Let’s be honest. We ignore Congo’s atrocities because it’s in Africa

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kumon
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Some lives matter more than others: the “hierarchy of death”, they call it. The millions killed, maimed and traumatised in the Democratic Republic of Congo are surely at the bottom of this macabre pile. The country was the site of the deadliest war since the fall of Adolf Hitler, and yet I doubt most people in the west are even aware of it. No heart-wrenching exclusives at the top of news bulletins; no mounting calls for western militaries to “do something”.

We are rightly appalled at a barbaric conflict in Syria that has stolen the lives of 200,000 civilians; and yet up to 6 million people are believed to have perished in the DRC. Not that the mainstream media alone can be berated for this astonishing lack of attention. The left have rightly championed the cause of a Palestinian people subjected to decades-long occupation and subjugation: surely the misery of the DRC does not deserve this neglect.
Although the murderous intensity of the war peaked between 1998 and 2003, the misery has persisted. According to Oxfam, civilians in the east of the country still face exploitation at the hands of armed groups. The UN has labelled the country “the rape capital of the world”. Women, girls and boys have been systematically raped as a weapon of war. Back in 2011, it was estimated that 48 women were raped every hour in the country. Men were raped, too: there are stories of men being raped three times a day for three years. Then there’s the cannibalism: at one point, pygmies in the north east were being killed and eaten by rebels.
It was a war that was remorseless when it came to the innocent: when 45,000 people were being killed every month, around half of them were small children, even though they only represented a fifth of the population. The war triggered devastating waves of starvation and disease which claimed the lives of millions.
Armed militias continue to commit atrocities, and the aftermath of the war has left the country impoverished and devastated. According to the International Rescue Committee, this is “the world’s least developed country in terms of life expectancy, education, standard of living and key health indicators”. And yet this vast country of nearly 80 million people barely punctures our consciousness. Why?
Being generous, perhaps the war was just too complicated. Some described it as Africa’s own “world war”, the spill-over from the Rwandan genocide that involved the armies of nine African nations. Many different, complex conflicts have intersected with each other. The country is awash with precious minerals that should be a source of huge wealth, but instead are magnets for armed profiteers. It is a misery that goes back generations: under the rule of the Belgian King Leopold II in the 19th and early 20th centuries, up to 10 million were killed in one of the greatest acts of mass murder in human history.
But we should perhaps just be more honest. On another continent, such a devastating war would never have been allowed to rage for so long. African lives simply do not matter enough: a death toll of up to 6 million would surely not have been tolerated elsewhere. For the west, it is a country of little strategic importance. As for the left, the complexity of the war was no excuse. It is a cause that should have been championed. It wasn’t, and millions died amid near silence. It must not happen again.


http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...rror?CMP=fb_gu

It's a shame to see this happening in our world, and that aid due to corruption isn't working, what practical concrete solutions do people have in mind?
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elоhssа
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The same people who complain about this, complain about Africa receiving negative news attention. Idiot libtards.
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IronMan97
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I completely agree. I wasn't even aware of the horrific state of the Congo until my Politics lecturer mentioned it a few weeks ago. I can't think of the last time it was even mentioned in British news!
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BilbosBallsack
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They seem to be doing fine, hasn't it's population sky-rocketed?

What about people of Ukraine and this conflict that America and the West have their part in creating?

Everyone always brings up Hitler and the Nazi's, seem to ignore the 12+ million killed under the Communist regime who of course the Nazi's saw to DEFEAT.

Bit unfair isn't it?
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RF_PineMarten
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We ignore it because it's not really that involved with us. With ISIS, there's the possible threat to western countries and a lot of foreign fighters (including some from Britain), and is much closer to Europe than DRC, so it creates news stories. Congo should get more media attention though, as should lots of other African conflicts.

Another possible reason is that we are actually attacking groups like ISIS and aiding their enemies, but with things like Congo there isn't a lot we can do as the situation is very different and even more complex.
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Arkasia
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Why copy and paste an article from that tedious little cretin Owen Jones? Just summarize his article into the typical Grauniad format of "white man bad. west bad. money bad.", and add a healthy dose of raising awareness from one's armchair for the sake of feeling good, much the same as a teenage girl feels charitable by sharing a facebook advert for Red Nose Day.
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al_94
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by RFowler)
We ignore it because it's not really that involved with us. With ISIS, there's the possible threat to western countries and a lot of foreign fighters (including some from Britain), and is much closer to Europe than DRC, so it creates news stories. Congo should get more media attention though, as should lots of other African conflicts.

Another possible reason is that we are actually attacking groups like ISIS and aiding their enemies, but with things like Congo there isn't a lot we can do as the situation is very different and even more complex.
in other words, no black gold.

ISIS are only a threat to us since we have blonked ourselves in that region.
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mali167
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It's the same with what's going on in Burma, Central African Republic and probably many other places we know nothing about.

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hellodave5
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And that's why I never watch the news. Tells what to think, and what to care about. Such bias, and most people don't even realise.
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Swanbow
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Well the UN, AU and individual African states are all trying to resolve the issues in the DRC, albeit with mixed results.

The Second Congo War was awful, and the world's reluctance to act was horrifying. But it was a political minefield, with many different factions being supported by different African nations. To pick a side would alienate important regional powers, and the peacekeeping mission did little to de-escalate the conflict which was already in full swing. I think the world was content to let it span it's course. But not nearly enough was provided in terms of humanitarian aid. Fortunately it came to an end. I don' think the world's reluctance to intervene was primarily because 'African lives mean less', but rather because of realpolitik, they had little to gain from it and it wasn't in their national interest. And realpolitik is also the reason why so many other African countries got involved.

As for the existing problems, such as legacy conflict in the Eastern DRC, MONUSCO is doing a better job at holding things together. But ultimately the only thing that will end the conflict is Kinshasa exerting federal control over their Eastern Provinces. Whether that is by force or negotiation is up to discussion.
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Rakas21
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Personally speaking i consider Africa and the Middle East the same as a hierarchy goes. The Middle East screws themselves because of religion while Africa can barely govern itself.

Unfortunately for Africa, there's a desert between the fighting and Europe so what happens there has little effect unlike the Middle East.

(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
in other words, no black gold.

ISIS are only a threat to us since we have blonked ourselves in that region.
Congo has the highest level of mineral wealth on the planet.

What it does not have (unlike the Middle East) is a border with Europe, Russia and close access to China and India.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Personally speaking i consider Africa and the Middle East the same as a hierarchy goes. The Middle East screws themselves because of religion while Africa can barely govern itself.

Unfortunately for Africa, there's a desert between the fighting and Europe so what happens there has little effect unlike the Middle East.



Congo has the highest level of mineral wealth on the planet.

What it does not have (unlike the Middle East) is a border with Europe, Russia and close access to China and India.
ye I know. Surely someone can make some money out of helping those in Congo :rolleyes:
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RF_PineMarten
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
in other words, no black gold.

ISIS are only a threat to us since we have blonked ourselves in that region.
Yes, but they are still a threat to us.

I'm not sure about oil, but Congo is very resource rich. All sorts of minerals to be found in that country, but instead of allowing it to get rich it's basically just fuelled endless civil war. The resource curse has affected quite a few African countries.

Another thing to consider is video footage. With ISIS we tend to get quite a bit of footage regularly - whether it's air strikes, ground fighting, executions, etc. We get very little of that from DRC. We do get some but it's a much less visible war, and unfortunately stories without pictures or video don't grab attention very well.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by RFowler)
Yes, but they are still a threat to us.
I'm all for ISIS being defeated but there is no threat of them invading and occupying Britain. There is the threat of terrorist attack in the form of suicide bombers and such I guess but then that is caused by our involvement there. They are only a threat to us insofar in that we have placed ourselves in the middleeast. They are a real threat to the people around them and they only exist since we created a power vacuum of sorts. They are gaining a foothold in Libya since we meddled and helped topple Gaddafi.

If we decided to start meddling in a similar way in Congo we would face similar problems and you would be calling for 'self defense' against the threat over there whilst ignoring the atrocities committed by ISIS. There is so much **** going on in the world. It's just there is big money at stake where ISIS is involved essentially. So we plaster our news with all the horrific events goign on in that region, whipping up support, whilst ignoring other parts of the world where they may be even worse atrocities being committed but with no strategic or money value to us. In some cases it is our puppets committing the atrocities! You want to mak ethe world a better place? First thing is to stop behaving appallingly yourself. It is much easier to say stop selling weapons to Saudi Arabia (who sell to ISIS) than it is to defeat ISIS on the ground.

'Self defense' is just more palatable to the public of liberal western democracies who are not as war mongering as we used to be. It doesn't matter if we are right or not, but we started it.
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username931319
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I don't care because the people's themselves are barbarous philistines that continually butcher each other.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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Rorschach II
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
there is no threat of them invading and occupying Britain.
To add onto that, the chance of one dying in a car crash (just about everything else) is far more significant than the chance dying of terrorism.

I can almost say there is no chance for someone in Britain (staying in Britain, I might add) to die from terrorism (as it's so negligible).

Spoiler:
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EDIT: I added "almost" just for diplomatic immunity; in case someone decided to go statistics on me.
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username1494226
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I think the real reason that so many of these messed up countries are ignored is for two simple reasons. To many developing nations are messed up in the first place and the issues are on such a scale that its impossible to solve. It's a sorry state of affairs and progress is literally made one step at a time. Congo is a really sad example of how bad of a state continental Africa actually is in. The West and developed nations don't help by sourcing raw materials from there which they can't trace so are indirectly funding the war and so the two groups will continue waging war against one another. They've hated each other for decades, especially after the Rwandan genocide which this is a continuation of. I think it would be incredibly awful if it were the case that they were being ignored simply because they're Africans.
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kumon
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9 replies, people really do ignore it Any practical solutions?
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User1824259
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A lot of **** happens in lazy and corrupt Africa.

The African countries need new leaders to make use of its rich natural resources and help the people lead a better, organised lives.
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