bookfiend
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Hi I want to be an author (I know, me and the rest of the world). It's the only thing that interests me. But my parents want me to do English at uni instead of creative writing. I want to learn how to write better. How can I convince them it's not a waste of time and money?
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James Milibanter
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(Original post by bookfiend)
Hi I want to be an author (I know, me and the rest of the world). It's the only thing that interests me. But my parents want me to do English at uni instead of creative writing. I want to learn how to write better. How can I convince them it's not a waste of time and money?
Well, I think that a degree in english literature is a much better option. Considering that writing is something that many authors before their debut novel do in their spare time. As you may know, much like I do, not everyone can write, and I doubt that it can be taught very well either, if you have a gift use it. An English literature degree will be much more in-depth and you'll become very critical of others' work as well as gain many pointers (do's and don't's and such). Sorry to say but I think your parents are right on this one.
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mememerachel
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You can minor in Creative Writing while majoring in English. It's the best of both worlds~
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3P2S3
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you can pick up modules on straight English Lit courses on creative writing. You can also do combined honours of English Lit and Creative Writing. I'm also sure, once you get to your department and become familiar with the tutors, there will be a tutor who would be happy enough to review your writing work/help you work on it.
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TheWaffle
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(Original post by bookfiend)
Hi I want to be an author (I know, me and the rest of the world). It's the only thing that interests me. But my parents want me to do English at uni instead of creative writing. I want to learn how to write better. How can I convince them it's not a waste of time and money?
Universities such as Manchester do degrees such as English and Creative Writing. Also, depending where you are from there are lots of creative writing classes that you can take outside of uni. Are you from the north west/ east or looking to study there?
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EmmaVicky32
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I'm going to be doing English Literature and Creative Writing in September x


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tanii
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(Original post by bookfiend)
Hi I want to be an author (I know, me and the rest of the world). It's the only thing that interests me. But my parents want me to do English at uni instead of creative writing. I want to learn how to write better. How can I convince them it's not a waste of time and money?
You could combine Literature with Creative Writing and get the best of both. Plus, studying English my self, I feel they will compliment each other well and help you with your desired career. Universities like Newman allow you to combine such modules for example.

T.
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k3ro
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As others have said, degrees that are English + creative writing might be best for you.

To be honest though, I'd argue that writing is something you need to practice, not necessarily be taught during lectures (especially if you want to be an author). If creative writing is your hobby, you can always do it in your own time alongside whatever degree you decide to study (that's what I did).
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broo303
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i Agree, you can do a combination of the 2 and decided whether you want to focus more on English or Creative writing by choosing what subject you would like to do more modules in. However you don't have to just combine English with creative writing, there are a variety of combinations you could make including Drama and education. Creative writing is not a waste of time at all i have a friend studying the subject and he is now working on publishing his first but with his editor.
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Glyndwr University
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Hi Bookfiend, at Glyndŵr University we offer a number of Creative Writing options, one combining it with English and the other with History.

Our courses are set up not only to help you hone your writing skills, but to also help you build transferable skills for other industries. To give you an example, in recent times our graduates have gone on to work in writing, bookselling, publishing, editing, teaching and careers in the media.

If you'd like to speak to someone about the course directly you can give us a call on 01978 293439, or by email on [email protected].

Good luck!
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corybantically
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(Original post by bookfiend)
I want to be an author (I know, me and the rest of the world). It's the only thing that interests me. But my parents want me to do English at uni instead of creative writing. I want to learn how to write better. How can I convince them it's not a waste of time and money?
Hi! I've just finished a degree in Literature with Creative Writing (Minor/Major style) and am about to start a masters degree in Creative Writing (poetry) at UEA. Like you I just wanted to be a writer (still do!) so I hope this helps!

Firstly, doing a degree in creative writing is not really about becoming a writer. To do well in it, and to make it 'worthwhile' (worth is such a subjective term!) I think you need to be looking for more than a springboard into being published, because in all honestly, the degree alone won't do that. What it will give you is an in-depth, academic knowledge of the skills and practicalities of writing, an ability to analyse and construct texts with sophistication and subtlety, and the ability to critically evaluate your own writing. All of these things are very much worthwhile, and can usefully be applied on many career paths. People underestimate it as a subject, but when taught well, it is an academically rigorous degree with applications in many subject areas.

However, I do recommend that you study it with another subject, probably english literature. Employers are still a bit suspicious of it as a subject and if I'm honest some Creative Writing degrees are a bit easy - teaming it with another subject will make sure that the academic rigour is there as well, and help make you a stronger writer as you engage the ideas from your other areas of studies with your writing.

If you need other arguments about CW being a good way to become a writer, CW degrees provide a supportive environment and a place to learn the discipline it take to write. People with stories in them come from every degree, but if you are also interested in the practice and field of writing, do it through creative writing
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username1229433
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Tbh, you don't really need a creative writing degree to become an author and it doesn't always guarantee an easy access into the creative industry.

However, you do have plenty of options on how you can develop your writing skills such as doing an English Literature with Creative Writing degree, taking part in a creative writing class as a hobby or finding a social club that solely focus on writing.

If you have to choose between studying a creative writing degree and English Literature, then I think that English Literature will be a better option as you can do so much with it.




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ARUStudents
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(Original post by bookfiend)
Hi I want to be an author (I know, me and the rest of the world). It's the only thing that interests me. But my parents want me to do English at uni instead of creative writing. I want to learn how to write better. How can I convince them it's not a waste of time and money?
Hey! Did you know at Anglia Ruskin University you can do Writing and English literature as a combined course with a look to go on to do a Master's in Creative Writing?
I'm in my final year at ARU doing Writing and English Literature. For my final project (dissertation), I am doing 8000 words of a novel with a look to send it to agents once it's been marked! The course is split 50/50 for all three years so you get the perfect balance of both developing your creative skills as a writer and learning to write analytically of other creative literature. You can also choose your modules so that you study material that appeals to you and you would like to emulate in your own work. Just remember that ultimately this is your choice!
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squigglet13
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(Original post by bookfiend)
Hi I want to be an author (I know, me and the rest of the world). It's the only thing that interests me. But my parents want me to do English at uni instead of creative writing. I want to learn how to write better. How can I convince them it's not a waste of time and money?
I'm having a VERY similar problem right now 😂. I was looking at English and Creative writing courses so they have the two together. Problem is.. some want a Literature A level but I only did Language. I don't know if this would be beneficial to you
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ARUStudents
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(Original post by squigglet13)
I'm having a VERY similar problem right now 😂. I was looking at English and Creative writing courses so they have the two together. Problem is.. some want a Literature A level but I only did Language. I don't know if this would be beneficial to you
Hey! Anglia Ruskin 3rd year here!
I'm in my final term of my 3 year undergraduate course- Writing and English Literature. It's spilt 50/50 between creative writing and studying English Literature. This essentially means you learn how to write like a writer, and also how to read and analyse like a writer!

Plus what really swung it for me when considering ARU- all other universities I'd looked at wanted an A in English at A-Level, but I never knew anyone that got an A. ARU is perfectly happy to accept applicants with an A-Level at grade C or above in either Literature or Language! (A minimum of two A-Levels in total)

Hope this helps you!
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squigglet13
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(Original post by ARUStudents)
Hey! Anglia Ruskin 3rd year here!
I'm in my final term of my 3 year undergraduate course- Writing and English Literature. It's spilt 50/50 between creative writing and studying English Literature. This essentially means you learn how to write like a writer, and also how to read and analyse like a writer!

Plus what really swung it for me when considering ARU- all other universities I'd looked at wanted an A in English at A-Level, but I never knew anyone that got an A. ARU is perfectly happy to accept applicants with an A-Level at grade C or above in either Literature or Language! (A minimum of two A-Levels in total)

Hope this helps you!
Thank you so much I'll definitely look In to that
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octo
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(Original post by squigglet13)
I'm having a VERY similar problem right now 😂. I was looking at English and Creative writing courses so they have the two together. Problem is.. some want a Literature A level but I only did Language. I don't know if this would be beneficial to you
I'd recommend looking into unis that ask for creative writing portfolios for their English and Creative Writing courses. I know that when I applied to Royal Holloway, they accepted English Language instead of Literature if your portfolio was strong -- I'd recommend checking different courses, and if there's one you've got your heart set on, then email their admissions team before applying and ask if you've got a shot with Language. <3
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