Lily_xxx
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Hello I'm starting my exams in May/ June and I'm taking the following
Maths
English language
English literature
It
Core science


Additional science
Spanish
Geography
Philosophy and ethics

I need to get at least 6-A*-B grades to get into my local sixth form





I was wondering if you have any tips to revising effectively to get the best grades possible, and when you I start revising
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Lau14
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(Original post by Lily_xxx)
Hello I'm starting my exams in May/ June and I'm taking the following
Maths
English language
English literature
It
Core science


Additional science
Spanish
Geography
Philosophy and ethics

I need to get at least 6-A*-B grades to get into my local sixth form





I was wondering if you have any tips to revising effectively to get the best grades possible, and when you I start revising
My advice would be start revision now. Even if you're only doing 20 minutes of reading notes here and there for some of the subjects, it's better than nothing.

First figure out which subjects need priority - which subjects are you going to need to work most in to get the grade you want? These will need to have more time spent on them, but you mustn't neglect your other subjects. Go over completed past papers and mocks to find out why you're losing marks - it's much easier to revise if you've got a starting point (eg. a topic you're struggling to understand or remember, if essay/long answer questions are tripping you up, etc).

To revise effectively you basically need to do two things: make sure you're revising often enough, and find a revision technique that works for you so that the revision is actually useful. This depends on how you learn, whether reading and writing things out is best, making revision notes/mind maps/posters, index cards (question/word on the front, answer/definition on the back). Past papers are always useful, but look at how many you have available (on your exam board's website - check you've got the right specification for your course!) and how many weeks you have until exams. You don't want to run out too fast.

You might find it helpful to have a revision timetable so that you know you're using your time properly. Draw out a grid showing a week, then mark in all the time you're at school/sleeping etc, anything you do regularly that means you can't revise. Then divide the rest of the time up between revision and free time - you need to find a balance between doing plenty of work, but also having time to yourself so you don't get too stressed. Developing good revision habits now will also make life much easier for AS and A level exams! If in doubt about how much revision you should be doing, start lower and build it up over the next few weeks when you see how much you can actually do. Over the Easter holidays make sure you do plenty of work - if having a structure helps you, write a new timetable out for those two weeks, or just a rough outline (eg. do revision 5 days, have Tuesday and Saturday off to see friends/relax).

Finally, take short, regular breaks during revision, otherwise you don't take things in as well. Good luck
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WhiteButterfly
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For Maths- Practice!!!!! Especially past papers!
Eng Lang- Past Papers...
Eng Lit- Read each novel/book/play and make notes. Also watch the movies if u can get hold of them. And there is no substitute of actually
reading the books.
For sciences- use textbook contents page as revision plan. Buy other textbooks and work from them. Make notes and flashcards etc. Watch
Youtube videos to help your understanding.
Philosophy and ethics- make notes, learn them, past papers. Mind maps help also. I got 96% for my mock so I know it works!!!
I don't do your other subjects. Sorry!!!
Good Luck
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SummerPi
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My tips are:

- Don't over exert yourself!
- Make sure you do some amount of revision every day. Even if it's just 1 hour (I find this especially useful for languages).
- Take frequent breaks.
- Make sure you have a good working environment. By this I mean a clean, tidy desk / table space to sit at.
- For things that just aren't sticking in your head write them on an index card / poster / post it note and put it somewhere where you will see it every day. For example, I have notes stuck on the wall in front of me where I sit at my computer.
- Make sure you have snacks and drinks around you.
- Get good amounts of sleep every night.


Good luck!!
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IAmAGuest:)
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Find out what type of learner you are to make sure your revision is efficient. There's no point in writing lots of notes and flash cards if you are an auditory learner. Past papers are a good idea, look at the mark schemes to see how marks are awarded and what examiners are looking for in answers. Also I don't forget to do some exercise as well even if it is just a 10-15min walk between study periods, fresh air and a change of scenery can do wonders.
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