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Physics experiment - specific heat capacity of water watch

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    Hi!
    I be done an experiment to investigate the change in the specific heat capacity of water by changing the concentration of the water, accordingly. I've used a heating element to heat the water and I've insulated the beaker properly.

    So, I read the current and voltage from the multimeters. So, I can find the energy supplied, by using
    P= I V and then power = energy / time

    We also know that E= mct
    So are these equations equal?? Or will I need the efficiency of my system?!?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by rishabharora)
    Hi!
    I be done an experiment to investigate the change in the specific heat capacity of water by changing the concentration of the water, accordingly. I've used a heating element to heat the water and I've insulated the beaker properly.

    So, I read the current and voltage from the multimeters. So, I can find the energy supplied, by using
    P= I V and then power = energy / time

    We also know that E= mct
    So are these equations equal?? Or will I need the efficiency of my system?!?

    Thanks
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    How would you calculate the efficiency? I'd probably just insulate everything well and equate IVt = mcT
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    How would you calculate the efficiency? I'd probably just insulate everything well and equate IVt = mcT
    Maybe calculate the energy input and energy output?? Not exactly sure. But is the Ivt = mct a correct method?
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    (Original post by rishabharora)
    Maybe calculate the energy input and energy output?? Not exactly sure. But is the Ivt = mct a correct method?
    Should be, maybe use a \theta for temperature to stop it getting confused with time, but yeah. Both equate to the energy the water has gained as heat.

    My point about calculating efficiency is that you're already measuring the energy output in the form of how much the water heats up. Unless you have some very accurate way of working it out from theory, I don't think there's much you can do but assume that your experiment is 100% efficient.
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    Input Power = VI

    Output Power = \dfrac{mc\Delta T}{t}

    So considering you are trying to find the specific heat capacity, chances are they want you to assume 100% efficiency, seeing as you would calculate the efficiency using the two above formulas, of which the value you are trying to find is unknown.
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    Yeah, so I'll equate the formulas and assume 100% efficiency

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