JediHamster
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I have been accepted to both universities to read/study Economics with the LSE giving me a conditional offer(A*AA+Pass in A2 FM) while Cornell, just like other US universities, an implicit unconditional offer. It would be great if anyone kind enough would give me some inputs on how both schools would stand in Economics or in the Social Sciences. I have never thought of getting any of the Ivy League in my application given the last minute nature of my unedited application essays, forgive me for my lack of sufficient prior research.

Financing is not an issue, I'm currently on a full government sponsorship (somewhere in Asia) which includes every relevant expenses during my studies. I am also not concerned about the flexibility factor, given that my sponsors dictate that I have to do Economics for my undergraduate degree regardless.

How would both universities stand in terms of prospects of graduate entry in the future? How do both fare in the market - banking, government etc (in regards to Europe, North America and maybe Asian countries as well)? Specifically also, how do Central Banks, policy makers or think tanks view economists from either schools?

Any valuable answers to any unmentioned questions/issues would also be useful. Please and thank you, everyone!
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BnThereDnThat
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(Original post by JediHamster)
I have been accepted to both universities to read/study Economics with the LSE giving me a conditional offer(A*AA+Pass in A2 FM) while Cornell, just like other US universities, an implicit unconditional offer. It would be great if anyone kind enough would give me some inputs on how both schools would stand in Economics or in the Social Sciences. I have never thought of getting any of the Ivy League in my application given the last minute nature of my unedited application essays, forgive me for my lack of sufficient prior research.

Financing is not an issue, I'm currently on a full government sponsorship (somewhere in Asia) which includes every relevant expenses during my studies. I am also not concerned about the flexibility factor, given that my sponsors dictate that I have to do Economics for my undergraduate degree regardless.

How would both universities stand in terms of prospects of graduate entry in the future? How do both fare in the market - banking, government etc (in regards to Europe, North America and maybe Asian countries as well)? Specifically also, how do Central Banks, policy makers or think tanks view economists from either schools?

Any valuable answers to any unmentioned questions/issues would also be useful. Please and thank you, everyone!
Hello,
Will give you my 2 pennies based on my experience: I did my BSc in Econ at LSE, and my Masters at Oxford, and PhD at Cambridge. My brother went to Princeton to double-major in Engineering and Economics, so I used to tutor my brother quite a lot and am familiar with the curriculum in Princeton and other top US universities (I also taught in another institution).
Between LSE and Cornell for Econ I would most certainly choose LSE. Don't even think twice. I'm not saying this out of bias, but due to the following:
1) Cornell is an amazing university, but it doesn't have a strong emphasis on the social sciences in general. Incidentally many years ago I also considered Cornell for economics but chose not to apply in the end. I think Cornell is excellent for things such as engineering and medicine but for economics it doesn't match LSE in terms of quality of department and teaching. Now if it were Harvard or Chicago or Stanford it'd be a different story.
2) For graduate entry in economics a good degree from Cornell would not necessarily undermine you, but a first from LSE in Economics would open doors both in the UK and the US for postgraduate work.
3) For banking outside the US, LSE wins hands down imo. Its reputation in economics is only matched/exceeded by Harvard, Stanford, MIT, and Chicago in my view. In the US, a good degree from Cornell (especially in New York, the centre of US IB) would be good, but I still think that an LSE degree would be better for prospects in New York's IB. These headhunters would most certainly know of LSE and the reputation of its economics department, and would know that its department is better than Cornell's.
4) I worked for multilateral institutions and my LSE degree certainly helped, as did my postgraduate qualifications. I'm not saying a Cornell degree won't help your prospects, but I do believe that LSE is superior in Economics irrespective of career choice.

Having said that, the reason I mentioned my brother and Princeton is because in all honesty, the economics curriculum at US universities is inferior to LSE's in my view at undergraduate level. My brother was going over material in his 3rd year that I learnt in my 1st year at LSE. There's more rigour and specialisation in LSE compared to the US universities, and while Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, MIT, and Chicago are superior for postgraduate work imo, I still think an undergraduate degree from LSE, UCL or Cambridge in Economics provides the ideal foundation to pursue a career as an economist.

Just my 2 pennies hope this helps.
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Mr. Roxas
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This mostly depends on where you want to work after earning your degree. If you intend to work in the US, go for Cornell. If you want to work in the UK, for for LSE.

In Asia, either degree will get you where you'd like to go. Both are highly respected.

Personally, I'd go for Cornell as American education system offers more freedom and electives. Add to that the college experience you'll gain of attending an Ivy school. But either uni will be fine. There isn't a wrong choice here.
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