Can politics be taught? Watch

SBKA
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I do not mean 'Politics' in the sense of the actual subject that is usually studied later on. (I study it myself!)

Can children and teenagers be taught to be interested in the political process?

I do not believe they can.
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benq
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(Original post by SBKA)
I do not mean 'Politics' in the sense of the actual subject that is usually studied later on. (I study it myself!)

Can children and teenagers be taught to be interested in the political process?

I do not believe they can.
Of course they can. Especially if it is actually interesting. But different people find different things interesting, so you certainly can't "teach" everybody.
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aoxa
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Yes. And it should be a compulsory subject, at least throughout secondary school.
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SBKA
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(Original post by benq)
Of course they can. Especially if it is actually interesting. But different people find different things interesting, so you certainly can't "teach" everybody.
Are young people inclined to find politics interesting though? I would argue on the whole that they are not.
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a320airbus97
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(Original post by aoxa)
Yes. And it should be a compulsory subject, at least throughout secondary school.
I agree fully: if people understood the British political system and what different parties stood for, we would certainly see a huge decrease in support for the Greens etc. I think that a politically active Britain would be more right wing than it is today, and we would have a smaller, more efficient government with a stronger economy.
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SBKA
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(Original post by aoxa)
Yes. And it should be a compulsory subject, at least throughout secondary school.
I would agree with you that the political process should be compulsory, but what I am talking about in this thread is an actual engagement in politics.
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SBKA
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(Original post by a320airbus97)
I agree fully: if people understood the British political system and what different parties stood for, we would certainly see a huge decrease in support for the Greens etc. I think that a politically active Britain would be more right wing than it is today, and we would have a smaller, more efficient government with a stronger economy.
Aren't young people generally more likely to support socialist ideals though? Could this be educated out of them?
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a320airbus97
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(Original post by SBKA)
Aren't young people generally more likely to support socialist ideals though? Could this be educated out of them?
Youth in general think that the world is a happy place where everyone is equal and that there is a never-ending supply of money. If politics was taught, this belief would certainly cease to exist: I just hope that eventually the government realises that Britain needs to be politically educated.
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SBKA
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(Original post by a320airbus97)
Youth in general think that the world is a happy place where everyone is equal and that there is a never-ending supply of money. If politics was taught, this belief would certainly cease to exist: I just hope that eventually the government realises that Britain needs to be politically educated.
I don't agree that this can be taught. Until the youth of this world actually grows up and experiences the lessons of the world I do not believe that we can really understand the numerous faults in Green party thinking.
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scrotgrot
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(Original post by SBKA)
Aren't young people generally more likely to support socialist ideals though? Could this be educated out of them?
Well that didn't take long, did it?

Why are right-wingers so scared of people holding the "wrong" opinions?
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SBKA
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(Original post by scrotgrot)
Well that didn't take long, did it?

Why are right-wingers so scared of people holding the "wrong" opinions?
I was responding to a previous comment made by someone else. As a libertarian I strongly oppose the 're-educating' of anyone. I do not think the problem you were alluding to is specifically right wing in nature. It is a problem that plagues all areas of the political sphere.
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a320airbus97
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(Original post by SBKA)
I don't agree that this can be taught. Until the youth of this world actually grows up and experiences the lessons of the world I do not believe that we can really understand the numerous faults in Green party thinking.
I know that this cannot be taught, but if students were presented with the facts, they would be able to come to their own conclusion that Green thinking has many faults.
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mojojojo101
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Very, very few people want to teach politics, what they want to teach is THEIR politics.

British politics is already incredibly narrow in its thought, there are very few fresh ideas, very few revolutionary ideas.

If you want (young) people to care about politics then stop telling them how much it matters and make it ACTUALLY matter.
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StretfordEnd
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(Original post by SBKA)
Aren't young people generally more likely to support socialist ideals though? Could this be educated out of them?
In the space of a few comments you've gone from 'let's teach people about politics' to political indoctrination, and that's the dangerous thing. When it comes to teaching politics to kids, who arbitrates? Who is impartial enough to make decisions on whether the teaching is biased?

The difference with adults at University (or even A level students) is that they should have the necessary cognitive skills to be able to:

A)Understand if there's a subersive bias
B)Not to blindly accept everything they're taught as truth.

In terms of actually getting young people as a whole interested in politics, why do you think education would achieve this? Physical Geography and Science are crucial parts of the curriculum, but the fact I had to study them didn't make me interested in those subjects in the slightest.

The big issues with disinterest are that 'politics' is filled with boring old men, and that a lot of people don't realise how important politics is (if that's not too condescending).

I'm sure many might disagree, but I would argue that pretty much any conceivable complaint you might have in life has politics at its root. If that is believed by people who are disengaged from politics, maybe things will change.
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SBKA
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(Original post by StretfordEnd)
In the space of a few comments you've gone from 'let's teach people about politics' to political indoctrination, and that's the dangerous thing. When it comes to teaching politics to kids, who arbitrates? Who is impartial enough to make decisions on whether the teaching is biased?

The difference with adults at University (or even A level students) is that they should have the necessary cognitive skills to be able to:

A)Understand if there's a subersive bias
B)Not to blindly accept everything they're taught as truth.

In terms of actually getting young people as a whole interested in politics, why do you think education would achieve this? Physical Geography and Science are crucial parts of the curriculum, but the fact I had to study them didn't make me interested in those subjects in the slightest.

The big issues with disinterest are that 'politics' is filled with boring old men, and that a lot of people don't realise how important politics is (if that's not too condescending).

I'm sure many might disagree, but I would argue that pretty much any conceivable complaint you might have in life has politics at its root. If that is believed by people who are disengaged from politics, maybe things will change.
I simply posed the questioned. I did not assert either way. That is why I used the question mark.
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democracyforum
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(Original post by SBKA)
I do not mean 'Politics' in the sense of the actual subject that is usually studied later on. (I study it myself!)

Can children and teenagers be taught to be interested in the political process?

I do not believe they can.
No !

You cannot learn it in school either

There is actually nothing to teach. It is actually just history
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