India's Daughter documentary Watch

drowzee
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Has anyone see this documentary on BBC four last night? If not, I urge you to do so. It is about the 2012 Dehli gang rape. The views on women portrayed is sickening and disheartening, not that I am surprised. India's government is trying to supress this documentary just shows how they care more about "shame" rather than a poor girl's life.

As girl that comes from an Indian background, and has first hand seen sexism within the Indian community in this country, it really does hit me hard. The way the dauther's mother was describing how people were asking "why she is celebrating for having a girl", I have had first hand experience with this, with one of my baby cousins. It just goes to show modern day feminism is needed.

You can read more about it here:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-10088890.html
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TheonlyMrsHolmes
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Yes I just watched it, it was by far the most heartbreaking documentary I ever have watched. Yes I agree modern feminism is needed.
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samba
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(Original post by drowzee)
It just goes to show modern day feminism is needed.

(Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
Yes I just watched it, it was by far the most heartbreaking documentary I ever have watched. Yes I agree modern feminism is needed.
The modern feminist movement identifies with issues such as this and takes them on? I thought it was all about banning the sun, 'rape culture' in the uk, and lads banter these days!?
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DonkeyPunch
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If Gandhi and Hitler were alive things would have been different.
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drowzee
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(Original post by samba)
The modern feminist movement identifies with issues such as this and takes them on? I thought it was all about banning the sun, 'rape culture' in the uk, and lads banter these days!?
I don't see it like that. I guess it is relative to each country, issues regarding the role of women is much worse in places like India. There are still problems in the UK, regarding both genders, that need to be tackled. Women are more likely to relate to iues which affect thm directly, and this doesn't. Though as someone that has been born here, but from an Indian background, it really hit me hard.
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drowzee
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(Original post by DonkeyPunch)
If Gandhi and Hitler were alive things would have been different.
Care to explain?
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Bombay-Tough-Guy
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(Original post by drowzee)
Has anyone see this documentary on BBC four last night? If not, I urge you to do so. It is about the 2012 Dehli gang rape. The views on women portrayed is sickening and disheartening, not that I am surprised. India's government is trying to supress this documentary just shows how they care more about "shame" rather than a poor girl's life.

As girl that comes from an Indian background, and has first hand seen sexism within the Indian community in this country, it really does hit me hard. The way the dauther's mother was describing how people were asking "why she is celebrating for having a girl", I have had first hand experience with this, with one of my baby cousins. It just goes to show modern day feminism is needed.

You can read more about it here:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-10088890.html
these shameful attitudes that purvey in some indian society are tied to historic societal factors, primarily poverty and lack of education.

Older women in society in india are highly respected and treated as an , aunty' regardles of your relation . its is attitude toward young girls and young women that needs to change. In the parts of india that live in extreme poverty, having a daughter simply means another large cost to bear for the parents, while they struggle to feed everyone - and its this outdated attitude that had purveyed even in the current older generation. i would say that middle classes do not suffer this attitude to the same extent as poorer community.

and the attack on the girl in Delhi - again committed by a groups of poor , uneducated men of the lowest societal group shows that. their attitude to a young women that wasnt fully covered up and holding hands with their unmarried partner was twisted, but set in an old fashioned attitute toward young women.

i would say that india is changing in this attitude and the seriousness - so much so that 4 of those delhi attackers have been given the death penalty. In the uk i see that even serial rapists have been let out of prison after just 6 years served - has noone commented on this fact?
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drowzee
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(Original post by Bombay-Tough-Guy)
these shameful attitudes that purvey in some indian society are tied to historic societal factors, primarily poverty and lack of education.

Older women in society in india are highly respected and treated as an , aunty' regardles of your relation . its is attitude toward young girls and young women that needs to change. In the parts of india that live in extreme poverty, having a daughter simply means another large cost to bear for the parents, while they struggle to feed everyone - and its this outdated attitude that had purveyed even in the current older generation. i would say that middle classes do not suffer this attitude to the same extent as poorer community.

and the attack on the girl in Delhi - again committed by a groups of poor , uneducated men of the lowest societal group shows that. their attitude to a young women that wasnt fully covered up and holding hands with their unmarried partner was twisted, but set in an old fashioned attitute toward young women.

i would say that india is changing in this attitude and the seriousness - so much so that 4 of those delhi attackers have been given the death penalty. In the uk i see that even serial rapists have been let out of prison after just 6 years served - has noone commented on this fact?
I'm not trying to shame india, and I agree that the UK also has it's own problems, but let's not pretend that these issues are not worse India. I agree that these morals are a consequence of lack of education, however how do you explain the words of the two highly educated defense lawyers? It is more of a cultural issue, in my honest opinion. This idea of shaming women for rape is deeply ingrained, and again, I'm not saying everyone in india has these views, but a lot of people do. I don't agree that the views are changing enough though. If this particular case had not garnered so press attention, I wonder what the outcome would have been.
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Bombay-Tough-Guy
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(Original post by drowzee)
I'm not trying to shame india, and I agree that the UK also has it's own problems, but let's not pretend that these issues are not worse India. I agree that these morals are a consequence of lack of education, however how do you explain the words of the two highly educated defense lawyers? It is more of a cultural issue, in my honest opinion. This idea of shaming women for rape is deeply ingrained, and again, I'm not saying everyone in india has these views, but a lot of people do. I don't agree that the views are changing enough though. If this particular case had not garnered so press attention, I wonder what the outcome would have been.
you obviously didnt read my post at all. it is not 'women' that are dis-respected in india, it is 'young women. and that too generally by the poorest and uneducated in society. the attitutde toward them is that they should nt be out dressed in a western manor hanging out with boys. its a old fashioned atittiude that leads to men liek this sort committing crimes like this..
and the reaction to the publicity of the case has been that the indian courts have taken the most extreme action - ie the death penalty. again thanks to the fact that india has a free press by which public outrage is often channelled.

in the uk there may be a higher conviction rate, but look at the deterrent offered - typical rapists serves a handful of years and then walks free. where is the documentary on this?
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TaintedLight
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Do you have a link to the video?
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drowzee
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(Original post by DiceTheSlice)
Do you have a link to the video?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUvlwmIfyx0
It' also on BBC iplayer.
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TaintedLight
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(Original post by drowzee)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUvlwmIfyx0
It' also on BBC iplayer.
Cheers. Holy crap this is one hour
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drowzee
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(Original post by DiceTheSlice)
Cheers. Holy crap this is one hour
You're welcome. Yeah some parts are very difficult to hear, but it is an essential watch.
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Idunnolife45
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I don't know if people have seen this documentary - but it is about the horrifying gang-rape case of Dec 2012. It is a sad, shocking but revealing documentary which has now been banned from India due to reasons (which I find absolutely stupid)

I just want to talk to anyone who watched this and their opinions on this issue

EDIT : A thread of this issue was already posted by another user,
link http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3175379
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ShotsFired-9941
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(Original post by drowzee)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUvlwmIfyx0
It' also on BBC iplayer.
Thanks for the link...
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MrsSheldonCooper
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I feel like slapping that lawyer in the documentary. How dare he say that Indian culture is the best because it has no place for women... I don't know how he can sleep at night knowing he defends rapists
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Everglow
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(Original post by Idunnolife45)
I don't know if people have seen this documentary - but it is about the horrifying gang-rape case of Dec 2012. It is a sad, shocking but revealing documentary which has now been banned from India due to reasons (which I find absolutely stupid)

I just want to talk to anyone who watched this and their opinions on this issue

EDIT : A thread of this issue was already posted by another user,
link http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3175379
I've moved your thread into the TV forum so people can comment directly on the documentary if they wish.
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Idunnolife45
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(Original post by Reluire)
I've moved your thread into the TV forum so people can comment directly on the documentary if they wish.
Thank you so much :eek:
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Angury
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I finished watching this yesterday. Very sad story, but it was interesting hearing one of the criminals talking about it as well as the views of the lawyer. Shows how these incidents are more a symptom of society.

I'm a bit confused why this has been banned by the Indian Government though?
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Lyrical Prodigy
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(Original post by Idunnolife45)
I don't know if people have seen this documentary - but it is about the horrifying gang-rape case of Dec 2012. It is a sad, shocking but revealing documentary which has now been banned from India due to reasons (which I find absolutely stupid)

I just want to talk to anyone who watched this and their opinions on this issue

EDIT : A thread of this issue was already posted by another user,
link http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3175379
(Original post by drowzee)
Has anyone see this documentary on BBC four last night? If not, I urge you to do so. It is about the 2012 Dehli gang rape. The views on women portrayed is sickening and disheartening, not that I am surprised. India's government is trying to supress this documentary just shows how they care more about "shame" rather than a poor girl's life.

As girl that comes from an Indian background, and has first hand seen sexism within the Indian community in this country, it really does hit me hard. The way the dauther's mother was describing how people were asking "why she is celebrating for having a girl", I have had first hand experience with this, with one of my baby cousins. It just goes to show modern day feminism is needed.

You can read more about it here:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...-10088890.html

Hello

Both of your threads have been merged into one, just a heads up. Thanks
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