beth16x
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Hello

I'm study English Lang/Lit (WJEC) with the main text in the exam being Wuthering Heights. I was just wondering whether anyone has read/studied the novel and can suggest some useful quotes which represent some of the important themes? Sorry I know it's a bit of a general question but any help would be appreciated!

Thank you in advance
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Shadesofgrey
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Here are a few. These all relate to the main themes.

*It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him; and that, not because he’s handsome, Nelly, but because he’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same, and [Edgar’s] is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.


* But Mr. Heathcliff forms a singular contrast to his abode and style of living. He is a dark-skinned gypsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman, that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure—and rather morose. Possibly, some people might suspect him of a degree of under-bred pride; I have a sympathetic chord within that tells me it is nothing of the sort: I know, by instinct, his reserve springs from an aversion to showy displays of feeling—to manifestations of mutual kindliness. He’ll love and hate, equally under cover, and esteem it a species of impertinence to be loved or hated again—No, I’m running on too fast—I bestow my own attributes over-liberally on him.


**
The ledge, where I placed my candle, had a few mildewed books piled up in one corner; and it was covered with writing scratched on the paint. This writing, however, was nothing but a name repeated in all kinds of characters, large and small—Catherine Earnshaw, here and there varied to Catherine Heathcliff, and then again to Catherine Linton. In vapid listlessness I leant my head against the window, and continued spelling over Catherine Earnshaw—Heathcliff—Linton, till my eyes closed; but they had not rested five minutes when a glare of white letters started from the dark, as vivid as spectres—the air swarmed with Catherines; and rousing myself to dispel the obtrusive name, I discovered my candle wick reclining on one of the antique volumes, and perfuming the place with an odour of roasted calf-skin.

My sister (also in A-Levels) is studying WH right now and gets lots of help from this site. They might have stuff on Wuthering in their news. I haven't read Wuthering in a while so cannot say much more, but I know that these teachers might be able to help you with this. Good luck
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beth16x
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(Original post by Shadesofgrey)
Here are a few. These all relate to the main themes.

*It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him; and that, not because he’s handsome, Nelly, but because he’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same, and [Edgar’s] is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.


* But Mr. Heathcliff forms a singular contrast to his abode and style of living. He is a dark-skinned gypsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman, that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure—and rather morose. Possibly, some people might suspect him of a degree of under-bred pride; I have a sympathetic chord within that tells me it is nothing of the sort: I know, by instinct, his reserve springs from an aversion to showy displays of feeling—to manifestations of mutual kindliness. He’ll love and hate, equally under cover, and esteem it a species of impertinence to be loved or hated again—No, I’m running on too fast—I bestow my own attributes over-liberally on him.


**
The ledge, where I placed my candle, had a few mildewed books piled up in one corner; and it was covered with writing scratched on the paint. This writing, however, was nothing but a name repeated in all kinds of characters, large and small—Catherine Earnshaw, here and there varied to Catherine Heathcliff, and then again to Catherine Linton. In vapid listlessness I leant my head against the window, and continued spelling over Catherine Earnshaw—Heathcliff—Linton, till my eyes closed; but they had not rested five minutes when a glare of white letters started from the dark, as vivid as spectres—the air swarmed with Catherines; and rousing myself to dispel the obtrusive name, I discovered my candle wick reclining on one of the antique volumes, and perfuming the place with an odour of roasted calf-skin.

My sister (also in A-Levels) is studying WH right now and gets lots of help from this site. They might have stuff on Wuthering in their news. I haven't read Wuthering in a while so cannot say much more, but I know that these teachers might be able to help you with this. Good luck
Thank you so much that's very helpful! I really appreciate it
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The Chard
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Haven't managed to finish this but its just a few quotes on each theme. The page reference link to the Wordsworth classics additional of Wuthering Heights
1. Revenge – ‘He [Hindley] has been blaming our father (how dared he?) for treating H.
[Heathcliff] too liberally; and swears he will reduce him to his right place.’
(Catherine talks about what Heathcliff will do –Pg15 30%)

- ‘I'm trying to settle how I shall pay Hindley back. I don't care how long I wait, if I can only do it at last. I hope he will not die before I do!’
(Heathcliff – Pg42 95%)

- ‘I will have it back; and I'll have his gold too; and then his blood; and hell shall have his soul!’

- ‘
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The Chard
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1. Love – ‘She was much too fond of Heathcliff. The greatest punishment we could invent for
her was to keep her separate from him: yet she got chided more than any of us on his account.’
(Nelly – Pg29 50%)

- ‘It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he's more myself than I am’
(Catherine – Pg57 90%)

- ‘My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff!’
(Catherine – Pg59 25%)

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beth16x
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(Original post by The Chard)
1. Love – ‘She was much too fond of Heathcliff. The greatest punishment we could invent for
her was to keep her separate from him: yet she got chided more than any of us on his account.’
(Nelly – Pg29 50%)

- ‘It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he's more myself than I am’
(Catherine – Pg57 90%)

- ‘My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff!’
(Catherine – Pg59 25%)

Ahh thank you!!
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