lilafrubexoxo
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Hi I'm currently doing AS German, and I don't really understand the grammar, in terms of the nominative, accusative, dative and genetive .. Can someone please explain???
I really need to get an A in the summer!!
Thanks,
Lilafrube
xoxo
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Danny.L
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(Original post by lilafrubexoxo)
Hi I'm currently doing AS German, and I don't really understand the grammar, in terms of the nominative, accusative, dative and genetive .. Can someone please explain???
I really need to get an A in the summer!!
Thanks,
Lilafrube
xoxo
Same here. Also struggle with passive and reflexive stuff :/
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Lilly112
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what exactly don't you understand about nominative, genetive etc. ?
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Nisr123
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(Original post by lilafrubexoxo)
Hi I'm currently doing AS German, and I don't really understand the grammar, in terms of the nominative, accusative, dative and genetive .. Can someone please explain???
I really need to get an A in the summer!!
Thanks,
Lilafrube
xoxo
I do AS German too and its not really about understanding it.. they are just rules. It is just memorising them and knowing when to use them... and yeah nope. I can't help you there. Just as stuck as you xD.

Can I ask you something though...? How are you revising for AS German? I want an A too xD What are you predicted? Have you prepared your speaking assessment yet? What exam board are you? Have you done any proper mocks yet? (Sorry for all the questions :P)
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Rorschach II
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(Original post by lilafrubexoxo)
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(Original post by Danny.L)
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(Original post by Nisr123)
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Later, or tomorrow when I have time I'll post a detailed post (hopefully concise), please reply to this so I see it in notifications and remember to do this.
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Danny.L
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(Original post by XcitingStuart)
Later, or tomorrow when I have time I'll post a detailed post (hopefully concise), please reply to this so I see it in notifications and remember to do this.
Thank you!
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Rorschach II
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I haven't forgotten; I spent ages on it earlier (on word), it's nearly done, I just need to do genitive. I can't access a computer at the moment to finish it, but i will be able to soon.

I'll do active & passive in a separate post.

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schmuur
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(Original post by lilafrubexoxo)
Hi I'm currently doing AS German, and I don't really understand the grammar, in terms of the nominative, accusative, dative and genetive .. Can someone please explain???
I really need to get an A in the summer!!
Thanks,
Lilafrube
xoxo
In English if we say:
Harry sent Paul a letter.
Harry is Nominative. because Harry is doing the action (ie. he is the one sending)
the letter is Akkusative. Because the letter is being sent. Without the letter, Harry could not do the sending.
Paul is Dative. he is the one receiving.

Another example.
Lola's dog ate my sandwich!
The dog is Nominative. The dog is doing the action (ie eating)
Lola is Genitive. The dog belongs to Lola. Lola herself is has nothing to do with the action.
The sandwich is akkusative. The sandwich is being eaten.

last example:
Tom's sister bought Jane flowers.
Tom is Genetive. The sister belongs to Tom.
The sister is Nominative. She is doing the buying.
Jane
is Dative. The flowers are being bought for her.
The flowers
are Akkusative. They are being bought.

I hope this helps
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Rorschach II
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I wrote it in a word document, then decided to convert it to images and watermark it. xD

Please could other people correct it, since I still only know it to an AS & a bit of an A2 standard.

I realise it looks quite daunting. Probably go through it slowly and bit by bit, and it's not as bad as it may seem.

You still would need to practice and be corrected many times.
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Rorschach II
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(Original post by lilafrubexoxo)
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(Original post by Danny.L)
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(Original post by Nisr123)
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Done. Sorry it took longer (a lot longer, but I was so bored of revision) than I said; I underestimated how long it would take and I couldn't access a computer for a while at home.

I made it hopefully user friendly (for me anyway) and long-term.

Have to admit, my post looks quite swag with those colours. :cool:
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Danny.L
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(Original post by XcitingStuart)
Done. Sorry it took longer (a lot longer, but I was so bored of revision) than I said; I underestimated how long it would take and I couldn't access a computer for a while at home.

I made it hopefully user friendly (for me anyway) and long-term.

Have to admit, my post looks quite swag with those colours. :cool:
Awesome!
Was wondering do you have any notes/knowledge of tenses?
I am REALLY struggling on past tenses such as the passive, perfekt tense and reflexive sentences. If you could possibly post any concrete notes on this it'd be great. I have trawled through online resources and cant get the hang of it.
Maybe help from another student may be clearer?
I would really, deeply appreciate it!
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Rorschach II
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(Original post by Danny.L)
Awesome!
Was wondering do you have any notes/knowledge of tenses?
I am REALLY struggling on past tenses such as the passive, perfekt tense and reflexive sentences. If you could possibly post any concrete notes on this it'd be great. I have trawled through online resources and cant get the hang of it.
Maybe help from another student may be clearer?
I would really, deeply appreciate it!
I would probably ignore kein, mein etc. at the moment; I don't think I've explained that very clearly (considering this is new to me as well.)
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Danny.L
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(Original post by XcitingStuart)
I would probably ignore kein, mein etc. at the moment; I don't think I've explained that very clearly (considering this is new to me as well.)
So do you know much about tenses?
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Rorschach II
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(Original post by Danny.L)
So do you know much about tenses?
Yes sorry it's just that I've been really busy.

I'll make a post soon.

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Rorschach II
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(Original post by Danny.L)
So do you know much about tenses?
Sorry that this was done quite quickly. I'll update and set out nice if I have time.
Before I start, I'll say they get far easier with some practice, don't be daunted and get your examples corrected etc. I doubt anyone has ever made no mistakes on their first try.
You are going to have to search up common irregular verbs and learn them off by heart.


It would be easier to explain it in English first
(made up)

I ate a banana (imperfect)
I have eaten a banana (perfect)

I was anorexic (imperfect)
I have been anorexic (perfect)

I became (imperfect)
I have become (perfect)

Notice that the "imperfect" past tense is without "had". I think the best example for explaining the differences is the "I ate/have eaten" example.

It's quite similar in German (minus kicking the 2nd verb to the end), of course once you get the hang of it.

There's two ways of doing it, but that'll be explained later.





Imperfect "ate" - No "ge-" is added to the verbs in imperfect

Simple verbs

machen "to make" - machte "ate" (you add a "t" in between the main part and the verb ending)
ich machte
du machtest

er/sie/es/man (any singular noun) machte
(notice that 1st person "I" and 3rd person "he/she/it/one (any singular noun)" will always be the same in imperfect past tense)

wir machten
ihr machtet
sie machten
Sie machten

Strong/irregular verb

gehen "to go" - ging "went"
ich ging
du gingst

er/se/es/man (any singular noun) ging
(notice that 1st person "I" and 3rd person "he/she/it/one (any singular noun)" will always be the same in imperfect past tense)

wir gingen
ihr gingt
sie gingen

er arbeitete - he worked
er kam


Perfect "have eaten"

subject + haben/sein (explained later) + content + past participle (name given to "eaten" if that makes sense)

Use "haben" if it's a model or reflective verb

Use "sein" (to be) if the verb
→ shows movement e.g. gehen/schwimmen
→ change in physiology/state
"werden"
"sein"
"bleiben" (doesn't follow pattern; just learn)
"aufwachen"
"sterben"
"einschlafen"

those are some common ones, you'll just have to search up whether they're "haben" or "sein"

verbs which have any of these don't have "ge-"

be-
ge-
ent-
emp-
ver-
zer-
-ieren

e.g. ich telefonierte/ich habe telefoniert

Er ist gestorben ("he has died")
er ist gekommen ("he has came")
er hat ... bekommen ("he has received ...")
wir haben ... bekommen ("we have received ...")

Separable verbs have the "ge-" in between e.g. "Ich habe ... mitgenommen."


Now examples!!!

Ich aß...
Ich habe gegessen...
Er aß einen Apfel
Er hat einen Apfel gegessen

Ich bin ... gewesen ("I had been")
Wir sind ... gewesen
Du bist ... gewesen

etc. etc.

model verbs

sollte/hat gesollt
musste/hat gemusst - had to
konnte/hat gekonnt
durfte/hat gedurft
wollte/hat gewollt
mochte/hat gemocht

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Previous edit Last edited by XcitingStuart; 2 weeks ago at 22:56.
At the moment about 16:01 17/04/2015

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(Original post by Danny.L)
So do you know much about tenses?

Sorry that this was done quite quickly. I'll update and set out nice if I have time.
Before I start, I'll say they get far easier with some practice, don't be daunted and get your examples corrected etc. I doubt anyone has ever made no mistakes on their first try.
You are going to have to search up common irregular verbs and learn them off by heart.


It would be easier to explain it in English first
(made up)

I ate a banana (imperfect)
I had eaten a banana (perfect)

I was anorexic (imperfect)
I had been anorexic (perfect)

I became (imperfect)
I had become (perfect)

Notice that the "imperfect" past tense is without "had". I think the best example for explaining the differences is the "I ate/had eaten" example.

It's quite similar in German (minus kicking the 2nd verb to the end), of course once you get the hang of it.

There's two ways of doing it, but that'll be explained later.





Imperfect "ate" - No "ge-" is added to the verbs in imperfect

Simple verbs

machen "to make" - machte "ate" (you add a "t" in between the main part and the verb ending)
ich machte
du machtest

er/sie/es/man (any singular noun) machte
(notice that 1st person "I" and 3rd person "he/she/it/one (any singular noun)" will always be the same in imperfect past tense)

wir machten
ihr machtet
sie machten
Sie machten

Strong/irregular verb

gehen "to go" - ging "went"
ich ging
du gingst

er/se/es/man (any singular noun) ging
(notice that 1st person "I" and 3rd person "he/she/it/one (any singular noun)" will always be the same in imperfect past tense)

wir gingen
ihr gingt
sie gingen

er arbeitete - he worked
er kam


Perfect "had eaten"

subject + haben/sein (explained later) + content + past participle (name given to "eaten" if that makes sense)

Use "haben" if it's a model or reflective verb

Use "sein" (to be) if the verb
→ shows movement e.g. gehen/schwimmen
→ change in physiology/state
"werden"
"sein"
"bleiben" (doesn't follow pattern; just learn)
"aufwachen"
"sterben"
"einschlafen"

those are some common ones, you'll just have to search up whether they're "haben" or "sein"

verbs which have any of these don't have "ge-"

be-
ge-
ent-
emp-
ver-
zer-
-ieren

e.g. ich telefonierte/ich habe telefoniert

Er ist gestorben ("he has died")
er ist gekommen ("he has came")
er hat ... bekommen ("he has received ...")
wir haben ... bekommen ("we have received ...")

Separable verbs have the "ge-" in between e.g. "Ich habe ... mitgenommen."


Now examples!!!

Ich aß...
Ich habe gegessen...
Er aß einen Apfel
Er hat einen Apfel gegessen

Ich bin ... gewesen ("I had been")
Wir sind ... gewesen
Du bist ... gewesen

etc. etc.

model verbs

sollte/hat gesollt
musste/hat gemusst - had to
konnte/hat gekonnt
durfte/hat gedurft
wollte/hat gewollt
mochte/hat gemocht

Posted from TSR Mobile

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Danny.L
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#16
(Original post by XcitingStuart)
Sorry that this was done quite quickly. I'll update and set out nice if I have time.
Before I start, I'll say they get far easier with some practice, don't be daunted and get your examples corrected etc. I doubt anyone has ever made no mistakes on their first try.
You are going to have to search up common irregular verbs and learn them off by heart.


It would be easier to explain it in English first
(made up)

I ate a banana (imperfect)
I had eaten a banana (perfect)

I was anorexic (imperfect)
I had been anorexic (perfect)

I became (imperfect)
I had become (perfect)

Notice that the "imperfect" past tense is without "had". I think the best example for explaining the differences is the "I ate/had eaten" example.

It's quite similar in German (minus kicking the 2nd verb to the end), of course once you get the hang of it.

There's two ways of doing it, but that'll be explained later.





Imperfect "ate" - No "ge-" is added to the verbs in imperfect

Simple verbs

machen "to make" - machte "ate" (you add a "t" in between the main part and the verb ending)
ich machte
du machtest

er/sie/es/man (any singular noun) machte
(notice that 1st person "I" and 3rd person "he/she/it/one (any singular noun)" will always be the same in imperfect past tense)

wir machten
ihr machtet
sie machten
Sie machten

Strong/irregular verb

gehen "to go" - ging "went"
ich ging
du gingst

er/se/es/man (any singular noun) ging
(notice that 1st person "I" and 3rd person "he/she/it/one (any singular noun)" will always be the same in imperfect past tense)

wir gingen
ihr gingt
sie gingen

er arbeitete - he worked
er kam


Perfect "had eaten"

subject + haben/sein (explained later) + content + past participle (name given to "eaten" if that makes sense)

Use "haben" if it's a model or reflective verb

Use "sein" (to be) if the verb
→ shows movement e.g. gehen/schwimmen
→ change in physiology/state
"werden"
"sein"
"bleiben" (doesn't follow pattern; just learn)
"aufwachen"
"sterben"
"einschlafen"

those are some common ones, you'll just have to search up whether they're "haben" or "sein"

verbs which have any of these don't have "ge-"

be-
ge-
ent-
emp-
ver-
zer-
-ieren

e.g. ich telefonierte/ich habe telefoniert

Er ist gestorben ("he has died")
er ist gekommen ("he has came")
er hat ... bekommen ("he has received ...")
wir haben ... bekommen ("we have received ...")

Separable verbs have the "ge-" in between e.g. "Ich habe ... mitgenommen."


Now examples!!!

Ich aß...
Ich habe gegessen...
Er aß einen Apfel
Er hat einen Apfel gegessen

Ich bin ... gewesen ("I had been")
Wir sind ... gewesen
Du bist ... gewesen

etc. etc.

model verbs

sollte/hat gesollt
musste/hat gemusst - had to
konnte/hat gekonnt
durfte/hat gedurft
wollte/hat gewollt
mochte/hat gemocht

Posted from TSR Mobile
Very helpful, will be referring to this a lot!
However, my tenses are poor so this may be stupid, but is there any way of saying "I have done" "I have eaten" opposed to I ate or I had eaten?
One last thing i promise!
Reflexive verbs and how to use them? I consistently get confused where the "sich" goes, what its different forms are such as "mich" & also find myself using dativ instead "seine" "deine" etc.
This is probably where I need the most help.
Possessive pronouns and reflexive verbs, you'd be a life saver, but great job so far!
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Rorschach II
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(Original post by Danny.L)
Very helpful, will be referring to this a lot!
However, my tenses are poor so this may be stupid, but is there any way of saying "I have done" "I have eaten" opposed to I ate or I had eaten?
One last thing i promise!
Reflexive verbs and how to use them? I consistently get confused where the "sich" goes, what its different forms are such as "mich" & also find myself using dativ instead "seine" "deine" etc.
This is probably where I need the most help.
Possessive pronouns and reflexive verbs, you'd be a life saver, but great job so far!
As in you still need to change the verb "to have/to be" to the respective subject.

e.g. Ich habe gegessen
Du hast gegessen.
Er hat gegessen.
Wir haben gegessen.

I'll carry on tomorrow.


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jayrosan
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Hi

I currently do Edexcel German As level and i have my German speaking assessment in a few weeks and i am struggling in my preparations, any particular tips on how to prepare? i've been told basically reciting pre-learned phrases won't give you the best marks in the exam.
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lilafrubexoxo
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Thank you!!!!!
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Rorschach II
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(Original post by jayrosan)
Hi

I currently do Edexcel German As level and i have my German speaking assessment in a few weeks and i am struggling in my preparations, any particular tips on how to prepare? i've been told basically reciting pre-learned phrases won't give you the best marks in the exam.
I'm not on the same exam board as you, but our teachers (well all the languages in my college) seemed to have prepared extra lessons in our own time for stuff like this.

I would recommend when practising on past papers, to bullet point key information.

Let's say it asks for advantages and disadvantages, split the page in two (we get a blank sheet of paper and 15 minutes to prepare for 2 cards in one part) label one with "V" for "Vorteile" and other side with "N" for "Nachteile". They mark more on communication than content, the content coukd literally be anything.

So if there's pictures about a waiter and an animal helper, waiters dressed in a suit, helpers dressed in more casual clothes.

Say stuff like being a waiter offers consistency (need to learn the vocab) but maybe not much career prospects etc.
More comfortable clothing when being an animal helper. You are helping animals, which is a good thing to do.

If there's a picture of a lawyer and a mechanic, say the lawyer earns more money, but you need better qualifications.
Mechanic means you'll have a better social life (doesn't have to be true, just communicated well and not bizarre), but has less career prospects.

You can say one has better career prospects and the other one have worse, but try to avoid it unless you don't know what to say.

I don't really know what else to say, because your teacher should be going though this with you, but I emphasise use bullet points. Going through it with a teacher would definitely boost grades; I was clueless before.

For the conversation part, write a short SEPARATE essay about hobbies, part time jobs, holidays, future plans etc. Get them corrected and learn them off by heart, but not too much detail so they could ask easier questions about it. Write possible questions with answers etc.

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