Stark95
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I got an offer for Warwick ( PPE) I am enthusiastic about however my parents are trying to convince me to go to Bocconi. Their reasoning is that Bocconi is just as good to get a job in IB and there is an heavier workload which correlates to a better education. I admit they do have point, however I think Warwick offers more opportunity for a job in the city, but they say '' it's better to be in the best university in Italy than in a second - meaning after Oxbridge/LSE - tier one in the UK ''.Could you give me some points supporting that Warwick is better than Bocconi regarding opportunities ? Also they are worried that I may need a master after graduation, if I go to Warwick, to work into IB, is it true?
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DPats
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PPE at Warwick will definitely get you noticed by any IB you want to work for. Its just as good as oxbridge, LSE, Imperial and UCL. Those are the target 6. There are a lot of extra opportunities to help you with getting into IB at Warwick, despite not being located in London. I'm currently a first year student at a uni ranked higher than warwick, oxford or UCL for engineering and want to go into IB. It was a big mistake, i'm actually reapplying to start again in september at UCL or imperial. I thought that the uni rank for my course was more important than how much it is targeted by IB's. I was wrong. The rank of the uni for the subject isn't that important as long as you go to the target uni, even if the course isn't great (not that thats the case in your example because Warwick is one of the best for PPE)
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Stark95
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(Original post by DPats)
PPE at Warwick will definitely get you noticed by any IB you want to work for. Its just as good as oxbridge, LSE, Imperial and UCL. Those are the target 6. There are a lot of extra opportunities to help you with getting into IB at Warwick, despite not being located in London. I'm currently a first year student at a uni ranked higher than warwick, oxford or UCL for engineering and want to go into IB. It was a big mistake, i'm actually reapplying to start again in september at UCL or imperial. I thought that the uni rank for my course was more important than how much it is targeted by IB's. I was wrong. The rank of the uni for the subject isn't that important as long as you go to the target uni, even if the course isn't great (not that thats the case in your example because Warwick is one of the best for PPE)
You made some awesome points
Can you go straight into IB after your undergraduate studies or you need an additional master?
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traumatised
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Man if you want to become an investment banker than Warwick is the place to be. Do not let your parents fool you.
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DPats
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(Original post by Stark95)
You made some awesome points
Can you go straight into IB after your undergraduate studies or you need an additional master?
This depends. In general, you will need to have a masters degree as a minimum. However, I know a few people who were planning on doing a masters, were offered summer internships between their 2nd and 3rd years of study, and were told after completing the summer internship that they could have a job offer after just finishing the standard bachelors degree. So in some cases, if you do an internship and are impressive, the bank may make you a job offer for once you finish a 3 year course and tell you not to bother with your 4th year.
Once you get to uni, you can decide if you'd like to do 3 or 4 years. It doesn't really matter which one you apply for. At any point during your first 2 years, you can tell your director of studies that you want to change your duration of study and they will allow this. (Even if the offers for 3 years are lower than 4 years). If this is the case, my advice would be to apply for the lower entry requirement and switch once you get to uni. It isn't like switching subject where theres a chance the course you want to switch to could be full. They will allow you to switch no matter what your grades are. And if you do better than what the offer is, they will probably 'upgrade' you to the 4 year masters program automatically.

In summary: In general IB's will want a masters unless you do an internship and they make you an offer for a job telling you that they don't mind if you don't bother with your fourth year of study
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MAINE.
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(Original post by DPats)
This depends. In general, you will need to have a masters degree as a minimum. However, I know a few people who were planning on doing a masters, were offered summer internships between their 2nd and 3rd years of study, and were told after completing the summer internship that they could have a job offer after just finishing the standard bachelors degree. So in some cases, if you do an internship and are impressive, the bank may make you a job offer for once you finish a 3 year course and tell you not to bother with your 4th year.
Once you get to uni, you can decide if you'd like to do 3 or 4 years. It doesn't really matter which one you apply for. At any point during your first 2 years, you can tell your director of studies that you want to change your duration of study and they will allow this. (Even if the offers for 3 years are lower than 4 years). If this is the case, my advice would be to apply for the lower entry requirement and switch once you get to uni. It isn't like switching subject where theres a chance the course you want to switch to could be full. They will allow you to switch no matter what your grades are. And if you do better than what the offer is, they will probably 'upgrade' you to the 4 year masters program automatically.

In summary: In general IB's will want a masters unless you do an internship and they make you an offer for a job telling you that they don't mind if you don't bother with your fourth year of study

I stopped reading this at the first sentence. IBs recruit literally thousands of people every year straight out of undergrad.

The custom is to aim for a spring week in your first year of uni, a summer internship in your penultimate year and then to convert that into a grad offer, or failing that, interview for grad roles in your final year of your undergrad.

OP, if you want to work in London, I would take the target uni an hour away on the train rather than the target uni 1,000s of miles away.
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Stark95
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(Original post by MAINE.)
I stopped reading this at the first sentence. IBs recruit literally thousands of people every year straight out of undergrad.

The custom is to aim for a spring week in your first year of uni, a summer internship in your penultimate year and then to convert that into a grad offer, or failing that, interview for grad roles in your final year of your undergrad.

OP, if you want to work in London, I would take the target uni an hour away on the train rather than the target uni 1,000s of miles away.
That's good because I don't think there is a 4 year PPE option

And 30k for a master is kinda hard to pay
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MAINE.
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(Original post by Stark95)
That's good because I don't think there is a 4 year PPE option

And 30k for a master is kinda hard to pay
Just out of curiosity, where are your parents from and where do you live now?
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Noble.
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(Original post by DPats)
This depends. In general, you will need to have a masters degree as a minimum. However, I know a few people who were planning on doing a masters, were offered summer internships between their 2nd and 3rd years of study, and were told after completing the summer internship that they could have a job offer after just finishing the standard bachelors degree. So in some cases, if you do an internship and are impressive, the bank may make you a job offer for once you finish a 3 year course and tell you not to bother with your 4th year.
Once you get to uni, you can decide if you'd like to do 3 or 4 years. It doesn't really matter which one you apply for. At any point during your first 2 years, you can tell your director of studies that you want to change your duration of study and they will allow this. (Even if the offers for 3 years are lower than 4 years). If this is the case, my advice would be to apply for the lower entry requirement and switch once you get to uni. It isn't like switching subject where theres a chance the course you want to switch to could be full. They will allow you to switch no matter what your grades are. And if you do better than what the offer is, they will probably 'upgrade' you to the 4 year masters program automatically.

In summary: In general IB's will want a masters unless you do an internship and they make you an offer for a job telling you that they don't mind if you don't bother with your fourth year of study
In general IBs don't give a hoot whether you have a bachelors or a masters.
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DPats
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(Original post by MAINE.)
I stopped reading this at the first sentence. IBs recruit literally thousands of people every year straight out of undergrad.

The custom is to aim for a spring week in your first year of uni, a summer internship in your penultimate year and then to convert that into a grad offer, or failing that, interview for grad roles in your final year of your undergrad.

OP, if you want to work in London, I would take the target uni an hour away on the train rather than the target uni 1,000s of miles away.
Correct me if i'm wrong but didn't I mention the whole summer internship route and how it could potentially save you a year, making it the best way?

As for not needing a masters, well, I took part in a weeks work experience at Citi and another at J.P. Morgan, both on the trading floors. I would say 9/10 people I spoke to on both said they had masters degrees in whatever subject they did. I mean, I'm no statistician (my maths isn't too bad being an engineer and all) but if 9/10 people have a masters and 1/10 doesn't, wouldn't you have a bit of a better chance of getting the job you want with the masters degree?

Look into exactly what the uni closer to you has to offer in terms of extra lectures by guest speakers, workshops and networking events. If it's on the same level as warwick, then go for that one. I only know about warwick, and can safely say they will provide you with everything you need to be in the best position to apply for spring weeks and internships. One of my friends there (who isn't really a stand out candidate) and isn't doing an economics based degree still managed to get 6 out of the 7 spring weeks he applied for.
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Noble.
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(Original post by DPats)
Correct me if i'm wrong but didn't I mention the whole summer internship route and how it could potentially save you a year, making it the best way?

As for not needing a masters, well, I took part in a weeks work experience at Citi and another at J.P. Morgan, both on the trading floors. I would say 9/10 people I spoke to on both said they had masters degrees in whatever subject they did. I mean, I'm no statistician (my maths isn't too bad being an engineer and all) but if 9/10 people have a masters and 1/10 doesn't, wouldn't you have a bit of a better chance of getting the job you want with the masters degree?

Look into exactly what the uni closer to you has to offer in terms of extra lectures by guest speakers, workshops and networking events. If it's on the same level as warwick, then go for that one. I only know about warwick, and can safely say they will provide you with everything you need to be in the best position to apply for spring weeks and internships. One of my friends there (who isn't really a stand out candidate) and isn't doing an economics based degree still managed to get 6 out of the 7 spring weeks he applied for.
No, it doesn't imply that. Hypothetically, if in fact 99% of people applying had Masters degrees and only 1% a Bachelors then actually you have a better chance without the masters degree going off your estimates. Obviously when you're on a trading floor and you've got a load of people with maths/physics/engineering degrees (some of whom can't even graduate without a masters) you're going to find a lot of people with them, it doesn't indicate at all that banks care about people having them.
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DPats
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(Original post by Noble.)
No, it doesn't imply that. Hypothetically, if in fact 99% of people applying had Masters degrees and only 1% a Bachelors then actually you have a better chance without the masters degree going off your estimates. Obviously when you're on a trading floor and you've got a load of people with maths/physics/engineering degrees (some of whom can't even graduate without a masters) you're going to find a lot of people with them, it doesn't indicate at all that banks care about people having them.
My estimated figures weren't for people applying. I wasn't talking to other students there (sorry if I made it sound like that). What I meant was that when I asked people actually working there, 9/10 had masters degrees. Suggesting that (assuming the same number of people applied with a masters as those without), a far larger proportion of applicants with a masters were successful.

I'm sure you're right about a lot of other banks (or even other roles within the bank) not being so picky about the masters. OP, you didn't say whether you knew what specific part of the bank you'd like to work in. I just assumed s&t, since there seems to be a lot of people on here who are aiming for that, and from my limited experiences, the impression I got was that if you aren't offered a job after an internship, your best bet would be with a masters.

I don't know how much you know about the actual applications to Uni's, Noble, but perhaps you could take a quick look at the last thread I posted (last night). Got a fair amount of views but no replies, maybe you could help me out?
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Princepieman
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(Original post by DPats)
My estimated figures weren't for people applying. I wasn't talking to other students there (sorry if I made it sound like that). What I meant was that when I asked people actually working there, 9/10 had masters degrees. Suggesting that (assuming the same number of people applied with a masters as those without), a far larger proportion of applicants with a masters were successful.

I'm sure you're right about a lot of other banks (or even other roles within the bank) not being so picky about the masters. OP, you didn't say whether you knew what specific part of the bank you'd like to work in. I just assumed s&t, since there seems to be a lot of people on here who are aiming for that, and from my limited experiences, the impression I got was that if you aren't offered a job after an internship, your best bet would be with a masters.

I don't know how much you know about the actual applications to Uni's, Noble, but perhaps you could take a quick look at the last thread I posted (last night). Got a fair amount of views but no replies, maybe you could help me out?
There are two ways this can be explained:

A) The banks hire a lot of EU grads (like A LOT) and it is common place for these guys to have continued on to Master's level. Here, in the UK, people aren't as likely to continue on to a Master's.

B) They've gotten sponsored by the organization to undertake a masters.

In any case, no, you don't need a master's degree it just so happens that a lot of the EU grads have one because of the nature of their education systems.

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