rm_27
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hey guys,

I'm revising CHD, and the effect salt has on it. In my book it says that salt decreases the water potential of your blood, which results in more water being held in the blood thus blood pressure increases.

If the water potential has been reduced, surely that means less water is in the blood and more solute (salt)?

Also, how does hypertension and how it damages the lining of the arteries result in CHD?
0
reply
Tarte Tatin
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Water moves by osmosis from an area of high water potential to an area of low water potential. Because salt decreases the water potential, this means water will remain where the water potential is low. No, there isn't less water in the blood; there is simply a lower concentration as there is a higher concentration of salt. I hope this makes sense.

Sorry, I'm not sure about the other question.
0
reply
rm_27
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by Tarte Tatin)
Water moves by osmosis from an area of high water potential to an area of low water potential. Because salt decreases the water potential, this means water will remain where the water potential is low. No, there isn't less water in the blood; there is simply a lower concentration as there is a higher concentration of salt. I hope this makes sense.

Sorry, I'm not sure about the other question.
Thanks dude, makes sense! Are you doing A Level?
0
reply
Tarte Tatin
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by rm_27)
Thanks dude, makes sense! Are you doing A Level?
AS (OCR)
0
reply
rm_27
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by Tarte Tatin)
AS (OCR)
Ah same! How is it going?
0
reply
Tarte Tatin
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by rm_27)
Ah same! How is it going?
Not too bad Mainly coming out with Bs and Cs in past papers. It's the key words and not understanding questions properly that are my downfalls What about you?
0
reply
rm_27
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by Tarte Tatin)
Not too bad Mainly coming out with Bs and Cs in past papers. It's the key words and not understanding questions properly that are my downfalls What about you?
Yeeah, I feel you. I did a mock, and got a B. Really want the A though, but finding it to be quite challenging. I think I tend to over think a lot of the questions sometimes, and need to brush up on Food and Health.
1
reply
Harantony
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by rm_27)
Hey guys,

I'm revising CHD, and the effect salt has on it. In my book it says that salt decreases the water potential of your blood, which results in more water being held in the blood thus blood pressure increases.

If the water potential has been reduced, surely that means less water is in the blood and more solute (salt)?
As Tarte Tatin said, a reduced water potential doesn't mean there's less water in the blood, it means that the concentration of water has reduced - there is a greater proportion of salt molecules compared to water than before.

(Original post by rm_27)
Also, how does hypertension and how it damages the lining of the arteries result in CHD?
Not sure what you mean by "how does hypertension" - I'm guessing you're asking why it happens? If so, it's due to many reasons: lots of times, it's idiopathic (no one knows why it happens). Blood pressure generally goes up with age, and smoking and poor diet along with little exercise can increase blood pressure.

Having hypertension can put strain on your arteries: imagine how blood is constantly pushing and flowing faster against their walls - it will increase the chance of the endothelium (wall) of the arteries getting damaged. There's also the fact that the higher your blood pressure, the higher your cholesterol etc. tends to be, which also increases the chance of CHD. Once your arteries are damaged, LDLs can move into the wall - the immune system targets the LDL and foam cells start to form, which causes fatty streaks. These build into plaques, causing atherosclerosis. This can then lead to CHD as vessels become occluded.
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
Theoretically, its as stated above.

In reality: high salt intake barely effects blood pressure at all. In the TOPH I and II trials decreasing salt intake by 25-30% resulted in a blood pressure fall of just 1.2/0.7mmHg (you will recall that normal blood pressure is about 120/70, so this fall is just 1%).

However other studies suggest that halving your salt intake drops your stroke rate by a full 23% and heart attack risk by 17%. Blood pressure medications can change your blood pressure by a lot more than 1% but do not have such a great effect on atherosclerosis as reducing salt does. So it seems likely that salt increases deaths from cardiovascular disease in some way other than increasing blood pressure. Your two questions aren't necessarily related.

Just FYI.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (172)
44.1%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (43)
11.03%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (32)
8.21%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (83)
21.28%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (38)
9.74%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (22)
5.64%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed