Death Penalty – should it be reintroduced into the UK? Watch

raq123
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hello,
if you dont mind can you anwser it with few more details, much more in depth.

why ?
would it increase crime or decrease?
what about the cost, what cost will it have go through for it to be reintrouced?
will it solve anything?

any other informations please replay.
thanks
p.s - gather information for a assessment.
i guess this is a focus group.lol
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Kool_Panda
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America has one of the largest percentage of population in prison in the world. The death penalty (although not legal in all states) doesn't seem to have discouraged crime. Add to that the fact that many innocent people have been killed because they were wrongly convicted and it just doesn't seem like a very good idea.
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Dr Pesto
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moonkatt
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use the search function, this has been discussed at length several times over on this site, probably at a rate of once or twice a month. You'll find more than enough opinion for whatever piece of work it is you're doing
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Emily.97
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I would dread the innocent being killed.
That and the fact that it doesn't enable a criminal to face up to/learn from what they've done. There is no suffering involved for them, and if somebody murdered any of my loved ones I wouldn't feel that that was justice.
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A5ko
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Can you imagine the amount of innocent people killed here in the UK.

Our 'justice' system is already a joke, where criminals get off lightly and victims are punished.

I simply don't have enough trust in our system or those who preside over it, especially when it comes to life or death.
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HAnwar
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Yes. Only for really serious crimes e.g. murder or rape.
But there has to be enough proof and evidence for it.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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RF_PineMarten
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No. Even if you just introduce it for cases "beyond doubt", like terrorist attacks, there is always a risk that an innocent person will eventually be killed by it. There is no such thing as an infallible justice system, and for that reason I am strongly opposed to the death penalty. I would rather have thousands of murderers and rapists allowed to live than introduce the death penalty and end up accidentally killing even one innocent person.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Emily.97)
I would dread the innocent being killed.
I would dread the guilty being wrongly acquitted.

You need 10 out of 12 jurors to convict (83%). At best around 70% have supported the death penalty (in theory not when it is them making the decision).

You are asking a lot to keep jurors true to their oaths.
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Emily.97
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
I would dread the guilty being wrongly acquitted.

You need 10 out of 12 jurors to convict (83%). At best around 70% have supported the death penalty (in theory not when it is them making the decision).

You are asking a lot to keep jurors true to their oaths.
Where are these figures from?

Both the innocent being killed and the guilty being let free are concerns.
Unless there is actual proof that the death penalty reduces crime, then I have no reason to support it.
Again, death doesn't equate to suffering, and those who committ crime should suffer, although it doesn't seem that this reduces crime either.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Emily.97)
Where are these figures from?

Both the innocent being killed and the guilty being let free are concerns.
Unless there is actual proof that the death penalty reduces crime, then I have no reason to support it.
Again, death doesn't equate to suffering, and those who committ crime should suffer, although it doesn't seem that this reduces crime either.
The first figure is just the law. 10 out of 12 jurors must convict.

70% is usually given as the high water mark for post-abolition death penalty support

See here

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14402195

The number of the wrongly convicted is always likely to be trivial (though not for them!). In the 64 years of 20th century capital punishment there are serious doubts around fewer than 5 cases.

However it was the unwillingness of jurors to convict that ended non-murder capital punishment in the 19th century. Moreover, we have a very high conviction rate for murder and it is arguable that it is this rather than the punishment that keeps down the murder rate. Weaken the conviction rate and domestic killers in particular might start to chance their luck of a favourable jury.
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DIN-NARYU-FARORE
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The state is not perfect and is subject to whimsical fancies

therefore it should not be allowed to kill people

Also something something socieconomic factors leading to crime something something being born with silver spoon something racial factors etc
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Davij038
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No

For reasons as posted already, but also we would lose our standing in the world and have to leave the EU which would be a disaster.

Life should mean life though
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The_Mighty_Bush
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God no.
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Beechey
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(Original post by Davij038)
No

For reasons as posted already, but also we would lose our standing in the world and have to leave the EU which would be a disaster.

Life should mean life though
I'm not sure it would effect the UK's standing that much. The US is still seen as a bastion of democracy and justice, yet it executes prisoners semi-regularly.

In fact I would imagine the only thing that would be a repercussion would be leaving the EU, in which I seem to have much less faith than you and wouldn't really mind if we stayed or left (I hold the same opinion, I really don't think the UK would be that massively affected).

I'm not sure how the Commonwealth would react, or for that matter the ICC, or the ECHR.
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anosmianAcrimony
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(Original post by Beechey)
The US is still seen as a bastion of democracy and justice
:rofl:
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anosmianAcrimony
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(Original post by HAnwar)
Yes. Only for really serious crimes e.g. murder or rape.
But there has to be enough proof and evidence for it.

Posted from TSR Mobile
While I don't like slippery slope arguments, I can't see any obvious line that can be drawn between enough proof and evidence and not enough.
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anosmianAcrimony
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A large institution with all of these facilities, i.e. a prison, is what is necessary to humanely, securely incarcerate someone. A deep, dark hole will simply not cut it - how would they be fed? Where would their waste go? How can we ensure that they do not simply climb out again? How long would it take to dig enough holes for all of our serious criminals?
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Davij038
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(Original post by Beechey)
I'm not sure it would effect the UK's standing that much. The US is still seen as a bastion of democracy and justice, yet it executes prisoners semi-regularly.

In fact I would imagine the only thing that would be a repercussion would be leaving the EU, in which I seem to have much less faith than you and wouldn't really mind if we stayed or left (I hold the same opinion, I really don't think the UK would be that massively affected).

I'm not sure how the Commonwealth would react, or for that matter the ICC, or the ECHR.
Britain is viewed more favourably according to the global attitudes survey. We would still be part of the ICC as a member of the UN but would have to leave the ECHR which promotes abolishing the death penalty.

A Britain leaving the EU would be disastrous- of course we would survive but our economy would take a big hit as what happened to Greece. Euro sceptics say it won't be the case for the UK...despite holding meetings in which they work out how to try and keep buisness from deserting en masse: we would have to negotiate how we would deal with the 2 million or so Brits living in Europe...
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Beechey
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(Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
:rofl:
Whether we like it or not, it is how the country is viewed. More savvy people may see through it, but when you think of the 'Free World', the foremost nation is the United States.

(Original post by Davij038)
Britain is viewed more favourably according to the global attitudes survey. We would still be part of the ICC as a member of the UN but would have to leave the ECHR which promotes abolishing the death penalty.

A Britain leaving the EU would be disastrous- of course we would survive but our economy would take a big hit as what happened to Greece. Euro sceptics say it won't be the case for the UK...despite holding meetings in which they work out how to try and keep buisness from deserting en masse: we would have to negotiate how we would deal with the 2 million or so Brits living in Europe...
Most of that is complete speculation though, that's the problem, there have (as far as I'm aware) been no concrete investigations into what would happen. I highly, highly doubt UK GDP would drop by 25% because we left a trade bloc. If the UK were to take a hit, I'd say it would be less than the 2008 crash, which was about 5%. I think you may be playing up the importance more than it actually is. Obviously, like most, I hold the view of a reformed EU that's main priority is economic growth and competitiveness, not an open-book (as in who knows where they're going with it!) "federal" union. I'd be more than happy for it to morph into a trading bloc only, I don't see the political side (or the £20bn gross we pay) as worth it when we're slashing education and the like.

Also I'm in total agreement with keeping the death penalty abolished, I don't see it as a deterrent, much more as state-sponsored death. The state has no business (other than in times of war, obviously) killing people.
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