How could I improve my geography essay so it gets the highest mark possible? Watch

Ben Johnson
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Here it is

Geography Assessment

Annie, who is unemployed, was a skilled fabric machinist and is now looking for work outside of the clothing industry. She lives in Cheshire, UK with her husband and two children. Rosa, aged 16, was hired 5 months ago as a fabric machinist in a factory called Manila Fabrics with 500 other people in Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Why is Rosa doing Annie’s job?

Rosa works 6 days a week, but if there is a higher demand, it can be 7 days. Rosa is forced to work overtime, sometimes until 2am. If she refused, she would lose her job. Even though she works hard, she earns a mere £4 in a 12-hour day. In fact, Rosa would have to work 100 hours to earn enough money for a garment she is sewing. As a result, she finds it hard to survive off her earnings. Rosa’s company does, however, give her a room to sleep in, albeit with five others. Working conditions in the UK are obviously better. Workers have the right to have time off and are able to pick hours that suit them.

A UK clothing manufacturer named Dewhirst Fabrics in Cheshire, where Annie worked, closed down in 2000, making her redundant. Before it closed down, it produced clothes for Marks and Spencer. 90% of its business had been for M&S. Dewhirst Fabrics moved its production overseas to countries like the Philippines where costs were cheaper. Many other factories did this. In 1990, 75% of the clothes sold in M&S were made in the UK, but now it is only 30% and is still falling. Why are factories moving overseas?

M&S’s profits were declining and stockholders were angry. So they combated this by lowering their prices. But, in order to do this, they would have to pay their workers less. A lot of their factories were moved to less economically developed countries (LEDCs), where they could pay their employees much less. M&S’s profits are now steadily increasing.

Rosa would like to give up working for Manila Fabrics and go back to her home village, which is 310 miles away, but she cannot because there are no jobs there. Manila Fabrics promised she would earn enough money to send home, but she was disappointed when she began her work. M&S are not the only company to produce their goods in LEDCs. Apple Computers (China), Walmart (China) and lot of other clothing companies produce their goods in China, India, Bangladesh and of course, the Philippines. Businesses do whatever it takes to maximise profit, even if that means taking advantage of people like Rosa who desperately need money.
0
reply
A.P.L.C
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by Ben Johnson)
Here it is

Geography Assessment

Annie, who is unemployed, was a skilled fabric machinist and is now looking for work outside of the clothing industry. She lives in Cheshire, UK with her husband and two children. Rosa, aged 16, was hired 5 months ago as a fabric machinist in a factory called Manila Fabrics with 500 other people in Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Why is Rosa doing Annie’s job?

Rosa works 6 days a week, but if there is a higher demand, it can be 7 days. Rosa is forced to work overtime, sometimes until 2am. If she refused, she would lose her job. Even though she works hard, she earns a mere £4 in a 12-hour day. In fact, Rosa would have to work 100 hours to earn enough money for a garment she is sewing. As a result, she finds it hard to survive off her earnings. Rosa’s company does, however, give her a room to sleep in, albeit with five others. Working conditions in the UK are obviously better. Workers have the right to have time off and are able to pick hours that suit them.

A UK clothing manufacturer named Dewhirst Fabrics in Cheshire, where Annie worked, closed down in 2000, making her redundant. Before it closed down, it produced clothes for Marks and Spencer. 90% of its business had been for M&S. Dewhirst Fabrics moved its production overseas to countries like the Philippines where costs were cheaper. Many other factories did this. In 1990, 75% of the clothes sold in M&S were made in the UK, but now it is only 30% and is still falling. Why are factories moving overseas?

M&S’s profits were declining and stockholders were angry. So they combated this by lowering their prices. But, in order to do this, they would have to pay their workers less. A lot of their factories were moved to less economically developed countries (LEDCs), where they could pay their employees much less. M&S’s profits are now steadily increasing.

Rosa would like to give up working for Manila Fabrics and go back to her home village, which is 310 miles away, but she cannot because there are no jobs there. Manila Fabrics promised she would earn enough money to send home, but she was disappointed when she began her work. M&S are not the only company to produce their goods in LEDCs. Apple Computers (China), Walmart (China) and lot of other clothing companies produce their goods in China, India, Bangladesh and of course, the Philippines. Businesses do whatever it takes to maximise profit, even if that means taking advantage of people like Rosa who desperately need money.
I thought China and India were NICs, not LEDCs...
0
reply
hydrogirl_13
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
maybe write more background on the type of countries they are from and the industry, including the rise of outsourcing and cheaper labour, materials, harsher working climates etc.
I.e in the Philippines cheap labour is prevalent because of x y and z, whereas in the UK labour is more expensive etc
0
reply
jamestg
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by Ben Johnson)
Here it is

Geography Assessment

Annie, who is unemployed, was a skilled fabric machinist and is now looking for work outside of the clothing industry. She lives in Cheshire, UK with her husband and two children. Rosa, aged 16, was hired 5 months ago as a fabric machinist in a factory called Manila Fabrics with 500 other people in Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Why is Rosa doing Annie’s job?

Rosa works 6 days a week, but if there is a higher demand, it can be 7 days. Rosa is forced to work overtime, sometimes until 2am. If she refused, she would lose her job. Even though she works hard, she earns a mere £4 in a 12-hour day. In fact, Rosa would have to work 100 hours to earn enough money for a garment she is sewing. As a result, she finds it hard to survive off her earnings. Rosa’s company does, however, give her a room to sleep in, albeit with five others. Working conditions in the UK are obviously better. Workers have the right to have time off and are able to pick hours that suit them.

A UK clothing manufacturer named Dewhirst Fabrics in Cheshire, where Annie worked, closed down in 2000, making her redundant. Before it closed down, it produced clothes for Marks and Spencer. 90% of its business had been for M&S. Dewhirst Fabrics moved its production overseas to countries like the Philippines where costs were cheaper. Many other factories did this. In 1990, 75% of the clothes sold in M&S were made in the UK, but now it is only 30% and is still falling. Why are factories moving overseas?

M&S’s profits were declining and stockholders were angry. So they combated this by lowering their prices. But, in order to do this, they would have to pay their workers less. A lot of their factories were moved to less economically developed countries (LEDCs), where they could pay their employees much less. M&S’s profits are now steadily increasing.

Rosa would like to give up working for Manila Fabrics and go back to her home village, which is 310 miles away, but she cannot because there are no jobs there. Manila Fabrics promised she would earn enough money to send home, but she was disappointed when she began her work. M&S are not the only company to produce their goods in LEDCs. Apple Computers (China), Walmart (China) and lot of other clothing companies produce their goods in China, India, Bangladesh and of course, the Philippines. Businesses do whatever it takes to maximise profit, even if that means taking advantage of people like Rosa who desperately need money.
Overall it is quite good.

Points for Improvement:

- you should call them NICs really, not LEDCs...

- not only is it cheaper, but easier with more lenient policies such as no real limit for working hours, more working hours = more goods = more money

- the factories can also be bigger, bigger factories = more goods = more money

- more people can be employed, more people = more, better quality goods = more money

- you are not mentioning anything about the value of money, although their wage is unfair they are typically paid much more than most people in the country (Nike in Vietnam - workers are paid the same as doctors) so I wouldn't say they are taking advantage of them, the companies do good things and build better infrastructure and provide jobs so families have income. I would say they are taking advantages of the country, not the people.

- mention why she was disappointed if you can

But generally very good, I perhaps was being a little harsh but if I want the extra marks - I'm always told to be harsh on myself!
0
reply
Bamidele
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Ben Johnson)
Here it is

Geography Assessment
Annie, who is unemployed, was a skilled fabric machinist or workers
and is now looking for work outside of the clothing industry. She lives in Cheshire, UK with her husband and two children. Rosa, aged 16, was hired 5 months ago as a fabric machinist in a factory called Manila Fabrics with 500 other people in Manila, the capital of the Philippines. Why is Rosa doing Annie’s job?

Rosa works 6 days a week, but if there is a higher demand, it can be 7 days. Rosa is forced to work overtime, sometimes until 2am. If she refused, she would lose her job. Even though she works hard, she earns a mere £4 in a 12-hour day. In fact, Rosa would have to work 100 hours to earn enough money for a garment she is sewing. As a result, she finds it hard to survive off her earnings. Rosa’s company does, however, give her a room to sleep in, albeit with five others. Working conditions in the UK are obviously better. Workers have the right to have time off and are able to pick hours that suit them.

A UK clothing manufacturer named Dewhirst Fabrics in Cheshire, where Annie worked, closed down in 2000, making her redundant. Before it closed down, it produced clothes for Marks and Spencer. 90% of its business had been for M&S. Dewhirst Fabrics moved its production overseas to countries like the Philippines where costs were cheaper. Many other factories did this. In 1990, 75% of the clothes sold in M&S were made in the UK, but now it is only 30% and is still falling. Why are factories moving overseas?

M&S’s profits were declining and stockholders were angry. So they combated this by lowering their prices. But, in order to do this, they would have to pay their workers less. A lot of their factories were moved to less economically developed countries (LEDCs), where they could pay their employees much less. M&S’s profits are now steadily increasing.

Rosa would like to give up working for Manila Fabrics and go back to her home village, which is 310 miles away, but she cannot because there are no jobs there. Manila Fabrics promised she would earn enough money to send home, but she was disappointed when she began her work. M&S are not the only company to produce their goods in LEDCs. Apple Computers (China), Walmart (China) and lot of other clothing companies produce their goods in China, India, Bangladesh and of course, the Philippines. Businesses do whatever it takes to maximise profit, even if that means taking advantage of people like Rosa who desperately need money.
ok
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    PGCE Open day Postgraduate
    Tue, 3 Mar '20
  • University of Bradford
    Postgraduate Open day/Evening Postgraduate
    Tue, 3 Mar '20
  • Queen's University Belfast
    Postgraduate LIVE Masters & PhD Study Fair Postgraduate
    Wed, 4 Mar '20

Do you get study leave?

Yes- I like it (500)
59.81%
Yes- I don't like it (43)
5.14%
No- I want it (237)
28.35%
No- I don't want it (56)
6.7%

Watched Threads

View All