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    I am attending an interview in a few days time at Brunel, and have to take with me my portfolio. The thing is, they haven't answered or even replied to any of my questions over the last couple weeks, and there is a slight concern I have. They only want 6 pages of work, but in the email I received they have stated 'one sheet could include many examples of your drawing work.' Do they mean by this that I can scan in a load of my work and just shrink it into one page? or by many examples do they just mean something like a page of design ideas? I know I've left it late, but any help would be great
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    Hey,
    I also have an interview at Brunel for product design engineering and I received the same email. Im pretty sure that when they say it could include many examples of your drawing work they mean many images shrunken onto the page. But I would stick to the same thing. So have the page with design ideas and don't mix it in with stuff like illustrator or computer work.
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    (Original post by Amaani.AA)
    Hey,
    I also have an interview at Brunel for product design engineering and I received the same email. Im pretty sure that when they say it could include many examples of your drawing work they mean many images shrunken onto the page. But I would stick to the same thing. So have the page with design ideas and don't mix it in with stuff like illustrator or computer work.
    Cheers. They actually replied today, this is what they said if it helps anyone else out:

    "Yes, it is all fine for you to include more than one piece of work in one sheet. You can condense multiple pages into one page if there is some relevance between the pieces you are putting together."
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    (Original post by makenzi)
    Cheers. They actually replied today, this is what they said if it helps anyone else out:

    "Yes, it is all fine for you to include more than one piece of work in one sheet. You can condense multiple pages into one page if there is some relevance between the pieces you are putting together."
    good luck with it and yeah that's what I thought
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    Good luck with the interviews guys I'm a Brunel designer currently on placement, but was a Design Ambassador last year. Any questions, then feel free to ask me
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    Hi,
    I've recieved my offer from Brunel for Industrial Desgin & Technology (BA) but i've been having a million second thoughts over whether I should've chosen the Product Design Engineering bSc course. Im worried that BA is too artsy and wont have enough of the electronics and actually getting products to work, and also that it wont be considered by some firms because its BA and not BEng or BSc.
    I'm also not really sure as to what the average designer does day to day (as a career) so if you could say where you work and what you do on a normal day it would be very much appreciated Im 100% on going to brunel I really like it but i'm just worried i'll choose the wrong course for myself and end up regretting it, any advice?

    (*Sorry for the essay lol)
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    (Original post by littlemissmidget123)
    Good luck with the interviews guys I'm a Brunel designer currently on placement, but was a Design Ambassador last year. Any questions, then feel free to ask me
    I have to complete a design task when i get to Brunel part of my interview. do you have any idea what it could be and what kind of questions are asked?
    thanks
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    (Original post by Amaani.AA)
    I have to complete a design task when i get to Brunel part of my interview. do you have any idea what it could be and what kind of questions are asked?
    thanks
    in answer to this its probably unfair if i tell you what youre likely to be doing (it might have changed from last year anyway), but practice your product analysis, and bring along a few drawing materials. the task itself is very easy, so dont worry about it too much, im sure youll be fine! The interviews are probably in groups, and mostly going through your folio, just prepare for the basic questions - why design, why brunel, fave designer etc.
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    (Original post by mbw_97)
    Hi,
    I've recieved my offer from Brunel for Industrial Desgin & Technology (BA) but i've been having a million second thoughts over whether I should've chosen the Product Design Engineering bSc course. Im worried that BA is too artsy and wont have enough of the electronics and actually getting products to work, and also that it wont be considered by some firms because its BA and not BEng or BSc.
    I'm also not really sure as to what the average designer does day to day (as a career) so if you could say where you work and what you do on a normal day it would be very much appreciated Im 100% on going to brunel I really like it but i'm just worried i'll choose the wrong course for myself and end up regretting it, any advice?

    (*Sorry for the essay lol)
    Quote me because im unlikely to see otherwise!

    Brunel's design ethos is generally to make products that work. all students are taught this, and there isa lot of cross over and group work between all the courses. My advice is to go with what style of learning suits you best..

    BA is quite a practical way of learning - has a slightly bigger focus on electronics than BSc (but its marginal)
    BSc Product Design (PD) is much more theoretical - with a bias towards the mechanical side of things (but again its marginal,a and both courses cover both mechanics and electronics)
    BSc Product Design Engineering (PDE) shares the first 2 years with the other BSc course, and only branches out in third year - PDE does CAD and more mechanics, PD does human factors (BA also have the option to do human factors, but not CAD) - there is the option to swap between these courses at the start of third year as long as your grades allow for it (I intend to move to PDE) - if youre worried you wont get the grades for PDE then apply for PD and look to transfer.

    There is also the possibility of going from BSc to BA early on in the course if you are finding the work too much, but be aware that going from BA to BSc is virtually impossible.

    Honestly I cant tell you what to decide, but you have to go with your gut feeling. All design degrees from brunel are equally as valid, and just because you might have a BA, it doesnt mean that you will be doing artsy things forever - in fact many BA students do highly technical things for their major project, placements and in their future careers (jobs are more about what you as an individual designer can bring to the team) - so if i was you, id be thinking, how do i learn - more hands on (BA), more theoretical (BSc). dont be thinking about future employment so much.

    in terms of what the average designer does.. thats a tough question. i'm on placement at the moment - and i work in a product design consultancy - so i design products - my boss does the initial process with taking on clients, and them i can be involved with anything from researching existing products/concepts, concept generation, CAD modeling, rendering concepts, makign prototypes/models, photography, presentation boards, report writing, sitting in on client meetings... honestly no two days are ever the same here!

    but design is a huge field and a product design degree could take you down so many different routes - it's really up to you to work out what you want to do long term - and placement really helps with that. any further questions then ask away
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    (Original post by littlemissmidget123)
    Quote me because im unlikely to see otherwise!

    Brunel's design ethos is generally to make products that work. all students are taught this, and there isa lot of cross over and group work between all the courses. My advice is to go with what style of learning suits you best..

    BA is quite a practical way of learning - has a slightly bigger focus on electronics than BSc (but its marginal)
    BSc Product Design (PD) is much more theoretical - with a bias towards the mechanical side of things (but again its marginal,a and both courses cover both mechanics and electronics)
    BSc Product Design Engineering (PDE) shares the first 2 years with the other BSc course, and only branches out in third year - PDE does CAD and more mechanics, PD does human factors (BA also have the option to do human factors, but not CAD) - there is the option to swap between these courses at the start of third year as long as your grades allow for it (I intend to move to PDE) - if youre worried you wont get the grades for PDE then apply for PD and look to transfer.

    There is also the possibility of going from BSc to BA early on in the course if you are finding the work too much, but be aware that going from BA to BSc is virtually impossible.

    Honestly I cant tell you what to decide, but you have to go with your gut feeling. All design degrees from brunel are equally as valid, and just because you might have a BA, it doesnt mean that you will be doing artsy things forever - in fact many BA students do highly technical things for their major project, placements and in their future careers (jobs are more about what you as an individual designer can bring to the team) - so if i was you, id be thinking, how do i learn - more hands on (BA), more theoretical (BSc). dont be thinking about future employment so much.

    in terms of what the average designer does.. thats a tough question. i'm on placement at the moment - and i work in a product design consultancy - so i design products - my boss does the initial process with taking on clients, and them i can be involved with anything from researching existing products/concepts, concept generation, CAD modeling, rendering concepts, makign prototypes/models, photography, presentation boards, report writing, sitting in on client meetings... honestly no two days are ever the same here!

    but design is a huge field and a product design degree could take you down so many different routes - it's really up to you to work out what you want to do long term - and placement really helps with that. any further questions then ask away
    Thanks! All of that information is really useful So for example if I chose BA id still be able to learn how to make things function (like mechanics etc?) and have a knowledge of the technical side too it's just the learning style is different?

    And with BSc's what percentage divide would you say they have between maths/physics and design?

    And finally do you enjoy the course and the work you're doing at the consultancy you're at?

    Those are my last 3questions, thanks for taking the time to help
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    (Original post by mbw_97)
    Thanks! All of that information is really useful So for example if I chose BA id still be able to learn how to make things function (like mechanics etc?) and have a knowledge of the technical side too it's just the learning style is different?

    And with BSc's what percentage divide would you say they have between maths/physics and design?

    And finally do you enjoy the course and the work you're doing at the consultancy you're at?

    Those are my last 3questions, thanks for taking the time to help
    Yes you're correct, as a BA you will still learn to make products work. Do take into consideration that this is just for Brunel.. other courses may vary slightly, I couldn't say.

    In terms of modules - see below for the modules I took as a BSc student - these are subject to change however. The design modules tend to have a higher weighting (they are worth more in terms of overall percentage) - as a guess id say something like a 60 - 40 split between design and the technical stuff, but most of the technical modules have design aspects within them - its not like sitting in a maths class, you learn things that are relevant to designers - for example lets say youre designing a chair - you learn how to design it in design process modules, and in the mechanics module you will learn how to test and calculate if your chair is strong enough, and wont break if a person sits on it.

    FIRST YEAR MODULES:
    Design Process 1 (common across BA and BSc)
    Electronics and Mathematics
    Graphic Communication (common across BA and BSc)
    Mechanics for Design
    Workshops with Materials (making things in the workshop)

    SECOND YEAR MODULES:
    Design Process 2 (common across BA and BSc)
    Design for Manufacture and Communication (common across BA and BSc) - this has now been split into 2 modules which you will have to do
    Dynamics, Mechanisms and Stress Analysis
    Electronics, Programming and Interfacing

    I wont lie - my placement has been really hard work - I work 9 - 6pm.. and i usually end up staying later. I get paid very little (my parents have to help me out with money - but that was my choice and my family are in a position to do that, many placements pay higher and there is no need for this - that's down to you when applying) Overall I enjoy the work, my boss can be a bit too critical, and not very complementary, but thats him as a person, and long term it will push me to do the best that i can on a project, but its tough to hear so many negatives, and not a lot of positives (i do good work he just rarely acknowledges it). It's helped me to figure out where my strengths lie, and as third year is beginning to loom on me, im beginning to narrow down what I want to do with my career beyond placement. For a number of reasons I've had a very roller coaster year (my brother had meningitis not long after I started, I had a messy break up etc etc), but overall i've really enjoyed placement, but I'm coming to the conclusion that this just isnt the type of job for me, but it is an experience I have learned a lot from, and learning what you dont enjoy is as much of placement as learning new skills. But I love Brunel, the course (I wont lie it's a lot of work though), and most importantly I love being a designer
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    (Original post by littlemissmidget123)
    Yes you're correct, as a BA you will still learn to make products work. Do take into consideration that this is just for Brunel.. other courses may vary slightly, I couldn't say.

    In terms of modules - see below for the modules I took as a BSc student - these are subject to change however. The design modules tend to have a higher weighting (they are worth more in terms of overall percentage) - as a guess id say something like a 60 - 40 split between design and the technical stuff, but most of the technical modules have design aspects within them - its not like sitting in a maths class, you learn things that are relevant to designers - for example lets say youre designing a chair - you learn how to design it in design process modules, and in the mechanics module you will learn how to test and calculate if your chair is strong enough, and wont break if a person sits on it.

    FIRST YEAR MODULES:
    Design Process 1 (common across BA and BSc)
    Electronics and Mathematics
    Graphic Communication (common across BA and BSc)
    Mechanics for Design
    Workshops with Materials (making things in the workshop)

    SECOND YEAR MODULES:
    Design Process 2 (common across BA and BSc)
    Design for Manufacture and Communication (common across BA and BSc) - this has now been split into 2 modules which you will have to do
    Dynamics, Mechanisms and Stress Analysis
    Electronics, Programming and Interfacing

    I wont lie - my placement has been really hard work - I work 9 - 6pm.. and i usually end up staying later. I get paid very little (my parents have to help me out with money - but that was my choice and my family are in a position to do that, many placements pay higher and there is no need for this - that's down to you when applying) Overall I enjoy the work, my boss can be a bit too critical, and not very complementary, but thats him as a person, and long term it will push me to do the best that i can on a project, but its tough to hear so many negatives, and not a lot of positives (i do good work he just rarely acknowledges it). It's helped me to figure out where my strengths lie, and as third year is beginning to loom on me, im beginning to narrow down what I want to do with my career beyond placement. For a number of reasons I've had a very roller coaster year (my brother had meningitis not long after I started, I had a messy break up etc etc), but overall i've really enjoyed placement, but I'm coming to the conclusion that this just isnt the type of job for me, but it is an experience I have learned a lot from, and learning what you dont enjoy is as much of placement as learning new skills. But I love Brunel, the course (I wont lie it's a lot of work though), and most importantly I love being a designer
    Thanks so much for taking the time to write all this, it's really appreciated!
    I'll still have to put a lot of thought into it but it's looking like I'm likely to call the admissions person and ask if its possible to switch to BSC (I'm taking A level maths and have already had an offer so I'm hoping it won't be a problem) so if I do find it too technical then I can switch to BA while I'm there

    Sorry to hear about your year, but at least next year you're back at Brunel and away from the boss But thanks again for all your help I was beginning to panic!
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    Hey guys,
    How long did you have to wait after the interview for a response?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by ChlooM)
    Hey guys,
    How long did you have to wait after the interview for a response?

    Thanks
    The Tuesday after, so just under a week☺️
 
 
 
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