DanielleLeahnora
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I am awful at maths! I got a C in maths GCSE but a lot of unit ask for a B which is worrying me because if they want a B surely that means you have to be good at maths! If its really mathsy i'll choose something else to study...
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Amy. J S
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(Original post by DanielleLeahnora)
I am awful at maths! I got a C in maths GCSE but a lot of unit ask for a B which is worrying me because if they want a B surely that means you have to be good at maths! If its really mathsy i'll choose something else to study...
I assumed that the a mathematical aspect to Psychology would be data handling, mostly. I'm not sure why you need achieve more than a C for that?
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German123
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That is what I would like to know.
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DanielleLeahnora
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(Original post by Amy. J S)
I assumed that the a mathematical aspect to Psychology would be data handling, mostly. I'm not sure why you need achieve more than a C for that?

If you search universities, loads want a B as a minimum and I have emailed the University of Manchester who also said I should retake my maths gcse:eek: what exactly do you mean by data handling? tables and graphs?
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19cvabn
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(Original post by DanielleLeahnora)
If you search universities, loads want a B as a minimum and I have emailed the University of Manchester who also said I should retake my maths gcse:eek: what exactly do you mean by data handling? tables and graphs?
I think it's more on statistics rather than pure maths. Difinitely you're going to do some hypothesis testing, correlation, confidence interval Anova and many more. There's no need to worry since they will teach you how to do it.

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DanielleLeahnora
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(Original post by 19cvabn)
I think it's more on statistics rather than pure maths. Difinitely you're going to do some hypothesis testing, correlation, confidence interval Anova and many more. There's no need to worry since they will teach you how to do it.

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Thankyou!
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iammichealjackson
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Most of it is spreadsheet work (on a thing called SPSS). I think most unis only expect you to know basics (mean, standard deviation) and then how to interpret the values of statistical tests without actually understanding where they come from. A few unis may expect you to be able to understand the formulas... they're generally pretty simple though, so you'd need to be at least slightly numerate (hence GCSE level B).
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username1822337
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The maths that is involved isn't really the same as what you generally do in school. However like people say above there is statistics involved and when I studied Psychology as part of my course at college the psychology side of it was quite difficult and I think some of it is more about memorisation which I didn't personally like. But don't let anything put you off, if it's what you want to do, go for it and if you find you don't like it, you can change and do something else!
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Unknown_user
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I got a B for maths at GCSE and I'm finding it all okay
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pak1994
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(Original post by DanielleLeahnora)
I am awful at maths! I got a C in maths GCSE but a lot of unit ask for a B which is worrying me because if they want a B surely that means you have to be good at maths! If its really mathsy i'll choose something else to study...
Generally not too much, however it will also depend on your university. My 1st year Stats module was a mathematically based one (so like stats in A Level Maths - although this is in no way required), but the 2nd year is research methods - so doing statistical testing like you do for experiments using a computer.
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chazwomaq
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As everyone mentions, the main maths is statistics. You might see the odd equation every now and then, but you would rarely be solving equations or anything like that.

However, you will probably be handling a lot of data, so should be comfortable calculating means, standard deviations, and probabilities. Everything else should be taught without assuming any more prior knowledge, but if you averse to maths in general you should bear that in mind.

Some people don't realize that psychology is a science, and like any science, it must use the language of mathematics.
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Emily.97
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There are a lot of decent universities who ask for a C in gcse maths, so what you're saying doesn't apply to all courses.
I would imagine the ones requiring a B are perhaps more challenging in terms of the mathsy aspect.
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