Singapore bans protests at Free-Speech Park Watch

Tawheed
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The Singapore administration has indefinitely banned protest rallies and public meetings at the country's sole free-speech park, following the death of the founding father, Lee Kuan Yew.In a surprise move hours after Lee’s death, the National Parks Board declared Speakers' Corner, an area located within Hong Lim Park, as one of the designated community centers for remembering and honoring the late former prime minister."As such, we will not be able to accept any applications to use Speakers’ Corner during this time," said the board, which also manages the site, in a statement on its website.Meanwhile, Home Affairs Minister Teo Chee Hean revoked a legal provision allowing public gatherings and protests at the site.The zone, located in the heart of Singapore’s central business district, opened in 2000 and is modeled on the free-speech area of London’s famous Hyde Park.Only Singapore citizens and permanent residents and citizens are allowed to take part in protest gatherings in the area without police permits. Speakers must avoid inciting religious or racial hatred.




Policemen watch as people queue up to pay tribute with messages and flowers at the entrance to the Istana presidential palace following the death of former prime minister Lee Kuan Yew in Singapore on March 23, 2015.(AFP photo)Lee, the city-state's prime minister from 1959 to 1990, who transformed Singapore from a small port city into a wealthy global hub, died at the age of 91 early Monday.Singapore has declared seven days of national mourning following the death.Lee's body is to lie in state at parliament from Wednesday to Saturday and the period of national mourning will culminate in a state funeral next Sunday.



People gather to pay tribute to former prime minister Lee Kuan Yew in Singapore on March 23, 2015. (AFP photo)The former prime minister is widely respected as the architect of Singapore's prosperity. However, Lee was criticized for his tough stance on dissidents and political factions opposed to his People’s Action Party.Critics say freedom of speech was tightly restricted and political opponents were targeted by the courts during his three-decade long rule

http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2015/03...ts-at-Lim-Park
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Tawheed
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Freedom of Expression, Peaceful Assembly, and Association

The rights to freedom of expression, peaceful assembly, and association are limited in Singapore in the name of security, public order, morality, and racial and religious harmony. The restrictions are interpreted broadly.
In June, the government added restrictions on Internet news websites by requiring submission of a S$50,000 (US$39,430) bond and annual licensing for any website averaging at least one Singapore-related news article a week, and receiving a monthly average of 50,000 unique visits from Singapore-based users. Sites determined by the Media Development Authority (MDA) to meet the criteria must, on notification, remove “prohibited content” or face forfeiture of their bond. Any content in the article, or associated readers’ comments, which the MDA decides violates broadly defined conceptions of public interest, public security, or national harmony can trigger a take-down order that requires sites to remove the content within 24 hours. Although the MDA said bloggers would not be affected, it added that "if [blogs] take on the nature of news sites, we will take a closer look and evaluate them accordingly.”
Printed materials continue to be regulated by the Newspaper and Printing Presses Act, which requires all newspapers to renew their registration annually and limits circulation of foreign newspapers which the government determines “engage in the domestic politics of Singapore.” The two corporations that dominate media regularly take a pro-government stance. Media Corp, owned by a government investment company, dominates broadcasting. Singapore Press Holdings Limited (SPH) dominates print media, and although a private company, the government controls appointment of its shareholders.
Singapore uses criminal defamation and contempt of court charges to rein in criticism of the government and the ruling People’s Action Party. In July, Leslie Chew, a cartoonist posting his work on “Demon-cratic Singapore,” his Facebook page, was charged with “scandalizing the judiciary” for four cartoons that authorities said implied the Singapore judiciary was not impartial or independent. In exchange for dropping the charges, Chew apologized, took down the cartoons and accompanying reader comments, and agreed not to “put up any post or comic strip … that amounts to contempt of court.”
Under the Public Order Act 2009, Singapore requires a permit for any cause-related assembly in any public place or to which members of the general public are invited, or any procession of two or more persons. Grounds for denial of the permit are broad and left largely to the discretion of police. They include the likelihood that the assembly would cause disorder or a “public nuisance,” lead to property damage, obstruct roads, “plac[e] the safety of any person in jeopardy,” or cause enmity between different groups in Singapore. Demonstrations and rallies are restricted to the city-state’s Speakers’ Corner, require advance notice, can only be organized by Singapore citizens, and can only be attended by citizens and permanent residents.
Associations with more than 10 members must seek approval to exist, and the Registrar of Societies has broad authority to deny registration if he determines that the group could be “prejudicial to public peace, welfare or good order.”
Yale-NUS College, a joint initiative of Yale University and the National University of Singapore, opened its doors to its first classes in August 2013. College President Pericles Lewis has said that students can express their views but will not be allowed to organize political protests on campus or form partisan political societies, thereby undermining human rights principles that are a crucial part of a liberal arts education.


http://www.hrw.org/world-report/2014...ters/singapore
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shawn_o1
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Lee Kwan Yew has made Singapore the country it is today - transformed the lives of thousands of Singaporeans, and made the country a much better place to live in. The People's Action Party has done more for the people of Singapore than they could ever do, and as a proud Singaporean myself, I am grateful to Lee for the service he has offered. Rest in peace, Lee.
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Tawheed
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(Original post by shawn_o1)
Lee Kwan Yew has made Singapore the country it is today - transformed the lives of thousands of Singaporeans, and made the country a much better place to live in. The People's Action Party has done more for the people of Singapore than they could ever do, and as a proud Singaporean myself, I am grateful to Lee for the service he has offered. Rest in peace, Lee.
I agree, but do you think the racism, racism and discrimination against malay's and indians by the chinese majority(apparently), lack of freedom of speech and living under a dictatorship is what singapore now wants to take forward?
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shawn_o1
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(Original post by Tawheed)
I agree, but do you think the racism, racism and discrimination against malay's and indians by the chinese majority(apparently), lack of freedom of speech and living under a dictatorship is what singapore now wants to take forward?
I've checked; there hasn't been a racial conflict in Singapore since 1969 (2013 riot was caused by alcohol). Our government tries its very best to integrate all three groups together.

What dictatorship? Each of us have enough rights in Singapore as it is (and our education system makes us aware of our responsibilities as we grow older). It's a sharp contrast to the UK (which I've been in for secondary school and uni) where parents and teachers don't seem to know how important it is that their children respect others
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Tawheed
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(Original post by shawn_o1)
I've checked; there hasn't been a racial conflict in Singapore since 1969 (2013 riot was caused by alcohol). Our government tries its very best to integrate all three groups together.

What dictatorship? Each of us have enough rights in Singapore as it is (and our education system makes us aware of our responsibilities as we grow older). It's a sharp contrast to the UK (which I've been in for secondary school and uni) where parents and teachers don't seem to know how important it is that their children respect others
I have heard a lot of eye-witness cases of indirect hidden racism i.e malay's in the army being asked to do second-class jobs, people stating 'you must know mandrian' in many jobs where mandrian is not needed to throw out the malays and indians, discrimination etc
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shawn_o1
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(Original post by Tawheed)
I have heard a lot of eye-witness cases of indirect hidden racism i.e malay's in the army being asked to do second-class jobs, people stating 'you must know mandrian' in many jobs where mandrian is not needed to throw out the malays and indians, discrimination etc
"Many jobs"? Most professions in Singapore don't even need Mandarin. I did an internship for 3 months in Singapore and I was able to get away with not being fluent in Mandarin (wasted it all on living in the UK and not being talkative enough). I know there are traditional hawker market/food court workers who serve the elderly Chinese that can't speak English, which is why Mandarin is required in those cases.

Army? Oh, I'm one of the lucky ones who got exempted because of autism. So I can't comment on the treatment of Malay soldiers
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by shawn_o1)
Lee Kwan Yew has made Singapore the country it is today - transformed the lives of thousands of Singaporeans, and made the country a much better place to live in. The People's Action Party has done more for the people of Singapore than they could ever do, and as a proud Singaporean myself, I am grateful to Lee for the service he has offered. Rest in peace, Lee.
if Tawheed is linking to press tv reports and his other posts are pro Assad, I bet you'd find homosexual hangings somewhere on his hard drive.
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Baron of Sealand
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(Original post by shawn_o1)
Lee Kwan Yew has made Singapore the country it is today - transformed the lives of thousands of Singaporeans, and made the country a much better place to live in. The People's Action Party has done more for the people of Singapore than they could ever do, and as a proud Singaporean myself, I am grateful to Lee for the service he has offered. Rest in peace, Lee.
This argument worked decades ago, but not now. Lee has brought Singapore up to satisfy the lowest level of the hierarchy of needs, and nothing more.

To each his own, I guess.

(Original post by MatureStudent36)
if Tawheed is linking to press tv reports and his other posts are pro Assad, I bet you'd find homosexual hangings somewhere on his hard drive.
Now I wouldn't say this would be accurate. Homosexuals might not have been his favourite people, I think it was just general coonservativeness that had made him kept the criminalisation.
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limetang
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This is shocking why? Singapore is a semi-authoritarian state. It is what it is.

What's truly subversive is the doublethink we have in the West, where we are told we live in free democracies and then have freedoms of speech etc. Taken away.
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Tawheed
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
if Tawheed is linking to press tv reports and his other posts are pro Assad, I bet you'd find homosexual hangings somewhere on his hard drive.
It's upsetting to be misquoted. I am not pro-assad and never have been. However, i am a staunch enemy of ISIS, and consider ISIS the far greater threat, and stick to the facts.

I won't reply to anymore provocations from you.
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seeXYZ
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(Original post by Tawheed)
I agree, but do you think the racism, racism and discrimination against malay's and indians by the chinese majority(apparently), lack of freedom of speech and living under a dictatorship is what singapore now wants to take forward?

I think their system prevent racism(stupidity) to grow in any meaningful way. The system instilled integration - "You are not Chinese, you are not Indian, you are not Malay. You are Singaporean."

If they had Western Style multi-party democracy, this ethnic division will form the party line, interest groups and allow the stupidity from each community "a door into power" so to say. The "freedom" you ask for, will eventually lead to ethnic strife at best, and disintegration at worst.

Given the issues we have with minority integration (particularly disenfranchised Muslims) in the UK and EU, I think we need a lesson in integration from the Singaporeans.
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seeXYZ
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LKY interviewed on "Top 10 Hot Button" issues:

Remarkably frank...and more so, impressive ... its long but worth the time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihiE4oGyYlQ
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