Are you eligible to vote in the general election but not going to vote? If so why? Watch

username1697607
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I was just wondering what people's excuses for not voting are, I feel pretty strongly that people should vote but have always been curious as to why people don't!
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Xin Xang
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I don't think that people are interested to be honest.

We have been raised to believe that politics is something grown ups talk about, and most simply don't grow out of this phase until very late on.

We should introduce politics early on in the education system.

We should have an entire hour each week devoted to it. Just as the PSHCE lessons were implemented.
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Choppie
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I really do hope people don't use the "they [the parties] are all the same!" argument. That is simply untrue - which the smallest amount of research shows.
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zebby1999
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I was watching a debate: Big Questions.

They mentioned that some 18-30 year olds feel as if they don't vote because there isn't a party that represents them and MPs aren't trustworthy due to all the media coverage of funds being misused and whatnot. However, there was a counter argument presented that stated: If they don't vote, why should MPs be compelled to stand up for their views...

You get my drift.

Anyway, I'm 16 so...
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username1697607
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(Original post by Choppie)
I really do hope people don't use the "they [the parties] are all the same!" argument. That is simply untrue - which the smallest amount of research shows.
That's the exact argument I'm waiting for. most young people are so apathetic when it comes to voting, they don't vote yet feel they have the right to riot when tuition fees are increased. It's total bloody madness!
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Choppie
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(Original post by zebby1999)
I was watching a debate: Big Questions.

They mentioned that some 18-30 year olds feel as if they don't vote because there isn't a party that represents them and MPs aren't trustworthy due to all the media coverage of funds being misused and whatnot. However, there was a counter argument presented that stated: If they don't vote, why should MPs be compelled to stand up for their views...

You get my drift.

Anyway, I'm 16 so...
I have always seen the Liberal Democrats or the Greens as good parties to vote for if you're a student or young adult. They have policies aimed at young adults, and will help them become independent from parents.

(Original post by Zachary T-H)
That's the exact argument I'm waiting for. most young people are so apathetic when it comes to voting, they don't vote yet feel they have the right to riot when tuition fees are increased. It's total bloody madness!
Yep. The thing that gets me with this argument is the show of ignorance it has on that person. Voting should be taken seriously, and people should research a party to find one that fits them best. If the voter finds that no party fits them at all, two options prevail: create your own party, or spoil your ballot. I am sure that, if the "one million students" that the media reports aren't voting submitted a spoiled ballot, it would give the parties a shock.
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zebby1999
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(Original post by Choppie)
I have always seen the Liberal Democrats or the Greens as good parties to vote for if you're a student or young adult. They have policies aimed at young adults, and will help them become independent from parents.



Yep. The thing that gets me with this argument is the show of ignorance it has on that person. Voting should be taken seriously, and people should research a party to find one that fits them best. If the voter finds that no party fits them at all, two options prevail: create your own party, or spoil your ballot. I am sure that, if the "one million students" that the media reports aren't voting submitted a spoiled ballot, it would give the parties a shock.
Sorry, this has caught my interest. What's a spoiled ballot?
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Choppie
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(Original post by zebby1999)
Sorry, this has caught my interest. What's a spoiled ballot?
Basically where you cast your vote without indicating a party on the slip, but instead scribbling on the ballot paper, or writing some message (eg, "No suitable candidate").

These spoiled ballots will be included in the overall count, and it can be seen how many people are dissatisfied with the current parties. Simply not voting does not achieve this, as there are many reasons behind why someone didn't vote (eg, they couldn't get to a polling station in time, or had an accident), and so it can't be said that just because someone didn't vote means they wouldn't if they could.

It may also be worth mentioning that you should never sign your ballot paper. This may sound obvious, but signed ballots are rejected when it comes to counting, as revealing your identity breaches the rules of secret ballot. Unfortunately, some people still tend to sign them for one reason or another.
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Laomedeia
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(Original post by Zachary T-H)
I was just wondering what people's excuses for not voting are, I feel pretty strongly that people should vote but have always been curious as to why people don't!
Im not gonna vote. Choosing between the shower of schit that want to run this country is a bit like choosing which disease you would most like to die of.
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Comeback
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I think it's ridiculous some people aren't voting.

If no party represents you, do something about it. Too lazy? Then just vote for the lesser of evils, the party you dislike the least.

The 'my vote won't count anyway' argument is crazy too. Your vote does matter (hopefully) to you and what you believe in. Maybe it won't change the election, or be remembered for decades after election day, but (possibly) neither will you. Yet you still want to live and be happy right? Even if humanity from a distance perspective doesn't notice you. Because you matter to yourself, your family/friends/etc. You don't need the world to recognize your uniqueness (but they might if you keep aiming high).

/rant
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RF_PineMarten
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I have registered to vote but I don't know if I'll vote or not.

One thing I absolutely cannot stand is the "if you don't vote you can't complain" line that inevitably gets dragged out at election time, and which I can already see in this thread. If there are no parties out there I can support enough to be able to vote for them, then I'm not going to vote. It's as simple as that. I have no interest in voting for a party I do not support just for the sake of voting and just so I can then complain. I can and will complain about issues that matter to me regardless of whether I voted in that election or not, and regardless of what the "don't vote, don't complain" crowd think of it.

There are other things you can do if there are certain issues you care about. You could join a campaign organisation. You can lobby your MP. You could ask your local candidates about those issues and report back on it - to help other people make a decision even if you yourself can't (I think some campaign groups are doing this). Even just writing a letter to a newspaper can raise some awareness, and it's easy to do now we have computers and internet. The only ones where the "can't complain" argument really applies are the ones who do nothing at all about issues they care about.

Ideally I'd like to spoil my ballot instead of not voting. With a spoiled ballot you obviously turned up to vote, so that's clearly not laziness. It shows that you are disillusioned but also politically active, and it's much better than not voting where you can't tell who's disillusioned and who's just lazy.
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RF_PineMarten
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(Original post by Xin Xang)
I don't think that people are interested to be honest.

We have been raised to believe that politics is something grown ups talk about, and most simply don't grow out of this phase until very late on.

We should introduce politics early on in the education system.

We should have an entire hour each week devoted to it. Just as the PSHCE lessons were implemented.
I was thinking of this as well.

Start in primary school with stuff like how different levels of government work, how elections work, how parliament works and how laws are passed (obviously don't pile it all on them at once, do it gradually and in an age appropriate way). A few years into secondary school start discussing political ideologies, party policies and actual political issues. Keep it compulsory through GCSE.
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username1697607
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(Original post by Laomedeia)
Im not gonna vote. Choosing between the shower of schit that want to run this country is a bit like choosing which disease you would most like to die of.
The reason young people get such a **** deal is because of attitudes like that, if you don't vote then you get no representation, simple as that. I do agree though, the candidates are poor, the only really capable politician at the moment is William Hague and he is resigning. It is worth voting though because that gives you a right to complain about the governments actions, i personally feel people have no right to complain about anything the government does if they don't vote
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username1697607
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(Original post by RFowler)
I have registered to vote but I don't know if I'll vote or not.

One thing I absolutely cannot stand is the "if you don't vote you can't complain" line that inevitably gets dragged out at election time, and which I can already see in this thread. If there are no parties out there I can support enough to be able to vote for them, then I'm not going to vote. It's as simple as that. I have no interest in voting for a party I do not support just for the sake of voting and just so I can then complain. I can and will complain about issues that matter to me regardless of whether I voted in that election or not, and regardless of what the "don't vote, don't complain" crowd think of it.

There are other things you can do if there are certain issues you care about. You could join a campaign organisation. You can lobby your MP. You could ask your local candidates about those issues and report back on it - to help other people make a decision even if you yourself can't (I think some campaign groups are doing this). Even just writing a letter to a newspaper can raise some awareness, and it's easy to do now we have computers and internet. The only ones where the "can't complain" argument really applies are the ones who do nothing at all about issues they care about.

Ideally I'd like to spoil my ballot instead of not voting. With a spoiled ballot you obviously turned up to vote, so that's clearly not laziness. It shows that you are disillusioned but also politically active, and it's much better than not voting where you can't tell who's disillusioned and who's just lazy.
I just used exactly the line you hate and then read your comment :rolleyes:

why don't you just work out which party best fulfills your self interest and then at least your making the most out of a bad situation?
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Cal-lum
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cus russel brand sed not 2.




....I'm joking. It's a mixture of voter apathy and lack of political education. As well as the government constantly being portrayed negatively by the media. Very rarely do you hear anyone speak positively about the government which is a pity really.
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RF_PineMarten
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(Original post by Zachary T-H)
I just used exactly the line you hate and then read your comment :rolleyes:

why don't you just work out which party best fulfills your self interest and then at least your making the most out of a bad situation?
That's what I try to do, and I'm well aware that no one can expect to support a party 100%. But when you have major issues with all the options that are big enough to make you not want to vote for any of them, voting for one of them just to keep out a different one you also don't support is just stupid. I would say that's the only way you can really "waste" a vote. In that situation the "don't vote, don't complain" line gets frustrating very quickly.

In some special cases (and only in these special cases) things might be different and I might be able to find a "least worst" option. e.g. I would be prepared to vote Labour to keep out a climate change denying Conservative candidate, as the environment is one of the things I am most concerned about. However, the chances of that happening are slim.
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RF_PineMarten
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(Original post by Cal-lum)
cus russel brand sed not 2.




....I'm joking. It's a mixture of voter apathy and lack of political education. As well as the government constantly being portrayed negatively by the media. Very rarely do you hear anyone speak positively about the government which is a pity really.
That's because there are a lot of disgusting things going on in parliament and in government which get media attention because they are unacceptable. e.g Conflicts of interest are a big issue with things like healthcare reforms. The amount of influence corporate interests have on politics is obscene.

When the government does something right, they don't often get praised for it because that is the standard they are supposed to work at anyway. Praising the government for managing something how they are supposed to is a bit like saying "look how wonderful these parents are, they don't throw their own children into the sea". They only get praised if they do something above and beyond that to deserve it, like Cameron getting gay marriage passed.
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ChaoticButterfly
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I'm not voting because I want to role over and take tuition fees up the ass. Harder Cameron! Harder!!!!!
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Xin Xang
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
I'm not voting because I want to role over and take tuition fees up the ass. Harder Cameron! Harder!!!!!
Funny.

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Decision11
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(Original post by RFowler)
I was thinking of this as well.

Start in primary school with stuff like how different levels of government work, how elections work, how parliament works and how laws are passed (obviously don't pile it all on them at once, do it gradually and in an age appropriate way). A few years into secondary school start discussing political ideologies, party policies and actual political issues. Keep it compulsory through GCSE.
Yeah I second this. People do need to be more aware.
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