nerve cells? I mean, if we have a sensory neurone, will it connect to like a millions of intermediate neurones because it has millions of dendrite?
If so, doesn't this conflict with the above question?


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1) Think about the direction of transmission of an action potential. In sensory neurones, it is transmitted from the receptor to the dendrites, and crosses a synapse to generate an action potential in the axon terminal of the next neurone.

2) I'd imagine that it is sensory -> intermediate -> motor, because sensory neurones have receptors which only detect energy changes in the environment, unless they have sodium ion channels which allow them to generate action potentials (not too sure about this one).

3) If I'm understanding the question properly, both yes and no. Certain neurones may converge at the same synapse to help generate an action potential in the post-synaptic neurone. Others may have their own pathway and undergo "temporal summation" instead.

4) Kind of answered this in part 3.

Hope this can come of some use to you
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HenryHiddler
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(Original post by ps1265A)
1) Say if I'm considering the synapse between a sensory neurone and intermediate neurone. The definition of a synapse is the point when the axon of one neurone meets the dendrite of another. I don't understand why it's axon-dendrite, shouldn't it be two dendrites?

2) When nerve impulses are passed from one neurone to another, is the order ALWAYS sensory -> intermediate -> motor? Can a sensory neurone pass an impulse to another sensory neurone?

3) Does every receptor have it's OWN neuronal pathway that is used every time an action potential is propagated in that sensory neurone connecting the receptor?

4) Does each dendrite connect to MANY different nerve cells? I mean, if we have a sensory neurone, will it connect to like a millions of intermediate neurones because it has millions of dendrite?
If so, doesn't this conflict with the above question?


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1) Just want to clear something up - you can also get dendrite-dendrite synapses, called a dendrodendritic synapse, so you might be getting dendrite-dendrite transmission. Axodendritic synapses are the ones conventionally taught.

Hope this helps
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