Why are Southern English accents dying out, but Northern ones aren't?

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Phipp91
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#1
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#1
Ok- So as I'm sure many of us are aware, the majority of Southern English regional accents, i.e the Kent/ Essex, East Anglian and Oxford/ Hampshire accents, are pretty much dead now. The South West accents, and even Cockney, are slowly dying a death now too. It's all morphing into either "Jafaican", Estuary English, or RP. Is immigration/ internal migration a factor here?

However- in England, why hasn't this occurred in the West and East Midlands, North West, Yorkshire, and the North East? Is it simply due to distance from London? Or just hatred of Southern, or "posh" accents?

I understand how Scottish, Welsh and N. Irish accents might've survived however, with nationalistic/ language influences playing a part.

No trolling please
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Jibola240
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#2
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#2
I think it's internal migration and the distance from London. Although less common, you do see this in certain parts of the North and Midlands as well, where places which have seen significant migration from the southeast, see the regional accent of the area weaken. Being so close to London it was inevitable that places like Kent and Surrey would lose their regional dialects(weren't that distinctive from London start with tbh). The southwest hasn't quite lost the dialects but it has watered down quite significantly. I'm sure the media too, played a part especially in places like East Anglia, and the Southwest.
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Truths
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#3
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#3
Because of the expanding encompass of the working class maybe?
Or cockney is becoming out of fashion? Accents evolve all the time. Look at America, their oldest accent has completely died out. It just happens.
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redferry
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#4
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#4
Actually if you look at the facts the Southern accent is creeping North over time - it is the Northern accents dying out not Southern.
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DiddyDec01
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#5
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#5
There are no accents dying out. It just depends on who you socialise with.
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1732757
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#6
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#6
(Original post by DiddyDec)
There are no accents dying out. It just depends on who you socialise with.
This:top:

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Snagprophet
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Phipp91)
Ok- So as I'm sure many of us are aware, the majority of Southern English regional accents, i.e the Kent/ Essex, East Anglian and Oxford/ Hampshire accents, are pretty much dead now.)
How are they?
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Wahrheit
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Phipp91)
Ok- So as I'm sure many of us are aware, the majority of Southern English regional accents, i.e the Kent/ Essex, East Anglian and Oxford/ Hampshire accents, are pretty much dead now. The South West accents, and even Cockney, are slowly dying a death now too. It's all morphing into either "Jafaican", Estuary English, or RP. Is immigration/ internal migration a factor here?

However- in England, why hasn't this occurred in the West and East Midlands, North West, Yorkshire, and the North East? Is it simply due to distance from London? Or just hatred of Southern, or "posh" accents?

I understand how Scottish, Welsh and N. Irish accents might've survived however, with nationalistic/ language influences playing a part.

No trolling please
Actually this is happening a lot elsewhere. The West Midlands is all slowly coming to adopt a brummyish accent, for example. All that's happening is the dominant accent of the region is expanding due to the frequency with which people move around and travel.
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Swanbow
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#9
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#9
I don't know about Northern Accents not dying out. In the North West they are increasingly becoming homogenised and somewhat becoming more 'Mancunian', with 'Scouse' creeping into Cheshire and Northern Wales. Majority of the Lancashire dialects use to be rhotic, but now that is confined only to a few places, and predominately used by older people. Across the UK dialects are slowly dying out, being replaced by accents with largely similar vocabulary but only different pronunciation. It is a shame really, seeing the passing of our rich linguistic heritage, but such is life I suppose. As far back as 1577 someone was praising the English spoken by English settlers in Ireland, as because of their isolation the variety of English they spoke had not been affected by “habits redolent of disgusting newness''. Languages change and evolve, it is nothing new.

I suspect the decline of the 'cockney' has to do with a lot of the East End being rehoused in Essex after the war, with immigration also having a considerable effect. That said some of the strongest cockney accents I've heard were from middle aged, working class black guys. And across the South there is the advance of Estuary English, homogenising the more distinct regional accents of the South East. Interestingly enough Received Pronunciation even seems to be on the decline, and having undergone considerable Estuary-isation.
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flugelr
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#10
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#10
Where I'm from there is an interesting accent study. South of Aberdeen there is a school which accepts students from a town which largely consists of people who've moved to the area from all over the world - primarily to work in the offshore industry - and also accepts students from the fishing and farming communities traditional to the area.

Despite the fact that the kids go to the same school, there is a very noticable difference in accent, the kids whose families have moved to the area have a very generic Scottish accent which could come from anywhere. The kids with local families still have very distinct Aberdeenshire accents.

I could understand it if the kids went to different schools, but they don't, and haven't for over 25 years - when people really started moving into the area in large numbers from elsewhere.
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Maid Marian
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#11
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#11
Because Northern accents are better. :cool:
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Friar Chris
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#12
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#12
Because Northern accents are be-

Oh wait



(Original post by Maid Marian)
Because Northern accents are better. :cool:
qft.
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Maid Marian
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Friar Chris)
Because Northern accents are be-

Oh wait





qft.
Hahaha, beat ya. :aetsch:
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username1697607
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#14
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#14
What on earth are southern accents? can you give an example of one? I live in Hampshire and I can assure you among the right set of people the posh accent is not dying out...... I still have one and so do many of the people I know!!
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Joinedup
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#15
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#15
Here's a radical thought... If you're from the south you probably have a cloth ear for northern accents but an acute ear for southern ones.
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Paladian
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#16
Report 6 years ago
#16
There are posh accents everywhere for example the scots aristocrat who went to Eton has a posh accent. Southerners have a poor accent it's called a drawl somewhat like how gypsies speak. I believe its the same anywhere you go - that there will be a middle class for example in wales who speak with a posh accent and a working class where they speak with a broad accent. There are more working class people in the west and north of the country and thus more people with a broad regional accent.
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