Tj789
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After Nick says that West Egg is the "less fashionable of the two" he then says "though this is most a superficial tag".....does that mean that he's saying I shouldn't judge it just by its appearance?

Also in chapter two it says Myrtle carried her "flesh sensually" doesnt that mean shes fat but she's still flirty?
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crashMATHS
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(Original post by Tj789)
After Nick says that West Egg is the "less fashionable of the two" he then says "though this is most a superficial tag".....does that mean that he's saying I shouldn't judge it just by its appearance?

Also in chapter two it says Myrtle carried her "flesh sensually" doesnt that mean shes fat but she's still flirty?
The first quote seems to be another subtle indication of the corruptness of class that embodies the narrative, but only becomes clear as the narrative progresses. Nick is trying to link "less fashionable" to "a superficial tag", suggesting that West Egg's physical appearance or (traditionally) lower class value has no correlation to its actual moral value.

As we find out, Nick's trying to tell us about the fall of Gatsby, whose pursuit, to him, was nothing other than admirable, as he was true to the end with his "unbroken series of successful gestures". So, this quote seems to be highlighting how the "unfashionable" nature of West Egg isn't analogous to types of people within it, and accentuates his motif of reserving judgments.

With the second one, it just highlights how she's sexually appealing, even though rather 'plump'. Myrtle's sexual appearance is what Daisy doesn't offer to the masculine Tom, so her description perhaps is telling of the reason for Tom's infidelity to Daisy with Myrtle.
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Tj789
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(Original post by kingaaran)
The first quote seems to be another subtle indication of the corruptness of class that embodies the narrative, but only becomes clear as the narrative progresses. Nick is trying to link "less fashionable" to "a superficial tag", suggesting that West Egg's physical appearance or (traditionally) lower class value has no correlation to its actual moral value.

As we find out, Nick's trying to tell us about the fall of Gatsby, whose pursuit, to him, was nothing other than admirable, as he was true to the end with his "unbroken series of successful gestures". So, this quote seems to be highlighting how the "unfashionable" nature of West Egg isn't analogous to types of people within it, and accentuates his motif of reserving judgments.

With the second one, it just highlights how she's sexually appealing, even though rather 'plump'. Myrtle's sexual appearance is what Daisy doesn't offer to the masculine Tom, so her description perhaps is telling of the reason for Tom's infidelity to Daisy with Myrtle.
Tanx, thats really helpful

Also I was quite unsure about the opening of Chapter 3, please could you explain the quotes in bold...

At high tide in the afternoon I watched his guests diving from the tower of his raft, or taking the sun on the hot sand of his beach while his motor-boats slid the waters of the Sound, drawing aquaplanes over cataracts of foam. On week-ends his Rolls-Royce became an omnibus, bearing parties to and from the city between nine in the morning and long past midnight, while his station wagon scampered like a brisk yellow bug to meet all trains.

Really dont get the bit about his car
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the bear
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the raft or pontoon would have a diving board up some steps....

an omnibus is just a "bus"... he was running a shuttle service in his car...
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crashMATHS
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(Original post by Tj789)
Tanx, thats really helpful

Also I was quite unsure about the opening of Chapter 3, please could you explain the quotes in bold...

At high tide in the afternoon I watched his guests diving from the tower of his raft, or taking the sun on the hot sand of his beach while his motor-boats slid the waters of the Sound, drawing aquaplanes over cataracts of foam. On week-ends his Rolls-Royce became an omnibus, bearing parties to and from the city between nine in the morning and long past midnight, while his station wagon scampered like a brisk yellow bug to meet all trains.

Really dont get the bit about his car
The other person has explained the quotes.

It's all designed to introduce us to the character of Gatsby, his wealth and lavish style of living. It also helps mirror the conspicuous consumption that was present within the Roaring Twenties, particularly by those who were new to wealth.


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