AQA History AS level exemplar answers and answering questions Watch

aemlawstudent
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#21
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(Original post by humar)
Thanks I am just a bit worried about history cause you have to remember so much and plus I have other exams coming up as well in may. How long did it take you to revise?
I know, I worried so much for my history exams! One of which clashed with another exam, so I had two exams consecutively which was very stressful. It's very easy to feel overwhelmed by the detail that is expected, I find that especially with the A2 exam. Erm, I'm not entirely sure how much exactly, but I'm very much a panic reviser so I do quite intense revision in the two weeks leading up to the exam. I largely just read over my notes, condense it down and write lots of essays off it. I'd say just ensure you're organised with notes/resources a month before and you'll be fine.
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tss222
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Would someone mind giving my 12 mark answer a quick read and offereing any help. Im absolutly desperate im resitting the exam and need an A ( I failed last year) so any advice would be really useful.
Thanks so much.


Explain why there were rebellions against Richard III in 1483.

Richard III’s reign was marred by rebellion from its opening moments, rapidly losing support from the public predominantly as an outcome of his brutal usurpation, but equally resulting from the lack of southern support and the loss of loyalty from his closest confidant Buckingham. Each reason sparking small rebellions in 1483 and resulting in instability throughout Richard III’s reign.
Rebellion principally sparked from Richard III’s brutal usurpation of the throne in 1483, despite Edward IV having a legitimate heir, who despite his young age had rightful claim as successor to the throne. Yet, Richards’s desperation for power in the following months of his death led him to brutally seizing power, whilst neglecting to gain the public’s support he needed in order to retain a strong reign. The most predominant example of Richard’s brutality being processed in the rumours of the Princes in the Tower, in which it was increasingly believed Edward IV’s son to have been murdered in the tower despite being the heir. This is arguably the cause of each rebellion across 1483, since the public had no faith in the King.
Moreover, the pursuing progress of the King in the following months of his accession to the throne, is similarly a reason for the widespread rebellions in the south in 1483, whilst remaining an outcome of his poor usurpation, as historian Horrox suggests, believing the sporadic outcomes across London being an attempt to free the princes in the tower. Furthermore, the attempts during Richards’s absence highlight his unpopularity and the belief of his weakness as a king, supported by the spread of the rebellions southwards.
Finally, the loss of the support of his closest confidant Buckingham in 1483, is equally a key reason for rebellion, principally due to the ensuing Buckingham Rebellion. The loss of support further underlines his unpopularity and mistakes in usurpation leading to rebellion, as even his closest confidant lost support and has been variably suggested to link to Buckingham’s ill conscience towards the actions of the Princes in the Tower.
Overall, it is clear that the outbursts of rebellions in 1483 was the direct result of Richard’s III poor and brutal usurpation of the throne which prevented the formation of support from the public and led to him being an unpopular leader, thus sparking continuous rebellion in 1483.
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tss222
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HEY,
Would somone mind giving my essay a quick read and telling where you think I could improve I struggle so much with history and I am resitting the paper ( I dont think I will improve but I really need an A)
Would be super grateful and happy to help anyone else with questions about the last paper.
Thanks
How important was foreign support in enabling Henry Tudor to overthrow Richard III in 1485?
Foreign support had a defined role in enabling Henry Tudor to overthrow Richard II before and during the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, however in comparison to the mistakes of Richard III and his own dwindling support, the extent of which foreign support was important to Henry Tudor is negligible.
Some might argue that Henry Tudors placement in exile in Britanny for fourteen years, primarily underlines foreign support as immediately an advantage for Tudor, due to the support from the great power of France in his invasion. Tudor would have been unable to complete his invasion without the foreign support of KIng Charles VIII, in which he was offered 6,000 francs and 1,800 mercenaries in order to fight, thus improving his power in comparison to Richard’s 15,000 men. However, in comparison to the economic problems in Britain, an outcome of elaborate schemes of defence and failure of war in Scotland, the importance of foreign support is undermined, as Richard III was already significantly weakened by a lack of funds, therefore was already unable to form equally skilled fighters.
Tudor’s influence in France due to his long duration spent living there and ability to plan with loyal and trusted friends, of which successfully aided in the usurpation of Richard III, similarly highlights the importance of foreign support. For example the key role of the Earl of Oxford who led the attack at Bosworth and many supporters who fled Richard’s reign to support Tudor in Britanny, suggests a long term aid to his attack. Conversely, Tudor’s familial links to the influential Lord Stanley in Wales, through his mother’s marriage, highlights the native support that remained, despite the factor remaining limited due to Stanley’s aversion to choosing a side. The link remains significant as it created widespread support across south wales which enabled Tudor to land safely and progress to the battlefield whilst gaining an increase in support, without this Tudor may have faced continuous scruples weakening his attack at Bosworth.
However, despite Richard III having a greater number of soldiers the significance of the 1,800 mercenaries led by Chandee, during the Battle of Bosworth, underlines to some extent the importance of foreign support. Chandee’s expertise and use of tactics including the firing of the long bow, may have played a great role in the defeat of Richard. However, the evidence is limited in comparison to the turn of Sir William Stanley in the final defining moments, murdering Richard III and showing support towards Tudor. This portends that due to Richard’s poor reign with a lack of public support, nobility was not fully supportive of Richard and foresaw the benefits of aiding Tudor, therefore marking Richard’s flaws as the key to enabling Henry Tudor to overthrow Richard.
Overall, it is clear the importance of foreign support and the importance of native support are very closely interlinked, often one factor developing the impact of another, for example the weakness of Richard III’s economy in comparison to the 6,000 francs donated by Charles VIII to Tudor. Yet, it is still strongly arguable that the importance of foreign support remains marginable in comparison to problems in Britain which ultimately enabled the success of Tudor.
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katinthehat
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Can somebody help me with regards to sources? Basically, in my GCSE's I had it burnt into my brain when doing source questions to TAP (Time Audience Purpose) them. However, these source questions, you are only asked to compare similarities and differences. As if automatic, I include TAP points in my paragraph, and whilst my current teacher says it is a good skill I never get any marks for it! So do I really not need to worry about it and just focus on comparison and my own knowledge, or does tapping actually get you the marks? I switched exam boards (OCR GCSE to AQA A-level) so this might be why but if someone could just put my mind at rest that would be great!
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katinthehat
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#25
(Original post by tss222)
Would someone mind giving my 12 mark answer a quick read and offereing any help. Im absolutly desperate im resitting the exam and need an A ( I failed last year) so any advice would be really useful.
Thanks so much.


Explain why there were rebellions against Richard III in 1483.

Richard III’s reign was marred by rebellion from its opening moments, rapidly losing support from the public predominantly as an outcome of his brutal usurpation, but equally resulting from the lack of southern support and the loss of loyalty from his closest confidant Buckingham. Each reason sparking small rebellions in 1483 and resulting in instability throughout Richard III’s reign.
Rebellion principally sparked from Richard III’s brutal usurpation of the throne in 1483, despite Edward IV having a legitimate heir, who despite his young age had rightful claim as successor to the throne. Yet, Richards’s desperation for power in the following months of his death led him to brutally seizing power, whilst neglecting to gain the public’s support he needed in order to retain a strong reign. The most predominant example of Richard’s brutality being processed in the rumours of the Princes in the Tower, in which it was increasingly believed Edward IV’s son to have been murdered in the tower despite being the heir. This is arguably the cause of each rebellion across 1483, since the public had no faith in the King.
Moreover, the pursuing progress of the King in the following months of his accession to the throne, is similarly a reason for the widespread rebellions in the south in 1483, whilst remaining an outcome of his poor usurpation, as historian Horrox suggests, believing the sporadic outcomes across London being an attempt to free the princes in the tower. Furthermore, the attempts during Richards’s absence highlight his unpopularity and the belief of his weakness as a king, supported by the spread of the rebellions southwards.
Finally, the loss of the support of his closest confidant Buckingham in 1483, is equally a key reason for rebellion, principally due to the ensuing Buckingham Rebellion. The loss of support further underlines his unpopularity and mistakes in usurpation leading to rebellion, as even his closest confidant lost support and has been variably suggested to link to Buckingham’s ill conscience towards the actions of the Princes in the Tower.
Overall, it is clear that the outbursts of rebellions in 1483 was the direct result of Richard’s III poor and brutal usurpation of the throne which prevented the formation of support from the public and led to him being an unpopular leader, thus sparking continuous rebellion in 1483.
Hey, I think you've written a decent answer here, on a scale of marks I'd say maybe 10 so you're on a good track. However, I'll give you a few structural tips to make sure you're hitting top marks:
  • THREE FACTORS! You don't need to write an introduction, but what is crucial is including three different factors that directly relate to the question. In each of these paragraphs, you should include:
    • a) the factor (Rebellion principally sparked from Richard III’s brutal usurpation of the throne in 1483)
    • b) evidence to support the factor (despite Edward IV having had a legitimate heir, Edward V, who, despite his young age in spite of not being able to ascend to the throne at 12 years of age , had rightful claim as successor)
    • c) explanation (This caused outrage, as Edward IV's line of succession had been interrupted - some people believed Richard did not have true claim to the throne.)

  • ​Where I've added in red, I don't know if you can notice, how significantly more factual it sounds? Examiners are lazy and are simply searching for those who hit the criteria they're marking against, and doing it in a formulaic manner such as this makes it easier for them to spot it. All in the technique
  • Here's what one of your three paragraphs should look like:
    • Rebellion principally sparked from Richard III’s brutal usurpation of the throne in 1483. Edward IV had a legitimate heir, Edward V, who, in spite of not being able to ascend to the throne at 12 years of age , had rightful claim as successor. This caused outrage, as Edward IV's line of succession had been interrupted - some people believed Richard did not have true claim to the throne.

  • It may seem like you're having to explain what should come as an obvious conclusion, but the examiner doesn't know that, so explain away, as that's what the question's asking you!
  • LINKING THE FACTORS. Which you've done really (Overall, it is clear that the outbursts of rebellions in 1483 was the direct result of Richard’s III poor and brutal usurpation of the throne which prevented the formation of support from the public and led to him being an unpopular leader, thus sparking continuous rebellion in 1483.) So that doesn't really need elaborating, apart from ensuring you tie up the end with something which links your three factors together
  • Quick Tip: The examiner is literally looking for three factors (PEE'd) and a link. So, whilst you're historiography is lovely, you should save it for the 24 marker as you'll get marks for it there where you won't in the 12! Due to the ridiculous time constraints of this exam, you'll be wanting to save every minute you can!


The most important thing with this exam is being precise. Precise evidence is definitely the difference between an A and a B.

Good luck! Hope this helped in some way!
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amyhitch
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#26
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#26
(Original post by aemlawstudent)
Hi,

I did AQA AS history last year where, like you, I studied HIS2M. While I don't have any exemplar essays I wrote saved (that I'm aware of, I will look) or 'official' resources for this module, I typed my notes (from text books, sources etc.) into a word document which I used to formulate essays and for general revision. I can send you this if you wish and you can see if you find it helpful as to how I structured out topics within HIS2M :-) It might be worth a look, even if it's not your style of revision, as it was what aided me to achieving 100% at AS!


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Hey, i'm doing the same history courses as what i gather you studied? Is there any chance you have any revision sources or any tips? I'm finding it really hard in all honesty,

Thanks in advance!
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aemlawstudent
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(Original post by amyhitch)
Hey, i'm doing the same history courses as what i gather you studied? Is there any chance you have any revision sources or any tips? I'm finding it really hard in all honesty,

Thanks in advance!
Tsarist Russia and Nazi Germany? If so, then yes, that's what I studied for AS. For resources, I composed my revision/notes from the AQA and 'my revision notes' textbooks (plus worksheets my teacher handed out). So I only really have the word documents I formulated from these to show - you can have these if you'd like? They may or may not be helpful to you... In terms of tips, just get organised with revision and ensure you have your notes clearly set out and done with time beforehand - then practise/plan essays. I found it really quite hard also. Honestly, try not to worry too much - I only really mastered the content a few weeks before the exam and thought I'd be pushing for a B!


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amyhitch
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#28
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#28
(Original post by aemlawstudent)
Tsarist Russia and Nazi Germany? If so, then yes, that's what I studied for AS. For resources, I composed my revision/notes from the AQA and 'my revision notes' textbooks (plus worksheets my teacher handed out). So I only really have the word documents I formulated from these to show - you can have these if you'd like? They may or may not be helpful to you... In terms of tips, just get organised with revision and ensure you have your notes clearly set out and done with time beforehand - then practise/plan essays. I found it really quite hard also. Honestly, try not to worry too much - I only really mastered the content a few weeks before the exam and thought I'd be pushing for a B!


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Hey, yeah they are my exact topics. Yes if possible, that would be fantastic, i am dreading history so much! What other a levels do you do??
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tss222
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#29
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#29
(Original post by katinthehat)
Hey, I think you've written a decent answer here, on a scale of marks I'd say maybe 10 so you're on a good track. However, I'll give you a few structural tips to make sure you're hitting top marks:
  • THREE FACTORS! You don't need to write an introduction, but what is crucial is including three different factors that directly relate to the question. In each of these paragraphs, you should include:
    • a) the factor (Rebellion principally sparked from Richard III’s brutal usurpation of the throne in 1483)
    • b) evidence to support the factor (despite Edward IV having had a legitimate heir, Edward V, who, despite his young age in spite of not being able to ascend to the throne at 12 years of age , had rightful claim as successor)
    • c) explanation (This caused outrage, as Edward IV's line of succession had been interrupted - some people believed Richard did not have true claim to the throne.)

  • ​Where I've added in red, I don't know if you can notice, how significantly more factual it sounds? Examiners are lazy and are simply searching for those who hit the criteria they're marking against, and doing it in a formulaic manner such as this makes it easier for them to spot it. All in the technique
  • Here's what one of your three paragraphs should look like:
    • Rebellion principally sparked from Richard III’s brutal usurpation of the throne in 1483. Edward IV had a legitimate heir, Edward V, who, in spite of not being able to ascend to the throne at 12 years of age , had rightful claim as successor. This caused outrage, as Edward IV's line of succession had been interrupted - some people believed Richard did not have true claim to the throne.

  • It may seem like you're having to explain what should come as an obvious conclusion, but the examiner doesn't know that, so explain away, as that's what the question's asking you!
  • LINKING THE FACTORS. Which you've done really (Overall, it is clear that the outbursts of rebellions in 1483 was the direct result of Richard’s III poor and brutal usurpation of the throne which prevented the formation of support from the public and led to him being an unpopular leader, thus sparking continuous rebellion in 1483.) So that doesn't really need elaborating, apart from ensuring you tie up the end with something which links your three factors together
  • Quick Tip: The examiner is literally looking for three factors (PEE'd) and a link. So, whilst you're historiography is lovely, you should save it for the 24 marker as you'll get marks for it there where you won't in the 12! Due to the ridiculous time constraints of this exam, you'll be wanting to save every minute you can!


The most important thing with this exam is being precise. Precise evidence is definitely the difference between an A and a B.

Good luck! Hope this helped in some way!

Thanks so much that has been really useful, I think thats the best explanation I have had of how to do it so far.

Good Luck with your exams
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tss222
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#30
(Original post by katinthehat)

Good luck! Hope this helped in some way!
Could I send you a 24 marker, if its not too annoying for extra help?
Thanks
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katinthehat
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(Original post by tss222)
Could I send you a 24 marker, if its not too annoying for extra help?
Thanks
Hey, good luck to you too! And please send away, it helps me too to read through other people's answers and add to my own knowledge
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tss222
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(Original post by katinthehat)
Hey, good luck to you too! And please send away, it helps me too to read through other people's answers and add to my own knowledge
How successful was Henry VII in consolidating royal authority in the years 1485-1509 ? (24 marks)
The success of Henry VII in his consolidation of royal authority was enforced from the opening moments of his reign. The marriage to Elizabeth of York presented the Tudor dynasty as having a legitimate claim to the throne and a reconciliation of the warring houses of Lancaster and York, thus presenting an end to the War of the Roses. However, the success of the symbolism in disguising Henry VII from being viewed as a usurper was underplayed by the pursuing Yorkist threats, most significantly Lambert Simnel’s attempt at impersonating a Yorkist Prince. The threat ultimately developed into the Battle of Stoke and conveyed that Yorkist support still strongly remained, a failure of Henry’s authority. Yet, the defeat of the rebels conveyed power and arguably symbolized the final battle of the War of the Roses, thus implicating another success in propaganda for Henry VII.
Additionally, Henry VII’s management of financial policies similary played an evident role is consolidating royal authority. Under Henry’s management royal income increased to £120,000 per annun in 1509, in comparison to the £90,000 in 1483. Henry increased revenues across the land, to create profit and stability within the dynasty. This acted as security for his reign as the king could summon a large army to any threat, thus conveyed power. The two outbursts of rebellion based on resentment from taxes in 1489 and 1497 suggest otherwise. Most significantly, the 1497 Cornish Rebellion resulted from forced taxes for a war in Scotland, creating resentment with citizens and led to an uprising against Henry’s oppressive methods. Yet, whilst a threat the rebellion did not destabilize Henry VII’s regime and alternatively highlights his rigorous and thorough approach to increasing revenue.
Most significantly, the securing of foreign policy during his reign increasingly consolidated royal authority. For example, the Treaty of Etaples with France in 1492, dissolved the threat of a dangerous war with a powerful country, whilst increasing Crown income with the terms adding 50,000 crowns per annun to revenues, presenting Henry’s skill at negotiation and power as a leader. Although, the need of a treaty highlights the foreign problems Henry faced in the opening of his reign, remaining inexperienced and weak, the treaty was further significant in the prevention of harbouring of imposters in France, following the threat of Perkin Warbeck and acted as a precursor for similar relations across Europe.
Overall, the success of Henry VII in consolidating royal authority throughout his reign, is clear due to his firm control of power and reconciliation of the War of the Roses. Although, Henry VII faced numerous problems, including Yorkist imposters and rebellions, his response and following actions presented him as a powerful King.


I struggled a bit with the question but tried to incorperate the more factual PEE structure this time.
Thank you so much for the help.
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efran
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#33
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#33
anyone who did HIS1B in 2014 what were the questions??
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Lillz563
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WOULD U BE ABLE TO SEND ME THIS? PLEASE??
plssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss sssssssssssssssss i need help
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JoeMill500
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#35
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#35
(Original post by aemlawstudent)
Hi,

I did AQA AS history last year where, like you, I studied HIS2M. While I don't have any exemplar essays I wrote saved (that I'm aware of, I will look) or 'official' resources for this module, I typed my notes (from text books, sources etc.) into a word document which I used to formulate essays and for general revision. I can send you this if you wish and you can see if you find it helpful as to how I structured out topics within HIS2M :-) It might be worth a look, even if it's not your style of revision, as it was what aided me to achieving 100% at AS!


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Can you send term to me please
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