A* revision tips for GCSE English language Watch

sophiee1998
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hi! I'm in year 11 at the moment, and I'm really worried about my GCSE English Language exams in the summer. I'm confident in Literature and achieved an A* last year, but I'm worried about Language as I doubt I'll get the A* I want in it. I was wondering if anyone who's previously done the exam/due to take it and have achieved/hope to an A*/A could share any revision tips? (Other than just doing past papers - I'm trying to make notes before starting PP in the easter break for all my subjects) Thanks!
0
reply
jamestg
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
I'm in Y11 too and I feel that time management and knowing what is expected of you is crucial. You can't really revise much for it, obviously there's a few bits you can read through a revision book - but I think it's just down to practice and looking at mark schemes to know exactly what needs to be on that piece of paper.

I got an A* in my mock thanks to mrbruff (on YouTube) and his videos are really good!

Perhaps make notes of how long to spend on each question, how much to write, how to analyse texts, what techniques show etc. for each question. Although a few (such as techniques) are question specific. Also for Q5 - it is generally formal writing, so make sure you know how to write formally using lots of techniques. Q6 should be full of techniques and have a huge variety of structure etc. you probably know all of this.
0
reply
ElGenioEstúpido
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by jamestg)
I'm in Y11 too and I feel that time management and knowing what is expected of you is crucial. You can't really revise much for it, obviously there's a few bits you can read through a revision book - but I think it's just down to practice and looking at mark schemes to know exactly what needs to be on that piece of paper.

I got an A* in my mock thanks to mrbruff (on YouTube) and his videos are really good!

Perhaps make notes of how long to spend on each question, how much to write, how to analyse texts, what techniques show etc. for each question. Although a few (such as techniques) are question specific. Also for Q5 - it is generally formal writing, so make sure you know how to write formally using lots of techniques. Q6 should be full of techniques and have a huge variety of structure etc. you probably know all of this.
Hi

Can I ask in which order you answer the questions?
0
reply
jamestg
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by ElGenioEstúpido)
Hi

Can I ask in which order you answer the questions?
Me personally - 6, 1, 2, 3, 4 and then 5. However if Q4 looks hard, I'd move on to Q5 because they're equal the same amount of marks and then do Q4.

However, there is no 'right' way to the order. You can go from Q1-6, although you may end up rushing Q6 and not get as many marks.
0
reply
sophiee1998
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by jamestg)
I'm in Y11 too and I feel that time management and knowing what is expected of you is crucial. You can't really revise much for it, obviously there's a few bits you can read through a revision book - but I think it's just down to practice and looking at mark schemes to know exactly what needs to be on that piece of paper.

I got an A* in my mock thanks to mrbruff (on YouTube) and his videos are really good!

Perhaps make notes of how long to spend on each question, how much to write, how to analyse texts, what techniques show etc. for each question. Although a few (such as techniques) are question specific. Also for Q5 - it is generally formal writing, so make sure you know how to write formally using lots of techniques. Q6 should be full of techniques and have a huge variety of structure etc. you probably know all of this.
Thank you so much! I got an A* too (literally JUST on paper 1) but I always worry that my teacher over-marks our work as everyone seems to achieve high grades in class but doesn't replicate them in exams (Lit being a prime example!)
What exam board are you on?
0
reply
jamestg
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by sophiee1998)
Thank you so much! I got an A* too (literally JUST on paper 1) but I always worry that my teacher over-marks our work as everyone seems to achieve high grades in class but doesn't replicate them in exams (Lit being a prime example!)
What exam board are you on?
No problem!

Perhaps ask another English teacher you know to also mark your paper. Your school should really be doing this for mocks, because it means more than one teacher agrees it is worthy of the marks given. Just in case it's too harsh/kind.

I'm on AQA for both English Language and Literature, what about you?
0
reply
BeckaH2
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
For the source based questions, what I found most useful for an A* was not necessarily practicing past papers but instead practicing coming up with perceptive/unique/sophisticated comments to make about the articles given. Once you're used to the exam technique it gets a lot easier and faster to come up with things you could discuss in your answer, try to write the points that you believe 9/10 students wouldn't have come up with, this makes you stand out as an A/A* student. Not everything you write has to be this unique, however, but try to include at least a few perceptive interpretations per answer (since each question is usually marked by a different examiner, so they won't be able to 'get a general feel for your ability' across the paper as a whole). If you struggle to do this on a certain question, try to develop you 'regular level' points as far as you can, this separates you from slightly lower grade students who make many points but don't develop them very much. In addition, use sophisticated language wherever you can; don't say "this means" when refering to a quote from the source, instead use "this connotes/implies/signifies" etc, and embed your quotes!
Also, this goes for the non-source based questions too, if you've been given a mnemonic such as DAFOREST or THE RED RASP to help you remember a variety of techniques to use in your exam, try to treat this as a guide or prompt rather than a checklist. You definitely don't need to use all of these, use the ones that you feel are best suited to the question you've been given, otherwise you'll just end up 'technique spotting' and give yourself less time to develop your points, which is where most of your marks lie.
Hope that helps, this is the best advice my teachers gave me last year
0
reply
ElGenioEstúpido
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by jamestg)
Me personally - 6, 1, 2, 3, 4 and then 5. However if Q4 looks hard, I'd move on to Q5 because they're equal the same amount of marks and then do Q4.

However, there is no 'right' way to the order. You can go from Q1-6, although you may end up rushing Q6 and not get as many marks.
Thanks My teacher told us to do it like this: 1,2,3,4,6,5 so I was just curious. How did you revise or prepare for the exam?
0
reply
jamestg
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by ElGenioEstúpido)
Thanks My teacher told us to do it like this: 1,2,3,4,6,5 so I was just curious. How did you revise or prepare for the exam?
I watched mrbruff videos for an hour or so, and then I went into the exam knowing exactly what I have to do.

Once you've done endless past papers and practice papers, just focus on time management!
0
reply
ElGenioEstúpido
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by jamestg)
I watched mrbruff videos for an hour or so, and then I went into the exam knowing exactly what I have to do.

Once you've done endless past papers and practice papers, just focus on time management!
Thanks, yeah I watched his videos but I didn't manage my time well during my mock
0
reply
Serine Soul
Badges: 18
#11
Report 4 years ago
#11
Keep looking at mark schemes and you'll spot a pattern in what they want

It moved me from a B in the mock to the only kid who got an A* in lang
reply
Cherx
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by BeckaH2)
For the source based questions, what I found most useful for an A* was not necessarily practicing past papers but instead practicing coming up with perceptive/unique/sophisticated comments to make about the articles given. Once you're used to the exam technique it gets a lot easier and faster to come up with things you could discuss in your answer, try to write the points that you believe 9/10 students wouldn't have come up with, this makes you stand out as an A/A* student. Not everything you write has to be this unique, however, but try to include at least a few perceptive interpretations per answer (since each question is usually marked by a different examiner, so they won't be able to 'get a general feel for your ability' across the paper as a whole). If you struggle to do this on a certain question, try to develop you 'regular level' points as far as you can, this separates you from slightly lower grade students who make many points but don't develop them very much. In addition, use sophisticated language wherever you can; don't say "this means" when refering to a quote from the source, instead use "this connotes/implies/signifies" etc, and embed your quotes!
Also, this goes for the non-source based questions too, if you've been given a mnemonic such as DAFOREST or THE RED RASP to help you remember a variety of techniques to use in your exam, try to treat this as a guide or prompt rather than a checklist. You definitely don't need to use all of these, use the ones that you feel are best suited to the question you've been given, otherwise you'll just end up 'technique spotting' and give yourself less time to develop your points, which is where most of your marks lie.
Hope that helps, this is the best advice my teachers gave me last year
Great advice. cheers :yy:
0
reply
username1234032
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 years ago
#13
You can definitely study for English. Increase vocabulary, read, engage in creative and spontaneous writing. Also improving analytical skills and developing a well thought out opinion. Avoid just repeating you you've read which is a lot easier to do than you'd think. Look at all the resources your exam board has on their website. They should have teaching resources section which could help you. They have it with edexcel but I'm not sure about other exam boards.


Also the Englishbiz website is amazing. Definitely read that and try some of the tasks.
0
reply
jamestg
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 4 years ago
#14
(Original post by ElGenioEstúpido)
Thanks, yeah I watched his videos but I didn't manage my time well during my mock
Consider changing the order of questions.

If you're teacher says go from 1-6 because that's the best way, he is wrong. I recommend doing - 6, 1, 2, 3 and then either 4 or 5 depending on the difficulty of questions - so if Q4 is easier, do that before Q5.
0
reply
ElGenioEstúpido
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 years ago
#15
(Original post by jamestg)
Consider changing the order of questions.

If you're teacher says go from 1-6 because that's the best way, he is wrong. I recommend doing - 6, 1, 2, 3 and then either 4 or 5 depending on the difficulty of questions - so if Q4 is easier, do that before Q5.
Yeah will do thanks!
0
reply
jamestg
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 years ago
#16
(Original post by ElGenioEstúpido)
Yeah will do thanks!
No problem!
0
reply
Bonbonsweet
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 years ago
#17
Does anyone know how to answer question 4 because i am stuck. Since you guys got a*, would you mind sharing the technique??? In question 4, do you only talk about the language not the structure because i wrote about the tone and the audience and got very little marks? Also any tips on question 2 about making perceptive comments??
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • University of Portsmouth
    Postgraduate and Part-Time Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • Middlesex University London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (165)
18.46%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (91)
10.18%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (148)
16.55%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (131)
14.65%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (85)
9.51%
How can I be the best version of myself? (274)
30.65%

Watched Threads

View All