rachaelftw
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Hello everyone!

Current 2nd year Mental Health Student Nurse at UCLan.

This is literally, hey there ASK ME ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING, and i'll try give a good enough answer, if not I can probably find someone who will know

Now I can't vouch for other universities and campuses regarding content, holiday dates, placement types etc. but I can't see there being much difference (besides term dates) as we all need to be educated and experienced to the same kind of level, don't we?

So if anyone has any questions or queries, or anything, feel free to ask away and I'll try my hardest to answer to the best of my ability!

If you've arrived here and you're not going into the MH field, here's a link to the master thread where you can find adult, child, learning disabilities student nurses and I think we've even got a student midwife on there who are also happy to answer any questions you may have!
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claireestelle
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(Original post by rachaelftw)
Hello everyone!

Current 2nd year Mental Health Student Nurse at UCLan.

So I know there's a master thread with all the "Student Nurse AMA!" threads in, but I couldn't see one for Mental Health, so I thought I'd start one!

Now I can't vouch for other universities and campuses regarding content, holiday dates, placement types etc. but I can't see there being much difference (besides term dates) as we all need to be educated and experienced to the same kind of level, don't we?

So if anyone has any questions or queries, or anything, feel free to ask away and I'll try my hardest to answer to the best of my ability!
Spoken to you on the uclan thread before but have now thought of a couple of things

Wondering roughly how many assignments and exams you ve had so far? Are there any good books you d recommend getting? Do you have any tips for placement?
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German123
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(Original post by rachaelftw)
Hello everyone!

Current 2nd year Mental Health Student Nurse at UCLan.

So I know there's a master thread with all the "Student Nurse AMA!" threads in, but I couldn't see one for Mental Health, so I thought I'd start one!

Now I can't vouch for other universities and campuses regarding content, holiday dates, placement types etc. but I can't see there being much difference (besides term dates) as we all need to be educated and experienced to the same kind of level, don't we?

So if anyone has any questions or queries, or anything, feel free to ask away and I'll try my hardest to answer to the best of my ability!
Out of interest, what A levels did you take?
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rachaelftw
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Wondering roughly how many assignments and exams you ve had so far? Are there any good books you d recommend getting? Do you have any tips for placement?
Hi Claire, in your first year you have 6 modules throughout the year and you have to do an assignment/exam or some other graded piece for each of them in order to pass. Not sure if they've kept everything the same for future years but we had;
An annotated bibliography
A practical Nursing OSCE
Essay x 2
Exams x 2


For first year I bought the Palgrave & Macmillan Exam Skills handbook but that's because I wanted to be prepared for the assignments and exams. I also bought one of the lecturers own books he wrote, but can't quite remember the name. I think it was Clinical Skills for Student Nurses, but I'll have to check that. When you start, each module normally has a reading list on their e-page site so you can look up any books you fancy and might wanna read. They're not mandatory, just recommended, plus you'll have the library so you won't have to buy them, you can just loan them out
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rachaelftw
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(Original post by German123)
Out of interest, what A levels did you take?
My A-Levels are a different story altogether, haha.

I took;
Biology
Chemistry
Psychology
Photography
General Studies

For my second year, we had to drop a subject, so I dropped Chemistry. Halfway through my second year I had a breakdown & dropped out.

I eventually returned to college but they recommended taking something different so I ended up doing;
Photography
Psychology
Medical Science BTEC (2 years in 1 year)

I had no previous or relevant experience in healthcare but they gave me a chance anyway and it's the best thing I've ever done, I love it.
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German123
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(Original post by rachaelftw)
My A-Levels are a different story altogether, haha.

I took;
Biology
Chemistry
Psychology
Photography
General Studies

For my second year, we had to drop a subject, so I dropped Chemistry. Halfway through my second year I had a breakdown & dropped out.

I eventually returned to college but they recommended taking something different so I ended up doing;
Photography
Psychology
Medical Science BTEC (2 years in 1 year)

I had no previous or relevant experience in healthcare buthey gave me a chance anyway and it's the best thing I've ever done, I love it.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by rachaelftw)
Hi Claire, in your first year you have 6 modules throughout the year and you have to do an assignment/exam or some other graded piece for each of them in order to pass. Not sure if they've kept everything the same for future years but we had;
An annotated bibliography
A practical Nursing OSCE
Essay x 2
Exams x 2


For first year I bought the Palgrave & Macmillan Exam Skills handbook but that's because I wanted to be prepared for the assignments and exams. I also bought one of the lecturers own books he wrote, but can't quite remember the name. I think it was Clinical Skills for Student Nurses, but I'll have to check that. When you start, each module normally has a reading list on their e-page site so you can look up any books you fancy and might wanna read. They're not mandatory, just recommended, plus you'll have the library so you won't have to buy them, you can just loan them out
Thank you I ve done 6 essays a year as part of my foundation degree so was expecting more than that, pleasantly surprised although not keen on exams.

I ve actually done my foundation degree at Uclan and have had a peek at the nursing section in the library so will have a look for the clinical skills book and maybe think about buying it

Would you say that your were in the whole 5 days a week in the first semester or?
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rachaelftw
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Thank you I ve done 6 essays a year as part of my foundation degree so was expecting more than that, pleasantly surprised although not keen on exams.

I ve actually done my foundation degree at Uclan and have had a peek at the nursing section in the library so will have a look for the clinical skills book and maybe think about buying it

Would you say that your were in the whole 5 days a week in the first semester or?
Hi Claire, sorry about the delayed reply!

The 6 essays a year will have been good practice for you, these ones should be a breeze then! And there's lots of extra help and support within the university for if you're struggling so you'll get there

Yeah you should check out the clinical skills book, it's really helped me as I had no previous healthcare experience and was slightly nervous about getting put onto a placement and wondering what on earth I was meant to do! For the first semester, I don't recall being in 5 days a week. I am pretty sure it was only 4 days, and we had Fridays off. Don't quote me, though. However, they may have changed it since then, or may be different for the more recent intakes and the intakes to come, but shouldn't be too different. (Hopefully!!) xx
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claireestelle
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Thank you Glad to hear its not five full days
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claireestelle
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Sorry for another question but what exactly does an osce involve?
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Safiyamae
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(Original post by rachaelftw)
Hello everyone!

Current 2nd year Mental Health Student Nurse at UCLan.

So I know there's a master thread with all the "Student Nurse AMA!" threads in, but I couldn't see one for Mental Health, so I thought I'd start one!

Now I can't vouch for other universities and campuses regarding content, holiday dates, placement types etc. but I can't see there being much difference (besides term dates) as we all need to be educated and experienced to the same kind of level, don't we?

So if anyone has any questions or queries, or anything, feel free to ask away and I'll try my hardest to answer to the best of my ability!
Has UCLan been a good experience so far? And just wondering did you live In halls for 1st year? If so, any tips?
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rachaelftw
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Sorry for another question but what exactly does an osce involve?
Hi Claire, an OSCE is an Objective Structured Clinical Exam.

It's usually a role-play kind of exam where you go in see a patient, get some vitals given and you assess what level of care you would give to the patient. You call out any errors you see or say waht you could do to impove their vitals. You also practice handwashing and get marked on both. You get marked on patient interaction, technique and knowledge. They change the scenario every year so you never know what you're going to get !

You have to pass both the patient part and the handwashing to pass overall. But you practice it lots in the Clinical Skills labs, so don't worry. And they do practice days where you can practice your skills and they'll help you with whatever you need to improve on.
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rachaelftw
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(Original post by Safiyamae)
Has UCLan been a good experience so far? And just wondering did you live In halls for 1st year? If so, any tips?

Hi there!
In my opinion, yes UCLan has been a really good experience for me. Starting off I was very nervous as it ws my first university course, I was straight there from college, and had absolutely 0 healthcare experience whatsoever. But they ease you right back into the learning situation as you're all at different levels (some mature students not being in education for over 20 odd years etc). So that was good. They did a start off module as well to get you used to their learning style and a small assessment to show you how they work, how to use their referencing style, and how they mark/score your work. Everyone was lovely, lecturers, staff, fellow students. Everyone's in the same boat so it was easy to make friends. Our field of MH students are literally just one big family now. Everyone knows everyone, and we all get along. The facilities are excellent, the way they change the learning style to vary it so not just lectures, you have seminars, small group work and workshops/drop-in sessions etcs. So on that note, UCLan has been an amazing experience for me. And I'm halfway to getting a degree in something I love. What could be better ?

Halls. Yes, I lived in halls for both years, and I think I still will next year to be honest. I was a bit late at applying, so didn't get UCLan owned accommodation, I applied to private halls. I went in Moor Lance (just opposite the part of campus where my lectures were, so I could roll out of bed in the mornings ) Didn't have such a good time first year as my flat mates weren't the best of people, but don't let that put you off. We just generally didn't get on. This year though it's great. I upgraded to the newer site Moor Lane has, which is just down the road called Walker Street and it's more modern and fancy and lovely. But they've just done Moor Lane up so that should be at the same condition as mine now. And they've just opened a gym, free to all residents :hubba:

Tips. Now there's a good question, haha. First off when you move on, make ground rules. Sort out fridge space (shelf each, or whatever) and freezer space (shelf each or whatever you've got to work with). If you're okay with sharing, let them know. Just say "if you wanna use my stuff, you can, but clean it and put it away after you're done so I can use it too!" I'd say label everything you don't want people to use. Then they can't use the excuse of "oh I didn't know whose it was, I thought it was for everyone!":facepalm: Trust me, people do haha. Learn how to use the washing machines ASAP, then you don't look like an idiot trying to figure them out, and then you may be able to help other people out, and make friends that way other than that there's not much else. Learn to cook before you go. That's another good way to make friends too
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claireestelle
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(Original post by rachaelftw)
Hi Claire, an OSCE is an Objective Structured Clinical Exam.

It's usually a role-play kind of exam where you go in see a patient, get some vitals given and you assess what level of care you would give to the patient. You call out any errors you see or say waht you could do to impove their vitals. You also practice handwashing and get marked on both. You get marked on patient interaction, technique and knowledge. They change the scenario every year so you never know what you're going to get !

You have to pass both the patient part and the handwashing to pass overall. But you practice it lots in the Clinical Skills labs, so don't worry. And they do practice days where you can practice your skills and they'll help you with whatever you need to improve on.
Thank you I ve done hand-washing before so thats sounds okay, the other part sounds a little scary. Think I ll get into the skills labs as much as possible then
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rachaelftw
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Thank you I ve done hand-washing before so thats sounds okay, the other part sounds a little scary. Think I ll get into the skills labs as much as possible then
That's good then! They do go through everything with you on it, and you get lots of chances to go back and practice etc. but it's good to have a bit of prior knowledge

And yeah, as well as your actual lessons/sessions in there they do drop-in sessions where you can go in and catch-up on things you've missed or just re-cap on something you did another time, so it's all very helpful.

Plus you get to wear your uniform:nurse:
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claireestelle
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Cant wait to wear my uniform for the first time, get a little jealous whenever I see student nurses wearing it round campus
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Safiyamae
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(Original post by rachaelftw)
Hi there!
In my opinion, yes UCLan has been a really good experience for me. Starting off I was very nervous as it ws my first university course, I was straight there from college, and had absolutely 0 healthcare experience whatsoever. But they ease you right back into the learning situation as you're all at different levels (some mature students not being in education for over 20 odd years etc). So that was good. They did a start off module as well to get you used to their learning style and a small assessment to show you how they work, how to use their referencing style, and how they mark/score your work. Everyone was lovely, lecturers, staff, fellow students. Everyone's in the same boat so it was easy to make friends. Our field of MH students are literally just one big family now. Everyone knows everyone, and we all get along. The facilities are excellent, the way they change the learning style to vary it so not just lectures, you have seminars, small group work and workshops/drop-in sessions etcs. So on that note, UCLan has been an amazing experience for me. And I'm halfway to getting a degree in something I love. What could be better ?

Halls. Yes, I lived in halls for both years, and I think I still will next year to be honest. I was a bit late at applying, so didn't get UCLan owned accommodation, I applied to private halls. I went in Moor Lance (just opposite the part of campus where my lectures were, so I could roll out of bed in the mornings ) Didn't have such a good time first year as my flat mates weren't the best of people, but don't let that put you off. We just generally didn't get on. This year though it's great. I upgraded to the newer site Moor Lane has, which is just down the road called Walker Street and it's more modern and fancy and lovely. But they've just done Moor Lane up so that should be at the same condition as mine now. And they've just opened a gym, free to all residents :hubba:

Tips. Now there's a good question, haha. First off when you move on, make ground rules. Sort out fridge space (shelf each, or whatever) and freezer space (shelf each or whatever you've got to work with). If you're okay with sharing, let them know. Just say "if you wanna use my stuff, you can, but clean it and put it away after you're done so I can use it too!" I'd say label everything you don't want people to use. Then they can't use the excuse of "oh I didn't know whose it was, I thought it was for everyone!":facepalm: Trust me, people do haha. Learn how to use the washing machines ASAP, then you don't look like an idiot trying to figure them out, and then you may be able to help other people out, and make friends that way other than that there's not much else. Learn to cook before you go. That's another good way to make friends too
Thank you !
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rachaelftw
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(Original post by Safiyamae)
Thank you !

You're more than welcome !
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Quiet:)
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(Original post by claireestelle)
Cant wait to wear my uniform for the first time, get a little jealous whenever I see student nurses wearing it round campus
Just to let you know that mental health nurses currently don't wear specific uniform. you just have to dress smart/casual on placement.

Learning disability nurses don't wear uniform either. As far as I am aware of, the only nursing profession that wears uniform is child and adult student/ registered nurses.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by Quiet:))
Just to let you know that mental health nurses currently don't wear specific uniform. you just have to dress smart/casual on placement.

Learning disability nurses don't wear uniform either. As far as I am aware of, the only nursing profession that wears uniform is child and adult student/ registered nurses.
I checked and Uclan gives all Student nurses a uniform, may not wear it much but asked and they wear them on wards sometimes, will be getting some smart clothes and my ward suitable shoes once i get bursary
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