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    To confirm, can nuclear mitochondrial deficits be transmitted from the father as well as the mother? Thanks
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    (Original post by jsmith6131)
    To confirm, can nuclear mitochondrial deficits be transmitted from the father as well as the mother? Thanks
    No, mitochondrial inheritance is maternal only as I understand it.

    (PS: You ask some really specific, quite obscure questions - is your medical school really that strict?)
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    Isn't "nuclear mitochondrial deficits" a conflicting statement? Are you asking about the DNA in the mitochondria and the nucleus? Or is nuclear simply referring to the DNA in the mitochondria?

    The statement itself seems ambiguous, but confirming what Democracy said mitochondrial inheritance is restricted to the maternal line.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    No, mitochondrial inheritance is maternal only as I understand it.

    (PS: You ask some really specific, quite obscure questions - is your medical school really that strict?)
    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Isn't "nuclear mitochondrial deficits" a conflicting statement? Are you asking about the DNA in the mitochondria and the nucleus? Or is nuclear simply referring to the DNA in the mitochondria?

    The statement itself seems ambiguous, but confirming what Democracy said mitochondrial inheritance is restricted to the maternal line.
    Hi thanks
    Yes, Eloades11, i'm talking about mitochondrial regulatory genes in the nucleus.
    I know that mtDNA is inherited only from the mother so was wondering if these nuclear-regulatory genes are maternal only too?

    Democracy, as my med school use MCQs for examinations the exam questions can often be very obscure themselves (and occasionally ask really bizzare questions that seem entirely irrelevant to anyone or anything (e.g: Who was the first individual to link pain with the brain [or something like that])....and as such i tend to be quite petty about detail. sorry but thanks both for your assistance
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    (Original post by jsmith6131)
    Hi thanks
    Yes, Eloades11, i'm talking about mitochondrial regulatory genes in the nucleus.
    I know that mtDNA is inherited only from the mother so was wondering if these nuclear-regulatory genes are maternal only too?

    Democracy, as my med school use MCQs for examinations the exam questions can often be very obscure themselves (and occasionally ask really bizzare questions that seem entirely irrelevant to anyone or anything (e.g: Who was the first individual to link pain with the brain [or something like that])....and as such i tend to be quite petty about detail. sorry but thanks both for your assistance
    No, all nuclear genetic material can be passed from father to child. It's only mitochondrial DNA that is inherited matrilinearly. Nuclear material that regulates mitochondria is passed down by everybody.

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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    No, all nuclear genetic material can be passed from father to child. It's only mitochondrial DNA that is inherited matrilinearly. Nuclear material that regulates mitochondria is passed down by everybody.

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    thanks
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    I know this is not related to the topic discussed, but I think the OP would be interested in this. There is an theory that mitochondria was an independent prokryotic cells that merged with another single cell organism called Symbiogenesis. Basically, 1.5 billion years ago, the ancestor of eukrayotic cells had engulfed an protebacteria ( close relative to rickettsiales which cause Q-fever) and instead of destroying by fusing it with an lysosomes vesicle containing enzymes (exocytosis), it forms an Endosymbiont relationship. The fusing of this protebactria and the single cell organism resulted in an acceslation of evolution. This is because the proto-mitochondria gave the cell more ATP synthesis capacity and energy production. When complex eukroyotes evolved sexual reproduction, the mDNA is passed on from the Females side. This is how we track our paternal ancestry.
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    (Original post by jsmith6131)
    To confirm, can nuclear mitochondrial deficits be transmitted from the father as well as the mother? Thanks


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    No,only from the mother.The mitochondria for male in located in the tail of a sperm which is lost by the sperm when it enters and fuses with the egg.
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    (Original post by Kadak)
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    No,only from the mother.The mitochondria for male in located in the tail of a sperm which is lost by the sperm when it enters and fuses with the egg.
    nuclear mitochondrial deficits. Mitochondrial DNA does not code for 100% of mitochondrial proteins.

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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    nuclear mitochondrial deficits. Mitochondrial DNA does not code for 100% of mitochondrial proteins.

    Posted from TSR Mobile


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    Oops,I meant it the way you said it 😊.
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    (Original post by jsmith6131)
    To confirm, can nuclear mitochondrial deficits be transmitted from the father as well as the mother? Thanks
    Short answer; yes. Bear in mind with all the answers above saying no that a lot of people on this forum are not undergraduate students but A Level students and their exam board gives marks for saying it's maternally inherited.

    Long answer: Yes. Genes encoding mitochondrial proteins have been integrated with nuclear DNA and that is split reasonably close to 50:50 between the paternal and maternal side during inheritance. Therefore, as with any mutations it is possible to inherit mitochondrial mutations and deficiencies from the father (through meiosis [and I suppose mitosis would be similar]) in this way. In fact the majority of mutations that lead to mitochondrial deficits are actually from mutations in the nuclear DNA as mitochondrial DNA is stored on a plethora of plasmids so any single mutation doesn't make a difference as there are numerous other plasmids to take its place. Nuclear DNA can be affected a lot easier!

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22215538
    Have a look at Scaglia (2012), in the Chapter here, quite useful!
 
 
 
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