Should I bother getting kidney scan? Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
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Basically I had a kidney infection in jan, and since it was my 2nd one in my life the doctor said it's very unlikely there will be permanent damage but we'll refer you on for a scan just in case. I've pretty much had post infection fatigue ever since... and my life has been a mess because I don't have much energy so I didn't book the scan (along with forgetting to do a long list of important things). I got an email saying I hadn't booked it and don't know whether I still should.

I already have 3 different hospital things next term anyway (when we have 4 weeks before exams) and just feel overwhelmed with all the medical stuff. I don't know what the doctor meant by very unlikely... but I guess that's why I haven't booked it...what's the point in sacrificing all my energy for the day if chances are there's nothing wrong? Like if I don't have the scan and there is kidney damage, won't it become apparent something is wrong eventually anyway?
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rachaelftw
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#2
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Your body and your health both mental and physical, are very important. I don't want to sound like I'm lecturing you here, but it's always better to be safe, than sorry, right?

I know you say you have a lot of appointments anyway, but you should still make one and go. If something was wrong, you'd find out earlier, and get treated earlier. If you leave it and there's something wrong (hopefully not), what if it happens during exams and messes all that up? What if you've left it that late, that its a lot more complicated to treat and fix? What if it causes more pain whereas if you had it checked out now, it may have been a quick easy fix.

It's always better to just go so you can be relieved afterwards, rather than put it to the bottom of the pile and "worry about it later".

Good luck x
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Jamie
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Basically I had a kidney infection in jan, and since it was my 2nd one in my life the doctor said it's very unlikely there will be permanent damage but we'll refer you on for a scan just in case. I've pretty much had post infection fatigue ever since... and my life has been a mess because I don't have much energy so I didn't book the scan (along with forgetting to do a long list of important things). I got an email saying I hadn't booked it and don't know whether I still should.

I already have 3 different hospital things next term anyway (when we have 4 weeks before exams) and just feel overwhelmed with all the medical stuff. I don't know what the doctor meant by very unlikely... but I guess that's why I haven't booked it...what's the point in sacrificing all my energy for the day if chances are there's nothing wrong? Like if I don't have the scan and there is kidney damage, won't it become apparent something is wrong eventually anyway?
"what's the point in sacrificing all my energy for the day if chances are there's nothing wrong?"

Very true. Using the same logic I would cancel all the other hospital appointments too.
Whats the point in seeing anyone medical if it is unlikely you'll follow the advice.
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 4 years ago
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(Original post by Jamie)
"what's the point in sacrificing all my energy for the day if chances are there's nothing wrong?"

Very true. Using the same logic I would cancel all the other hospital appointments too.
Whats the point in seeing anyone medical if it is unlikely you'll follow the advice.
The first thing has already been diagnosed and I'm hoping for a steriod pulse as that has really helped me when I've got in a bad way before.

And the other things are tests for something a good chance I have because they are quite often secondary to my already diagnosed condition and would explain a lot.

So you see, 1 sure thing appointment + 2 highly probable appointments

But I think I've just been getting down cause I feel cruddy, my sister convinced me that kidneys are not something to take lightly and as the first poster said, better safe then sorry,

Although you are also right, I barely listen to doctors because most of them don't even bother keeping up to date on their specialities let alone other things. Some are really nice and genuinly care for their patients, they are the ones worth listening too - I'm lucky both my GP and consultant are like that.
However, if I wasn't disillusioned enough one of my closest friends medic in first year thus met all her medic friends 3/4 of them are becoming doctors 1. for the money 2. the status or 3 because daddy is a doctor and they know first hand it'll bring them 1 or 2.
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tania<3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
The first thing has already been diagnosed and I'm hoping for a steriod pulse as that has really helped me when I've got in a bad way before.

And the other things are tests for something a good chance I have because they are quite often secondary to my already diagnosed condition and would explain a lot.

So you see, 1 sure thing appointment + 2 highly probable appointments

But I think I've just been getting down cause I feel cruddy, my sister convinced me that kidneys are not something to take lightly and as the first poster said, better safe then sorry,

Although you are also right, I barely listen to doctors because most of them don't even bother keeping up to date on their specialities let alone other things. Some are really nice and genuinly care for their patients, they are the ones worth listening too - I'm lucky both my GP and consultant are like that.
However, if I wasn't disillusioned enough one of my closest friends medic in first year thus met all her medic friends 3/4 of them are becoming doctors 1. for the money 2. the status or 3 because daddy is a doctor and they know first hand it'll bring them 1 or 2.
As a medic I can sympathise. I get quite apathetic about my own health sometimes but you just need to think that this would be better for you in the long run, as some people have already mentioned previously.

Is your tiredness down to your diagnosed condition? Because if you're been this way since January it seems like an awfully long time to be constantly fatigued. I would definitely get the scan booked, it won't hopefully take too long? When are your exams - if they're soon then maybe it's better getting the scan done after them, that way you won't be stressed by the time you have the appointment. It might also be worth just talking to your GP as well, if you feel comfortable with a telephone interview maybe they would be able to do that? Just because from the way you've described your lack of energy, it might be something more than just the post-infection tiredness.

Also I wouldn't worry too much about what your medic friend says about the other people in their year. A lot of people change throughout medical school, heck even I was an idiot in first year and didn't really know why I was doing medicine! But now having been on placement for most of the last year and seeing how rewarding the job can be, I can honestly say I'm not in for prestige or money :P People's priorities change, what they wanted at 18 might not be the same once they graduate at 24. I know the current NHS situation isn't particularly encouraging especially with all the talk in the media about privatization, but at the same time rest assured there are plenty of hardworking doctors who are in the profession simply because of how rewarding it is to be able to help people and save lives (even if that is a cliched phrase )
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Friar Chris
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#6
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Yes.

What type of scan?

Yes.

(Original post by Anonymous)
However, if I wasn't disillusioned enough one of my closest friends medic in first year thus met all her medic friends 3/4 of them are becoming doctors 1. for the money 2. the status or 3 because daddy is a doctor and they know first hand it'll bring them 1 or 2.
Yeah, this ticks me off quite a lot. Amongst my colleagues, a hippocratic sense of duty is disappointingly rare.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by tania<3)
As a medic I can sympathise. I get quite apathetic about my own health sometimes but you just need to think that this would be better for you in the long run, as some people have already mentioned previously.

Is your tiredness down to your diagnosed condition? Because if you're been this way since January it seems like an awfully long time to be constantly fatigued. I would definitely get the scan booked, it won't hopefully take too long? When are your exams - if they're soon then maybe it's better getting the scan done after them, that way you won't be stressed by the time you have the appointment. It might also be worth just talking to your GP as well, if you feel comfortable with a telephone interview maybe they would be able to do that? Just because from the way you've described your lack of energy, it might be something more than just the post-infection tiredness.

Also I wouldn't worry too much about what your medic friend says about the other people in their year. A lot of people change throughout medical school, heck even I was an idiot in first year and didn't really know why I was doing medicine! But now having been on placement for most of the last year and seeing how rewarding the job can be, I can honestly say I'm not in for prestige or money :P People's priorities change, what they wanted at 18 might not be the same once they graduate at 24. I know the current NHS situation isn't particularly encouraging especially with all the talk in the media about privatization, but at the same time rest assured there are plenty of hardworking doctors who are in the profession simply because of how rewarding it is to be able to help people and save lives (even if that is a cliched phrase )

I'm not sure if my tiredness is down to what's already been diagnosed, it does cause fatigue. However, I haven't been right since september... I had a bad virus which apparently caused my liver to become inflamed for several months. I started asking about a steriod pulse in decemeber to give me a boost (saw a annoying registrar, who said I'm too young (despite having them prescribed by the consultant in charge of the clinic before and several other consultants back home before) to get over bad periods... I know they have long term side effects - that's why I'm not suggesting being on them permanently....) . My appointments got messed up and I'm not seeing another rheumy till the weeks before exams.

After the response, I saw the GP, asked when my thyroid had last been checked.... she said it was normal but my vitamin D was practically non existant.

I am a bit sceptical about the thyroid thing. I've only been on blood thinners since 2011... blood tests picked up abnormal coagulation since 2007 but apparently despite doctors using blood tests as the holy grail (in my opinion symptoms should be paid more attention to, because blood is not the full picture) they didn't bother to read mine...

Additionally, I didn't get told the level (the UK apparently uses higher normal ranges then the rest of europe) she only ordered TSH and I can see the 2007 print out of TSH was already on the borderline... unfortunately don't have any blood test results since then. My hair has been falling out, my eyebrows have thinned so much when I saw my threading lady after not being for a few months her reaction was: OMG WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO YOUR EYEBROWS?! ...if I'm left to my own devices I'm sleeping 18 hours a day (generally feel like I have no energy), I'm extremely sensitive to cold/ temp change, I put on 20 pounds in a year .... typical hypothyroidism symptoms, no? Nonetheless, I'll ring up when the GP surgery opens and see if I can find out my TSH levels at the same time



I'm really glad to hear you matured! I'm hoping your right/ maybe some of it was bravado in the group! What exactly about the placement showed you how rewarding it is? Yes, I'm totally against privatisiation but if that worse case scenerio becomes reality... then the one benefit is actually weeding out those ****ty doctors (people will vote with their feet).


Sorry, this has been a bit of rant! Happy Easter!

Oh and if your curious, I have 'SLE-like connective tissue disorder and Hughes syndrome' that was called chronic fatigue syndrome for six years... saying that my symptoms are more typical of CFS (went from doing dance classes every day to not being able to walk to the end of my road) . I think a lot of my kidney scan thing comes down to guilt... I feel like I've had more than my share of NHS resources and I'm already getting tested for POTS when I get back which i'm not that confident that I have. However, it's good to exclude it and if I do YAY hopefully I'll finally be able to walk normal distances again.
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Jamie
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(Original post by Anonymous)
The first thing has already been diagnosed and I'm hoping for a steriod pulse as that has really helped me when I've got in a bad way before.

And the other things are tests for something a good chance I have because they are quite often secondary to my already diagnosed condition and would explain a lot.

So you see, 1 sure thing appointment + 2 highly probable appointments

But I think I've just been getting down cause I feel cruddy, my sister convinced me that kidneys are not something to take lightly and as the first poster said, better safe then sorry,

Although you are also right, I barely listen to doctors because most of them don't even bother keeping up to date on their specialities let alone other things. Some are really nice and genuinly care for their patients, they are the ones worth listening too - I'm lucky both my GP and consultant are like that.
However, if I wasn't disillusioned enough one of my closest friends medic in first year thus met all her medic friends 3/4 of them are becoming doctors 1. for the money 2. the status or 3 because daddy is a doctor and they know first hand it'll bring them 1 or 2.
Firstly there is bugger all money and little prestige. The daddy is a doctor thing - very true. Although it will I'm sure change with this generation. I sure as heck don't want my kids going into medicine.

Your last post to tania exemplifies why I hate the CFS label. Its lazy. Too often it is used by doctors to label a group o symptoms instead of digging deeper and finding the true problem. In your case an SLE like connective tissue disorder and Hughes syndrome.

I worked with Prof Hughes. He had done some research in the Carribean that found something crazy like 10% of 'recurrent migraines' out there were actually APS (Hughes Syndrome)
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Jamie)
Firstly there is bugger all money and little prestige. The daddy is a doctor thing - very true. Although it will I'm sure change with this generation. I sure as heck don't want my kids going into medicine.

Your last post to tania exemplifies why I hate the CFS label. Its lazy. Too often it is used by doctors to label a group o symptoms instead of digging deeper and finding the true problem. In your case an SLE like connective tissue disorder and Hughes syndrome.

I worked with Prof Hughes. He had done some research in the Carribean that found something crazy like 10% of 'recurrent migraines' out there were actually APS (Hughes Syndrome)

Bugger all money compared to say...IB, but compared to the average wage of the country it's a lot. Also better paid then university post-doctorates/ lecturers who are similarly required to have a high level of education. Why do you not want your kids going on?

It's very true... although currently inclined to think there is a disorder/ several disorders which are diagnosed with CFS/M.E which can't be explained by anything else, However, good quality research is very hard to conduct when there are lots of people who probably have different problems but are all lumped into the same category. I read something a while ago about SPECT scans revealing brain stem abnormalities and it being very specific to M.E...I wonder what ever happened to that research. Saying that one of the most specific CFS/M.E things is exercise intolerance...I do have that but I'm hoping it's POTS.

I have the utmost respect for Professor Hughes, I don't know what would be of my uncle now if not for him. He has fully fledged SLE and Hughes syndrome but other doctors were still baffled, even after the stroke. Are you a rheumatologist then?

TSH 4.13 now... still don't know if my GP will listen but shivering at night when the house is 20 degrees despite being wrapped up in multiple layers is not normal!
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Anonymous #1
#10
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(Original post by Jamie)
Firstly there is bugger all money and little prestige. The daddy is a doctor thing - very true. Although it will I'm sure change with this generation. I sure as heck don't want my kids going into medicine.

Your last post to tania exemplifies why I hate the CFS label. Its lazy. Too often it is used by doctors to label a group o symptoms instead of digging deeper and finding the true problem. In your case an SLE like connective tissue disorder and Hughes syndrome.

I worked with Prof Hughes. He had done some research in the Carribean that found something crazy like 10% of 'recurrent migraines' out there were actually APS (Hughes Syndrome)

Also, am not clear if having some thyrogloblin/ thyroid peroxidose antibodies but in range means:

1. Have an autoimmune disease but not specific to thyroid and/ or
2. Have an increased risk of thyroid problems
Or
3. Most of the population will have some of the antibodies but it doesn't mean anything if it's the normal range?
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