Why don't people vote Lib Dem?

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username1204031
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#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
The Green Party are delusional. They propose policies which are unfair and unrealistic, they're like what a kid dreams up in fantasy world. Leave fossil fuels in the ground? So who's going to pay tens of millions for investment in renewable energy? Bring railways back into public ownership, invest in energy efficiency, increase welfare. That's a lot of money and out and none in.

UKIP scapegoat the EU. People want to pretend that leaving the EU would fix everything when, realistically, it would ruin our economy. UKIP want to do it anyway.

The Lib Dems aren't extreme, they have reasonable policies that benefit all of us and that aren't completely impossible to achieve.

So why do people keep voting for parties that promise things that can't happen when there's a better option?
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justanotherposter
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#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
Lib Dems are ahead of the Green Party in polls so I don't think they are relevant, I agree though that the green party is extremely unrealistic, and their leader makes Ed Milliband look like he's good at interviews, there was a car crash interview from her the other day where she clearly didn't know what she was talking about.

UKIP are voted for by people who hate immigration, whilst they are ahead of Lib Dems in the polls they again are unlikely to have much impact and given that Lib Dems have some safe areas the Lib Dems will (probably) win more seats than them.

The Tories and Labour are who people will vote for though, fears of another coalition along with Nick Clegg going back on his pledge to scrap student fees (although depending on who you ask this may have been a necessary evil they had to accept to prevent us from having years of a parliament with no majority party) will prevent people from voting for anyone other than the big two.
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Davij038
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#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
I will obviously be voting lib dem. I have also noticed an increase in public support in recent weeks- I think people have woken up to the fact that labour are just as culpable if not more so than Clegg in the tuition fees debacle.

Lib dems won't have a chance in my constituency, I'm hoping they just save their deposit, so that when they inevitably recover they can have a good base to launch from. I (and a proffesor who predicted the last GE results) predict that the liberals will retain 48 seats and likley be in government again.
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Rabifrogs
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#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
The uk is on such a low people are looking for a fast change which is usually extremist parties. Lid dems, labour and conservatives don't change anything for the better anymore and I feel like everyone wants a fresh House of Commons this may


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Bazbaz
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#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
If I could vote, I'd vote Lib Dem, I don't lean to the right or left particularly, and I like that the libdems are generally fair. Also, as someone who's had to spend a lot of time dealing with the mental health services, the fact that they're pledging to put £500m per year towards them gets my vote. At the moment they're shockingly bad.

I think many people are just so switched off by the fees fiasco that they've just switched off, which is a shame, as they're the only party not getting increasingly more polar.
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Shannonleah
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#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
The tuition fees situation. It was promised and never happened.
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ngb9320
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#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by All_TheCyanide)
The tuition fees situation. It was promised and never happened.
But the had to compromise with the Tories, hardly their fault.
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NikolaT
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#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
Irreparable damage done by tuition fees U-turn, is without a doubt, the most significant reason.

Besides that, I'd say the failure of Clegg to differentiate himself/his party from Conservatives over the past 4 years has hurt him immensely. The few achievements he did have now have less significance.

There are true liberals/centrists who will still vote Lib Dem, but all those who voted for them for the sake of the protest vote will now just switch to Green and UKIP. Greens in particular seem to be good at picking up the student vote.
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Bazbaz
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#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by All_TheCyanide)
The tuition fees situation. It was promised and never happened.
True of basically every party ever...
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Birkenhead
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#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by All_TheCyanide)
The tuition fees situation. It was promised and never happened.
This is fair. After all, it makes the Lib Dems the only party to have not kept a promise they made before an election and therefore marks them out as especially deserving of exclusion from Parliament.

They didn't keep this promise because the Tories wouldn't accept it as part of the coalition agreement. I would concede that they could have made it their priority negotiating chip, especially given the emphasis they placed on the promise prior to the election, but they are definitely not unique in politics in having broken a promise and there were mitigating reasons for them having done so, which places them above both Labour and the Tories at least.
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hoonosewot
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#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by Birkenhead)
This is fair. After all, it makes the Lib Dems the only party to have not kept a promise they made before an election and therefore marks them out as especially deserving of exclusion from Parliament.

They didn't keep this promise because the Tories wouldn't accept it as part of the coalition agreement. I would concede that they could have made it their priority negotiating chip, especially given the emphasis they placed on the promise prior to the election, but they are definitely not unique in politics in having broken a promise and there were mitigating reasons for them having done so, which places them above both Labour and the Tories at least.
The bolded is nonsense and you basically acknowledge that in the following sentence. The Lib Dems had enough sway at that negotiation that they certainly could have protected their tuition fees pledge, which was probably their single most significant policy in terms of importance to their voter base.

They sacrificed it for a few small things and one massive thing which was the referendum on voting, which they also got fudged on by making it AV and not proportional representation.

So basically they betrayed and disillusioned the core of their support to give themselves a shot at semi-fixing a big issue for them long term, and then completely ballsed it up anyway.

That's why they've lost so many votes, and that's why they're going to have to scrap to stay relevant long enough for the next generation to come through who will line up with them idealistically but don't remember being shafted by them. This generation will largely split to Labour and the Greens.
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JayReg
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#12
Report 7 years ago
#12
Quite, they do have reasonable policies, socially left and economically central which should be a very positive concoction in a progressive society.

Given you'd imagine the peoples views fall somewhat along a bell curve around the centre I'm surprised they don't get more votes as well.
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KingStannis
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#13
Report 7 years ago
#13
They're not left or right so it's harder for the lay person to latch on to a populist ideological message from them.


If someone says to me they support the Liberal Democrats I immediately assume they know more about politics than your average voter of the other Parties.
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username1221160
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#14
Report 7 years ago
#14
I was a lib dem supporter for several years, not least because they were the only mainstream party to actively oppose the Iraq war. One of their councilors was a massive help to my family regarding a very sensitive issue.

Unfortunately they lost their way under Clegg. The rot started before the 2010 election but afterwards Clegg had no qualms about sacrificing the party integrity in return for a little sniff at power.

Like many lib dem voters, I don't intend to vote for them anytime soon.
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Rakas21
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#15
Report 7 years ago
#15
Whim I did seriously consider it in 2012-2013 I won't be voting Lib Dem because the left of the party is just too strong and the Tories have done enough in key areas for my vote.

With that being said I do commend the Liberals and were I a true liberal then I would be very grateful that you had a leader capable of getting you into government for the first time in 80 years.

In short, the electorate are fickle. If you gave me the choice between holding out on tuition fees staying in opposition or sacrificing that policy for all those they've enacted then I wouldn't even need to think about it.

At least the Libs know that they've got 10-15% (I think they'll get that) who will stick with them through thick and thin, they've had lower than that since the war.
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Asolare
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#16
Report 7 years ago
#16
I think people lost a lot of respect for Nick Clegg/Lib Dem when they entered the coalition government with conservative (and have 'seemingly' become out of the limelight). And I don't think anyone can forget Mr. Clegg's promise not to raise tuition fees and then agree to triple them.

I actually think more people have a bigger issue with the Liberal Democrats leader than the party policies themselves, but I will be voting for them most probably as I do think they actually have decent policies.

And if that TV head to head debate with Miliband vs Clegg instead of Cameron goes ahead, I reckon Clegg will be able to garner more support as he is generally quite good at debating.
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ottom
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#17
Report 7 years ago
#17
Because they stand for almost nothing and haven't so done in decades. Prior to the most recent election they won a large number of votes and seats on the basis that they were the biggest non-Labour/Tory party. Now they are in government and they are just more of the same to many of those who used to loyally vote for them.
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Birkenhead
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#18
Report 7 years ago
#18
(Original post by ottom)
Because they stand for almost nothing and haven't so done in decades. Prior to the most recent election they won a large number of votes and seats on the basis that they were the biggest non-Labour/Tory party. Now they are in government and they are just more of the same to many of those who used to loyally vote for them.
This is the sort of view that the uninformed layman spouts because he needs tribality and showy policies that waste lots of money without creating much benefit in order to see a party as 'standing for something'. The Libs have had an impact on this government's policies in many areas - here is a set of examples http://www.markpack.org.uk/files/201..._1200px-v5.jpg.

To me they stand for a party of sense made up of people who aren't in politics to get fast-tracked to the top but because they believe in a set of core values that aren't well represented by the other parties. Labour stand for enforced equality, the redistribution of wealth, a spendthrift benefits system and a complete disregard for individual liberty. The Tories stand for competent fiscal management, big business, profit and private enterprise at any social or cultural cost, a miserly benefits system, and a slightly more moderate disregard of individual liberty. The Lib Dems stand for the balancing of fiscal responsibility with other factors and have a much greater respect for individual liberty than any of the other main parties. This core distinction is enough for me to vote for them despite disagreeing with them on crucial issues like House of Lords reform and possibly also electoral reform.
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Davij038
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#19
Report 7 years ago
#19
(Original post by Birkenhead)
This is the sort of view that the uninformed layman spouts because he needs tribality and showy policies that waste lots of money without creating much benefit in order to see a party as 'standing for something'. The Libs have had an impact on this government's policies in many areas - here is a set of examples http://www.markpack.org.uk/files/201..._1200px-v5.jpg.

To me they stand for a party of sense made up of people who aren't in politics to get fast-tracked to the top but because they believe in a set of core values that aren't well represented by the other parties. Labour stand for enforced equality, the redistribution of wealth, a spendthrift benefits system and a complete disregard for individual liberty. The Tories stand for competent fiscal management, big business, profit and private enterprise at any social or cultural cost, a miserly benefits system, and a slightly more moderate disregard of individual liberty. The Lib Dems stand for the balancing of fiscal responsibility with other factors and have a much greater respect for individual liberty than any of the other main parties. This core distinction is enough for me to vote for them despite disagreeing with them on crucial issues like House of Lords reform and possibly also electoral reform.
Spot on.

You also forgot to mention a bumbling, incompetent, remnant socialist party Labour party that are quite happy to go for our civil liberties.

They're also in my view the most dishonest party by a land mile.

Case in point, my local labour candidate wrote a flier damning the lib dems for the rise in tuiton fees. Which is strange as on his voting record, he voted Very Strongly for a rise in tuition fees.
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username1230881
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#20
Report 7 years ago
#20
(Original post by JordanL_)
The Green Party are delusional. They propose policies which are unfair and unrealistic, they're like what a kid dreams up in fantasy world. Leave fossil fuels in the ground? So who's going to pay tens of millions for investment in renewable energy? Bring railways back into public ownership, invest in energy efficiency, increase welfare. That's a lot of money and out and none in.

UKIP scapegoat the EU. People want to pretend that leaving the EU would fix everything when, realistically, it would ruin our economy. UKIP want to do it anyway.

The Lib Dems aren't extreme, they have reasonable policies that benefit all of us and that aren't completely impossible to achieve.

So why do people keep voting for parties that promise things that can't happen when there's a better option?
I would've voted for the Lib Dems in 2010 - what they promised sounded amazing: electoral reform, House of Lords reform, and a tuition fee cut are my priorities.

BUT

While I can forgive them for the tuition fee mess, everything else went badly. They could've gone into a coalition with Labour, and they would've agreed with a lot more, so a lot more could have been achieved. Looking back over the last 5 years, what have the Lib Dems achieved with the Conservatives?

The AV referendum failed. They pledged STV originally, but ended up with nothing. House of Lords reform failed. Tuition fees rose, and while Lib Dems had the option of abstaining on that vote, many didn't. So a (failed) referendum... that's about it.

Despite the coalition with the Conservatives, I'd probably still want to vote for them (unfortunately I can't) if they continued their STV, House of Lords reform, and cut in tuition fee pledges. Votes at 16 would be nice. But they've not offered any of this - and they want to keep tuition fees high - so Labour it would be.

I won't be able to vote until 2020, or whenever the next election is (providing it's after mid-2016). The Lib Dems might get my vote in the future, particularly if Labour gains power this year and breaks their promises, but it's unlikely. Basically, they should've gone with Labour in 2010 - right now, we could have a reformed House of Lords, a different electoral system and maybe even £3k tuition fees. We certainly wouldn't have the bedroom tax. What a life that would be.
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