Retail Skills that are useful for a career in Law?

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345423KNL
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Hey Guys!

I was wondering whether anyone could help me out. As most students and teenagers, I have worked almost exclusively in the retail sector however I am struggling to think of retail skills that I can put in my CV for a career in Law.

For example, from my retail experience, I have learnt interpersonal skills, How can I relate this to law?

Thanks
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Yazooo
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There are actually a lot of skills you could link to law.

Maybe you could be more specific though, as 'interpersonal skills' sounds too general. You could relate it to dealing with difficult customers or working under pressure?
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345423KNL
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(Original post by Yazooo)
There are actually a lot of skills you could link to law.

Maybe you could be more specific though, as 'interpersonal skills' sounds too general. You could relate it to dealing with difficult customers or working under pressure?
Hey! Thanks for replying!

So I've had to deal with working under pressure, how can I relate this to law (I know that you do have to work under pressure in law but how can I put this in coherent sentence?)
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Le Nombre
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It's customer service at the end of the day, we just call them clients instead. Show that you understand that people pay your bills because you provide a good service, only part of which us good advice, and you're ahead of many.
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Yazooo
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(Original post by 345423KNL)
Hey! Thanks for replying!

So I've had to deal with working under pressure, how can I relate this to law (I know that you do have to work under pressure in law but how can I put this in coherent sentence?)

Hmm...working under pressure in the context of law usually revolves around meeting urgent deadlines or handling a difficult client. Have you been in a position where you have had to meet a deadline or resolve a customer's problem or inquiry under pressure e.g. they might have been angry or in a rush? Because you could use this to highlight a couple of things: problem-solving, working under pressure and interpersonal skills (through dealing with difficult customer).
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345423KNL
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Ah okay thanks!
Do you think I should mention specific skills I used an examples where?


eg:
Employment History:

Retail Assistant, __________
-
Learnt importance of working under pressure when I had to serve multiple customers during peak trading hours
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345423KNL
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(Original post by G8D)
I don't think it's phrased well. Working under pressure isn't important. It's just something you have to cope with.
How would you phrase it or include it?
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typonaut
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What's "working under pressure" in a retail environment for a junior member of staff?
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50FtQueenie
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You can use to it demonstrate a good work ethic, team work and commercial awareness. I would say your retail experience will be particularly valuable in demonstrating an understanding of client care. Think about the times a customer has had a problem or was angry and has expected you to deal with it and find them a solution.

It will also demonstrate an ability to communicate with members of the public generally. Important if you're looking at firms that deal with individuals as clients.
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typonaut
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(Original post by J-SP)
If anyone has worked in retail during the Christmas/sales season, I bet they have worked under pressure. Might not be the same mental pressure as a client deadline in a law firm, but I praise anyone who can put up working with the hell of customers in situations like that.
But seriously, how long can it last - you get a bit of aggro from a customer for five minutes, you send them off to customer services or dump them on a manager... and at worst you might get two of those per day.
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Le Nombre
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(Original post by typonaut)
But seriously, how long can it last - you get a bit of aggro from a customer for five minutes, you send them off to customer services or dump them on a manager... and at worst you might get two of those per day.
I've worked in retail at Xmas. I am a trainee. No matter how much of a **** the client is being, they still depend on you to get the job done and are aware their ranting down the phone costs a serious amount. A customer doesn't have that issue and can be so much worse. If you can handle Xmas customers, you can handle demanding clients.
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(Original post by Le Nombre)
I've worked in retail at Xmas. I am a trainee. No matter how much of a **** the client is being, they still depend on you to get the job done and are aware their ranting down the phone costs a serious amount. A customer doesn't have that issue and can be so much worse. If you can handle Xmas customers, you can handle demanding clients.
I'm sorry, the two things just don't compare. Working in a shop with a difficult customer just demonstrates interpersonal skills - it is not pressure. Looking at it commercially (and a junior assistant in a shop is never going to do that), it's one customer in thousands that walk through a large store every day. You might wind them up with your attitude, but they are probably going to come back, because this is their local.

Having a problem with a client, who is spending thousands, or even tens of thousands, is an entirely different matter. Instead of having thousands of customers daily you've maybe a few dozen a year. And who says they're on the phone, they could be sitting in the boardroom waiting for you to come up with an answer.

That's pressure, not passing a difficult customer on to customer services.
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Le Nombre
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(Original post by typonaut)
I'm sorry, the two things just don't compare. Working in a shop with a difficult customer just demonstrates interpersonal skills - it is not pressure. Looking at it commercially (and a junior assistant in a shop is never going to do that), it's one customer in thousands that walk through a large store every day. You might wind them up with your attitude, but they are probably going to come back, because this is their local.

Having a problem with a client, who is spending thousands, or even tens of thousands, is an entirely different matter. Instead of having thousands of customers daily you've maybe a few dozen a year. And who says they're on the phone, they could be sitting in the boardroom waiting for you to come up with an answer.

That's pressure, not passing a difficult customer on to customer services.
But when someone's kicking off in law you can find an answer, and they either calm down or refuse to accept it, and i'd rather lose a client than tell the partner they need to contact the GC. They are spending hundreds of thousands, millions or even tens of millions, but people in those positions, whilst very demanding, won't scream in your face.

It might be less pressure I suppose, but I'd much prefer to have someone angry but rational whom I can sort out than someone irrational where I basically can't do anything to solve the issue.
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(Original post by Le Nombre)
But when someone's kicking off in law you can find an answer…
You must be really good that you can always find an answer.

Anyway, I'm not just talking about law, there are lots of other instances where you will find genuine pressure in a job - but I really doubt that a junior retail assistant is high on that list.
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Le Nombre
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(Original post by typonaut)
You must be really good that you can always find an answer.

Anyway, I'm not just talking about law, there are lots of other instances where you will find genuine pressure in a job - but I really doubt that a junior retail assistant is high on that list.
I certainly can't, but if something's standing in the way of a deal the whole team will be on it and it's very likely a solution will be found, albeit an expensive one.
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