Vidsify
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#1
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#1
I'm unsure on this question

a) Expand (1+4/x)^2

Would you treat the 4/x as 4/1 or what?

Thanks in advance
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TenOfThem
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Vidsify)
I'm unsure on this question

a) Expand (1+4/x)^2

Would you treat the 4/x as 4/1 or what?

Thanks in advance
You treat it as \dfrac{4}{x}
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Vidsify
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#3
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
You treat it as \dfrac{4}{x}
Ok so how would I expand it?
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TenOfThem
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#4
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(Original post by Vidsify)
Ok so how would I expand it?
You would put that instead of x
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MSB47
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Vidsify)
I'm unsure on this question

a) Expand (1+4/x)^2

Would you treat the 4/x as 4/1 or what?

Thanks in advance
Because the power is a positive integer you can expand using the (a+b)n formula where a would be one and b would be x/4. Hope that helps.
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davros
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#6
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(Original post by Vidsify)
Ok so how would I expand it?
The same way you do any other expansion!

If it helps, write 4/x = y and pretend you're expanding (1 + y)^2
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Vidsify
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#7
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(Original post by davros)
The same way you do any other expansion!

If it helps, write 4/x = y and pretend you're expanding (1 + y)^2
What then at the end swap the y's for the 4/x?
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Phichi
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Vidsify)
What then at the end swap the y's for the 4/x?
I'm hoping you would've realised that by now after 4 posts telling you!
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Vidsify
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#9
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(Original post by Phichi)
I'm hoping you would've realised that by now after 4 posts telling you!
Well it wasn't particularly clear
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TenOfThem
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Vidsify)
Well it wasn't particularly clear
Seriously?
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CancerousProblem
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#11
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Use the taylor series expansion to expand it, setting f(x) = x^-1 and a=1
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Phichi
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#12
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#12
(Original post by CancerousProblem)
Use the taylor series expansion to expand it, setting f(x) = x^-1 and a=1
Clearly if he is asking a question on binomial expansion, I doubt he's really looking to taylor expand it, I doubt OP even knows about the taylor series, let alone can execute it, why post this?
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