Poorpeople
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Need a little help with A methylene blue/yeast/temperature practical writeup (Already done the practical):
It's pretty urgent too, so any help would be appreciated...

Specifically, at higher temperatures, is it the denaturing of Enzymes which means that the yeast cannot respire that kills it, or something else?

At which stage of respiration does Methylene blue accept hydrogen from? if it is all of them then how does Oxidative phosphorylation occur? (If it actually occurs that is). If the methylene blue could be reoxidised then wouldn't it turn blue again? if it isn't reoxidised then how does the yeast produce sufficient ATP without oxidative phosphorylation?

Might add some more to this as I write this up
Once again though I really urgently need help with this so I'd appreciate any help
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Poorpeople
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Poorpeople
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Cmon people I really need help with this
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Poorpeople
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Alright so I did a mock analysis for this kind of this (note this isn't from an actual empa ), what do you people think?

Respiration is the process by which most organisms produce energy in the form of a universal energy currency, ATP; ATP is produced using energy from glucose and other organic molecules in the following reactions-


[Drawings of Glycolysis>link>krebs would be here]

RedNAD/RedFAD then moves to the mitochondrial membrane where it donates an electron to the ETC to energise proton pumps and pump protons into the intermembranal space, creating a chemiosmotic gradient down which protons will flow through ATP Synthase containing stalked particles, the ATP synthase complexes convert the energy from the proton into mechanical energy and back into chemical energy by forming a molecule of ATP from ADP + P(I)

Some yeast below the surface of the solution may be in anaerobic conditions and will respire anaerobically via fermentation to form ethanol

[Drawing of Fermentation would be here]

Methylene blue decolourizes when it is reduced, it is an NAD substitute and thus will be reduced during respiration.
When the temperature of a Yeast/glucose solution increases, the kinetic energy of the particles within increases, increasing their velocity; as velocity increases the number of collisions also increases, when the number of collisions increases the number of successful collisions also increases and so the number of enzyme-substrate complexes formed increases, resulting in an increase in the amount of product produced/unit time; as temperature increases the rate of respiration of yeast will increase.

As rate of respiration increases, the amount of product produced per unit time by dehydrogenase enzymes in yeast will increase, so more NAD/Methylene blue can be reduced in a given time, so up until an optimum temperature the time taken for Methylene blue to turn from blue to colourless will decrease (As amount of methylene blue reduced per unit time increases); after an optimum temperature the time taken for methylene blue to be reduced and turn colourless will increase as respiratory enzymes begin to denature resulting in less dehydrogenation in a given time, this will occur until the yeast eventually dies and the time taken for methylene blue to turn from blue to colourless would be infinity.

(In my hypothetical nonexistant non EMPA prediction) I predicted that the time taken for methylene blue to turn from blue to colourless would decrease as temperature increased up until an optimum temperature, after this temperature any further increase would cause the time taken for methylene blue to decolourise would increase, this was proven to be correct and is supported fully by my (hypothetical) results


If I don't get any replies to this and nobody wants to assess that then count me as a sacrifice to the EMPA gods, if it happens to be of any use to anyone then feel free to use it.
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tab123654
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The methyl blue goes round to the yeast ends of town and the yeast dont play that game, yeast aint about that life, so a gang war happens in the yeasts back garden, which adds a home advantage, due to the methlyn being a minority and yeast being the big dog, they have a fight and the methyl blue loses because its mam came round and made it go home and the yeast pokes its chest and and keeps its colour.
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elise.harrison
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(Original post by Poorpeople)
Alright so I did a mock analysis for this kind of this (note this isn't from an actual empa ), what do you people think?

Respiration is the process by which most organisms produce energy in the form of a universal energy currency, ATP; ATP is produced using energy from glucose and other organic molecules in the following reactions-


[Drawings of Glycolysis>link>krebs would be here]

RedNAD/RedFAD then moves to the mitochondrial membrane where it donates an electron to the ETC to energise proton pumps and pump protons into the intermembranal space, creating a chemiosmotic gradient down which protons will flow through ATP Synthase containing stalked particles, the ATP synthase complexes convert the energy from the proton into mechanical energy and back into chemical energy by forming a molecule of ATP from ADP + P(I)

Some yeast below the surface of the solution may be in anaerobic conditions and will respire anaerobically via fermentation to form ethanol

[Drawing of Fermentation would be here]

Methylene blue decolourizes when it is reduced, it is an NAD substitute and thus will be reduced during respiration.
When the temperature of a Yeast/glucose solution increases, the kinetic energy of the particles within increases, increasing their velocity; as velocity increases the number of collisions also increases, when the number of collisions increases the number of successful collisions also increases and so the number of enzyme-substrate complexes formed increases, resulting in an increase in the amount of product produced/unit time; as temperature increases the rate of respiration of yeast will increase.

As rate of respiration increases, the amount of product produced per unit time by dehydrogenase enzymes in yeast will increase, so more NAD/Methylene blue can be reduced in a given time, so up until an optimum temperature the time taken for Methylene blue to turn from blue to colourless will decrease (As amount of methylene blue reduced per unit time increases); after an optimum temperature the time taken for methylene blue to be reduced and turn colourless will increase as respiratory enzymes begin to denature resulting in less dehydrogenation in a given time, this will occur until the yeast eventually dies and the time taken for methylene blue to turn from blue to colourless would be infinity.

(In my hypothetical nonexistant non EMPA prediction) I predicted that the time taken for methylene blue to turn from blue to colourless would decrease as temperature increased up until an optimum temperature, after this temperature any further increase would cause the time taken for methylene blue to decolourise would increase, this was proven to be correct and is supported fully by my (hypothetical) results


If I don't get any replies to this and nobody wants to assess that then count me as a sacrifice to the EMPA gods, if it happens to be of any use to anyone then feel free to use it.
You have saved my life. Thank you
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mohanna_alk77
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Hi does anyone know anything about precautions needed for potential hazards involving yeast and TTC?
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