Ancient words that should be revived Watch

Compost
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#21
Report 4 years ago
#21
(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
I don't believe it!!:eek:
I'd like to see your bookshelves, we appear to have thoughts in common.

Niggardly. Such a mean sounding word.
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#22
Report 4 years ago
#22
(Original post by Compost)
I'd like to see your bookshelves, we appear to have thoughts in common.

Niggardly. Such a mean sounding word.
Yes, quite possibly.

Agreed. And so easily misunderstood.

Oh, and beslubber.
0
reply
Good bloke
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#23
Report 4 years ago
#23
(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
Clearly a witty and eloquent young chap.
You called?

A poetical young wit, name of Chaucer,
Was challenged to find words that were coarser
Than ‘swyve’, ‘ knob’ or ‘quim’
But his outlook, so prim,
Meant his impudence stopped short at ‘saucer’!

Well, its the best I can do this afternoon.


(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
Curmudgeon. (Actually, I use that quite a lot.)
I'm a bit concerned to see that a good third of the words mentioned have been used by me this year, and those below seem to me to be commonly used:


(Original post by The_Last_Melon)
thus
hither
thence
wherefore
0
reply
Asolare
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#24
Report 4 years ago
#24
Ragamuffin

Plethora is a good word too, I know it's still used a bit but very scarcely.
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#25
Report 4 years ago
#25
(Original post by Good bloke)
You called?

A poetical young wit, name of Chaucer,
Was challenged to find words that were coarser
Than ‘swyve’, ‘ knob’ or ‘quim’
But his outlook, so prim,
Meant his impudence stopped short at ‘saucer’!

Well, its the best I can do this afternoon.




I'm a bit concerned to see that a good third of the words mentioned have been used by me this year, and those below seem to me to be commonly used:
Alas, yes, my own vocabulary seems to feature here a good deal as well.

Donne is fonne, but Chaucer is caucer....
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#26
Report 4 years ago
#26
Cuckold is a genuinely useful word without much by way of modern equivalent.
0
reply
the bear
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#27
Report 4 years ago
#27
(Original post by Good bloke)
You called?

A poetical young wit, name of Chaucer,
Was challenged to find words that were coarser
Than ‘swyve’, ‘ knob’ or ‘quim’
But his outlook, so prim,
Meant his impudence stopped short at ‘saucer’!
:congrats:

Well played Sire !!

:rofl:
0
reply
Good bloke
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#28
Report 4 years ago
#28
(Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
Cuckold is a genuinely useful word without much by way of modern equivalent.
As are spinster and goodwife.
0
reply
Good bloke
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#29
Report 4 years ago
#29
(Original post by the bear)
:congrats:

Well played Sire !!

:rofl:
Too kind. Too kind.
0
reply
Baron of Sealand
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#30
Report 4 years ago
#30
swag
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#31
Report 4 years ago
#31
(Original post by Good bloke)
As are spinster and goodwife.
Sure. We could do with a female cuckold these days. If there is one, I don't know it.
0
reply
Drunk Punx
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#32
Report 4 years ago
#32
Callipygian.
0
reply
the bear
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#33
Report 4 years ago
#33
agenbite of inwit
0
reply
Magnus Taylor
Badges: 15
#34
Report 4 years ago
#34
Hitherto
0
reply
the bear
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#35
Report 4 years ago
#35
umbo
0
reply
The_Last_Melon
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#36
Report 4 years ago
#36
(Original post by Good bloke)
You called?

A poetical young wit, name of Chaucer,
Was challenged to find words that were coarser
Than ‘swyve’, ‘ knob’ or ‘quim’
But his outlook, so prim,
Meant his impudence stopped short at ‘saucer’!

Well, its the best I can do this afternoon.




I'm a bit concerned to see that a good third of the words mentioned have been used by me this year, and those below seem to me to be commonly used:
do you talk to living humans
0
reply
Good bloke
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#37
Report 4 years ago
#37
(Original post by The_Last_Melon)
do you talk to living humans
There once was a fellow, a hick,
Who was asked if he spoke with the quick;
He replied, in a slur,
“Should happenstance occur
It gives pain to my neck with a crick.”
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#38
Report 4 years ago
#38
(Original post by Dylann)
I don't know how old it is, but defenestration is a good word that you rarely hear. Probably because it means to throw somebody out of a window.

A female maths teacher defenestrated (ground floor fortunately) a boy at my secondary school in the late 1970s
0
reply
Carnationlilyrose
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#39
Report 4 years ago
#39
(Original post by nulli tertius)
A female maths teacher defenestrated (ground floor fortunately) a boy at my secondary school in the late 1970s
Happier times....:moon:
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#40
Report 4 years ago
#40
You read a lot about people who lack ruth but very little about people who possess ruth.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What offers have you received from universities?

Unconditional (53)
21.03%
Unconditional if firmed (20)
7.94%
Unconditional if insurance (2)
0.79%
Both unconditional and unconditional if firm/insurance (6)
2.38%
No unconditional offers (171)
67.86%

Watched Threads

View All