Why are lipids not considered polymers? Watch

Tj789
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Ive got a few reasons but feel that they are inadequate:
  • Lipids are not made up of monomers, thus cannot join to make polymers (but I dont understand why they are not made up of polymers my only explanation would be is that glycerol and fatty acids are very different from each other and are not big
  • The small molecules in lipids are not very different from each other, for a polymer to form the molecules need to be similar


Theres something about repeating units too?
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[email protected]
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I think the main problem is, that a polymer needs to have a repeat unit, i.e. a specific section which is repeated consecutively within the molecule. There are three basic types of polymer - condensation polymers (polyesters and polyamides), and addition polymers (from the breaking of a C=C). Lipids such as triglycerides are made up of two units and do have an ester linkage as would be found in polyesters, (COOC), but do not have a repeat unit. I hope this answers your question.
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Kallisto
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I agree with [email protected]'s statement that lipids have no repeat units as sequences, the sequences are just long carbon chains.

Moreover the polymers are synthetic materials, that is to say they are not exist in nature. Lipids are natural products, they are exist in nature.
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Exon
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Posting to reaffirm the notion that polymers are made of repeating units.

(Original post by Kallisto)
Moreover the polymers are synthetic materials, that is to say they are not exist in nature. Lipids are natural products, they are exist in nature.
This is not the reason. Although the repeating units in macromolecules like DNA and polypeptides have variable groups, they are still made of repeating units (nucleotides and amino acids respectively) and are therefore considered polymers.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Exon)
(...)
This is not the reason. Although the repeating units in macromolecules like DNA and polypeptides have variable groups, they are still made of repeating units (nucleotides and amino acids respectively) and are therefore considered polymers.
Yes, you are right. The fact that the DNA has repeating saccharide, phosphate molecules and the named DNA basis (adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine) made the DNA to a polymer. The same applies to proteins which have repeating units as well (the peptide groups (OCNH) with different residues). Thanks for clarification, Exon! I have really forgotten to consider these natural products in my explanation.
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