declineandfall1
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#1
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#1
Well, I'm lucky enough to have got
(attainable)
offers from from four British
universities.
So here I are my options:
Take a gap year and reapply to
Cambridge for
maths (the option I'm leaning toward.
I know
it's irrational but I've become
obsessed with
this uni since my rejection. I don't
think I
could forgive myself if I failed to give
it
another go)
Go to Trinity Dublin for maths and get
Schols (The
cheapest option but I'm not sure how
well
Trinity fares on the global stage)
Go to St Andrew's for maths. (I'm
Irish so this is pretty cheap)
Go to Warwick (I'd never heard of this
uni
before applying, but it's supposed to
be good)
Go to Imperial College London for
maths.
Go to LSE for maths with economics
(as a
subject my second choice on the CAO)
Since this is such an important life
decision,
I'm keen to hear as many opinions as
possible.
Thanks guys!
In connection with this, does anybody
know if any English speaking French
secondary schools would take on a
gap year teacher for maths and
economics for a year.
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Thorsas
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I'm in northern Ireland. My personal opinion is that England is too expensive to go to outside Oxbridge if you have other options. The London unis also have high reputations but it's even more expensive!

St. Andrews and Trinity both have strong reputations and regardless I think will give you a stellar education. If you're from Ireland, no one can fault you for going to Trinity, the best university in your home country! As you say, both are cheap (not counting Dublin's living costs perhaps?) so your choice is "city vs town" and "near vs far" from home.

I'd discount the other English options myself (I have done so on my own application!) but there are those who believe reputation is everything. I think Trinity and St. Andrews are just as likely to 'get you an interview' from an employer's perspective as the English universities and then it comes down to your additional experience. If money isn't really a problem for you then ironically it might make the decision tougher because you've got options. Remember though, the person offering you a job is not sitting reviewing CVs with a copy of the most recent University League Tables strapped to the wall opposite them. They're all great universities and you should be proud to attend any one of them.

As for re-applying to Cambridge, I can't advise as I know nothing about the process. If you do decide to go for this (as I'm sure you know) I think it is advisable to try and do something that proves you love and are continuing to work at Maths. Teaching Maths as you plan sounds perfect!

If you're confident you can fund your gap year then it might be a good life experience regardless of whether you are ultimately accepted, thus boosting your CV and yourself for the future. You can also I believe ask universities to defer the offer they gave you for a year, to save you reapplying to them in the next cycle. (Not sure on how this works at all, I am merely under the impression this is possible!)

Whatever you decide I wish you every success. You are obviously a strong applicant anyway to have received your other offers so you are very much faced with a 'first world problem' and you will have great opportunities no matter what. Good luck!
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Oxy
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(Original post by declineandfall1)
Well, I'm lucky enough to have got
(attainable)
offers from from four British
universities.
So here I are my options:
Take a gap year and reapply to
Cambridge for
maths (the option I'm leaning toward.
I know
it's irrational but I've become
obsessed with
this uni since my rejection. I don't
think I
could forgive myself if I failed to give
it
another go)
Go to Trinity Dublin for maths and get
Schols (The
cheapest option but I'm not sure how
well
Trinity fares on the global stage)
Go to St Andrew's for maths. (I'm
Irish so this is pretty cheap)
Go to Warwick (I'd never heard of this
uni
before applying, but it's supposed to
be good)
Go to Imperial College London for
maths.
Go to LSE for maths with economics
(as a
subject my second choice on the CAO)
Since this is such an important life
decision,
I'm keen to hear as many opinions as
possible.
Thanks guys!
In connection with this, does anybody
know if any English speaking French
secondary schools would take on a
gap year teacher for maths and
economics for a year.
What're you going to do on your gap year? I think Cambridge will want to know you did something 'useful'.

As for the other unis, I agree with everything the previous poster said. Warwick, LSE, Imperial, Trinity and St Andrews are all fantastic unis. What is most important are the opportunities that they afford and I think all of them will offer fantastic oppurtunities whatever one you pick. But it is more about which one you will feel most comfortable with....University is more than just about the institution, its about the experience.

Don't get hung up about the Cambridge rejection, you will look back at graduation and laugh at it. This may sound silly now but once you've done 3/4 years at uni...this will seem so insignificant.

You could always go and do a masters at Oxbridge if you're that desperate for a piece of paper with their name on it.
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declineandfall1
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Apart from Trinity, which I found OK, I haven't really visited any of the above universities except Cambridge (for the interview). I really, really liked the experience of being there. It helped that I knew one of the student helpers, and by the end of the day, felt I knew all the helpers and would-be vets. I've never visited any campus that I so immediately fell in love with.

I could make a gap year productive. I want to try acquiring a job teaching maths and becoming fluent in French. I could also aim toward an IMO silver medal. Also learning a musical instrument sounds fun
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Okorange
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Take the gap year then, it seems as if you really want to reapply to Cambridge. In the grand scheme of things 1 year lost isn't anything and you aren't totally losing it as you are doing productive things with your time.
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suedonim
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St Andrews has serious accommodation issues - read the comments here https://www.change.org/p/professor-l...odation-crisis

Only any point in reapplying to Cambridge if you do really well in STEP. Cambridge would also expect you to do something maths related in your gap year and not just teaching but continuing mathematical development, maybe an open university maths course http://mathschoices.open.ac.uk/ Be prepared to possibly be encouraged into Comp Sci if you dont do well in first year maths exams.

Any of your universities are good choices, Warwick is a common second choice after Cambridge because of its excellent reputation.
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Okorange
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(Original post by suedonim)
St Andrews has serious accommodation issues - read the comments here https://www.change.org/p/professor-l...odation-crisis

Only any point in reapplying to Cambridge if you do really well in STEP. Cambridge would also expect you to do something maths related in your gap year and not just teaching but continuing mathematical development, maybe an open university maths course http://mathschoices.open.ac.uk/ Be prepared to possibly be encouraged into Comp Sci if you dont do well in first year maths exams.

Any of your universities are good choices, Warwick is a common second choice after Cambridge because of its excellent reputation.
While the accommodation issues are serious, 1st years are still guaranteed accommodation and the university is trying to address the issue. I think for future years it will be less of a concern as there are new university accommodation being built and private ones being built as well.
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suedonim
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(Original post by Okorange)
While the accommodation issues are serious, 1st years are still guaranteed accommodation and the university is trying to address the issue. I think for future years it will be less of a concern as there are new university accommodation being built and private ones being built as well.
Doesnt help having accommodation for the first year if you then have to transfer university because you can't afford to live anywhere near it, some students have done that. The university is said to have plans to take some accommodation out of use to rebuild so I think only those who work for the university would try to claim it's going to get much better in the next few years. Anyone thinking of going there should be asking how many new places, when, how many more students the university will offer places to and how much the new accommodation will cost. And ask existing students, who may give you a more honest view.
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theresheglows
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(Original post by Okorange)
While the accommodation issues are serious, 1st years are still guaranteed accommodation and the university is trying to address the issue. I think for future years it will be less of a concern as there are new university accommodation being built and private ones being built as well.
While the 1st years are guaranteed accommodation, some of it is now having to be in postgraduate halls as the uni is taking more new students than will fit in undergraduate halls. The new uni accommodation is not yet ready, and from the sound of it is going to be extremely expensive when it is. In the meantime they have closed some of the cheaper accommodation (Fife Park), so making the situation even worse. The private halls you mention are going to start being in use next year, but they are all expensive en suite rooms, some of the 800 a month or more; so not really a feasible option for most people. The only students sitting pretty are those whose parents have bought them a flat (this is surprisingly common around here), they then rent out the other rooms and so actually make money.
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