kimberry50
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..who are wistfully dreaming of a prestigious place at a Russell Group University or equally distinguished institution:
what are you doing now to build yourself as a potential candidate for a vicious selection process?
is anyone even thinking about it at this age?
and do you feel that being at a state school puts you at a disadvantage?
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Hunnybeebee
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I go to a state school and the aim is mostly to get a 'C' grade and that's that )) if you want anything above that, forget it, because the people that constantly disrupt the class won't let you.

Now I am in sixth form, I am doing everything in bagging work experience and I am very proud of the work experience I have got so far, but my gcse grades? I am ashamed of them despite passing the necessary exams (i.e the 13+) to go into a grammar school but there were no available spaces.

Not all state schools are bad, some of them are really good! I think just with my school it is hard to obtain a very good grade because of the behaviour of your peers. The teachers on the other hand, are amazing, but it is impossible to teach a class of people where a majority are unmotivated, don't care and can't see the potential they have to obtain those grades.. and therefore get distracted :-P
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MFaisal
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Hey

My high school was a state school and now I got to a private sixth form. The jump sounds a little strange but I only got in because I managed to get a bursary to pay for my fees. I needed to get an average of an A across the board at GCSE to get in but I just missed it but they still let me in because I performed well on the assessment day they had for all new boys and the following interview.

Let me tell that the teaching is better (but not waaaaay better) but the opportunities are vast at a private school because they always have contacts who have made it big and come from a rich background.

To answer your question, I did loads of volunteering, got a job, joined societies (in my sixth form) and gave talks regularly. However, this was only achievable due to the abundant opportunities my sixth form gave!

And it is true - not all state schools are bad, but mine was just terrible - had an average 40% pass rate A*-C. :/
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Muntasir24
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I think that state school does not really put you at an disadvantage. At the end of the day, if you want to achieve good grades, you would put the work in. I managed to get to a good university by going to a state school achieving only 2 A's, 2 B's and 4 C's at GCSE's. I just worked hard in sixth form.
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User1674917
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I went to one of the most deprived area schools partly because it was my local one. Pass rate is 48%
The teachers were not good. Unfortunately I was streamed into lower sets when I was capabale of much more.
I ended up getting 5A 3B 2C i got a c in maths when I knw that I could have at least got a B but because of my school that's what happened.
i now can't get into any russel group because they don't ask for a c they want atleast a b
so thats great :/
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German123
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(Original post by KeilahDeere)
I go to a state school and the aim is mostly to get a 'C' grade and that's that )) if you want anything above that, forget it, because the people that constantly disrupt the class won't let you.

Now I am in sixth form, I am doing everything in bagging work experience and I am very proud of the work experience I have got so far, but my gcse grades? I am ashamed of them despite passing the necessary exams (i.e the 13+) to go into a grammar school but there were no available spaces.

Not all state schools are bad, some of them are really good! I think just with my school it is hard to obtain a very good grade because of the behaviour of your peers. The teachers on the other hand, are amazing, but it is impossible to teach a class of people where a majority are unmotivated, don't care and can't see the potential they have to obtain those grades.. and therefore get distracted :-P
The bit in bold is somewhat true.
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Hunnybeebee
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(Original post by German123)
The bit in bold is somewhat true.
It is frustrating and a shame
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STUDYREVISE
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LawStudent30
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I went to a state school and have just graduated from a Russell Group Uni in the summer (so my applications were a few years ago now).

My GCSES were mainly Bs but I worked really hard and got AAAD in Alevels. It sounds like you're very motivated so just work hard and you will get there! Extra-curricular activities always help beef up an application, alongside roles with responsibilities. However, I think you need to get the right balance of extra activities and having time to study!
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Airmed
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I go to a grammar school in N.I, and I'm doing my A Levels. I go to my brother's secondary school to do one of my A Levels, and last year at AS I got an A with the same teaching as the rest of the class. I was the only A in the class, and had to sit through the disruptions of the class.

It's down to the student itself, in my experience.
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TwoLimes
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I went to a state school in a deprived area and we were never encouraged just to go for C's; you were encouraged to push and push, and I came out with A*'s and A's at GCSE's, and I'm off to a Russell Group in September - but they are not necessarily the be all and end all, so don't worry. It's my favourite story to tell but a friend of mine graduated from Manchester Met and now is doing a fully funded postgrad at Cambridge, so y'know. Don't sweat it.


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MFaisal
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(Original post by STUDYREVISE)
Yep, definitely!
aiming all As and A*s and want to go to UOM to study optometry hopefully.

Whoo! Nice, got an offer there for BioMedical Sciences. Need any tips, feel free to pm, mate.
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vanderwoodsen
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I go to one of the best state schools in the country, where it's basically presumed that everyone in the top few sets are to go on to Russell Group universities. I presumed that was what I also wanted, until I took a step back and thought, actually, is that what I want? It'd be nice, and it's not like I don't have the (predicted) grades not to. But it's kind of been pushed onto me.
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morgan8002
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I went to three state secondary schools. The first two were terrible and did pretty much nothing in terms of teaching, but the third was ok.
In general it's possible to self-study five years worth of content if you're good at the subjects.
However, at that age I had no idea how to self-study and I didn't fully figure out how to teach myself to teach myself until towards the end of year 11 while I was self-studying AS maths. Hence, there are some subjects I am very good at(hope to get or have achieved A* at A-level in) that I got As in at GCSE.
There were also a lot of subjects that I wasn't so good at. There was extremely little support for these subjects and as I wasn't good at them, I couldn't self-study them effectively and didn't have a clue what I was supposed to be doing. Either I couldn't take these at GCSE or I got average or bad grades for the ones I took. Some of these I wasn't too unhappy with, but one subject I still haven't passed that I need for university.
Also, state schools tend to enter students for GCSE equivalent qualifications such as DIDA which aren't as respected as GCSEs, but are much harder to do (particularly with no help) and have a maximum grade cap (eg. B).
In the end I got A*AAABBBBBD at GCSE. I also got an A in AS maths, self-studied.

I am now in year 13 and go to a state college and it is much better. The teaching is mostly amazing (all of my A-level teachers have been great) and my grades are usually better than at GCSE. Last year I got A* in A-level maths taken early and AAAB in AS further maths, biology, physics, chemistry. I got another D at IGCSE though. I'm hoping for A*A*A*A*A overall at A-level and good STEP grades.

I didn't get any help with work experience from school, but did manage to get some from someone I know.

I'm hoping to go to Bath or Warwick, but the main condition in the offer and the one I'll struggle with is the aforementioned GCSE subject that I'm terrible at.

We were never even told about grammar schools and I only found out about them last year. Even if we did know about them, we would never have had any preparation for the entrance exams.

Most Russel Group and similar universities do not have a vicious selection process. If you have a good personal statement and perhaps more importantly good AS grades, they will likely make an offer.

Yes, it is a disadvantage, but in your good subjects you can make this up at A-level. In your bad subjects you might just have to hope for the best.
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TeeEm
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(Original post by kimberry50)
..who are wistfully dreaming of a prestigious place at a Russell Group University or equally distinguished institution:
what are you doing now to build yourself as a potential candidate for a vicious selection process?
is anyone even thinking about it at this age?
and do you feel that being at a state school puts you at a disadvantage?
I hope this is not a rhetorical question ...

the answer is plain and simple

definitely yes
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onderk
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I go to a state school, I think the school is good because it gets around 85% A*-C pass rates.

Is this good (in comparison to other state schools)?
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qwerty123asdfg
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I think a good student in a good state school will do just as well and be better set up for life than someone who has had it paid for. Those from state schools have not had there grades their grades spoon fed to them and the unis understand that. I think a private school is most beneficial to someone who wouldn't do quite as well and needs that little bit extra to get what they need out of themselves... Motivation can take you a long way no matter what school you go to though. Private schools and well established state schools just have a better environment to encourage this!
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jackmolineux
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I am thinking of it too, but whether or not its achievable or even outrages for me to be thinking of such a thing is another answer...

I go to a really good state school, thats located in a fairly deprived area but also has a large area that the pupils come from because its a welsh medium school in a mainly english medium area...
But along with the bad areas there are quite well off areas in comparison where most of the top classes come from.

I don't think that it necessarily puts us at a disadvantage but I do think it puts us at a disadvantage in those social circles.

My fathers family is almost solely privately educated and I am the the first I guess for a few generations to go to a state school
Please don't get the wrong impression of me .. I'm not stuck up at all!

Anyway, my dad mucked about in school but still went to uni.
Where as my aunt actually worked and got straight into Oxford.

Plus, don't put yourself down, believe in your abilities! Why do you think its wrong for you to be thinking of russell group unis?



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Emily.97
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I'm not knowledgable with regards to the quality of a private school, so in no way am I going to attempt to compare it with my experiences.

I went to a state school and am currently at one for my A levels. For most of the time, I do feel that teachers weren't/aren't particularly passionate and encouraging, and most, if not all, of my academic success has been from MY work, and my abilities/efforts. If anything, it's helped me to build on my own independence and it ensures that I dont rely on others to manipulate my success.
I have an English teacher for A2 whose passion is inspiring, and I'd say he's the only teacher I've had whose been able to properly motivate me.

I must be doing something right, because I've got offers from all 5 of my university choices and I've firmed a Russell group one. So no, I don't think I've been at a disadvantage. I'm a firm believer in that, as long as you have the correct materials and motivation levels at school, you can be in control of your success. That coupled with skill and knowledge, of course.
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kimberry50
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(Original post by jackmolineux)
I am thinking of it too, but whether or not its achievable or even outrages for me to be thinking of such a thing is another answer...

I go to a really good state school, thats located in a fairly deprived area but also has a large area that the pupils come from because its a welsh medium school in a mainly english medium area...
But along with the bad areas there are quite well off areas in comparison where most of the top classes come from.

I don't think that it necessarily puts us at a disadvantage but I do think it puts us at a disadvantage in those social circles.

My fathers family is almost solely privately educated and I am the the first I guess for a few generations to go to a state school
Please don't get the wrong impression of me .. I'm not stuck up at all!

Anyway, my dad mucked about in school but still went to uni.
Where as my aunt actually worked and got straight into Oxford.

Plus, don't put yourself down, believe in your abilities! Why do you think its wrong for you to be thinking of russell group unis?



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It concerns me that fee paying students receive better and many more opportunities to explore themselves and the wider community whereas state students do not. It pains me to see that equally hard working students like ourselves simply do not have access to the "social circles", opportunities and (some would argue otherwise) better uni interview prep.

Fortunately I'm currently predicted grades similar to grammar and public school students so there are not many concerns in that respect however I just feel that going to such a prestigious uni is more of a dream then reality :/

Also I really love how everyone knows it's not so much about the school than the hard work that we as an individual put in to studying to get the result we deserve.. really inspiring <3
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