Philosophy AS AQA Specimen answer- opinions?

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Fayeelizabeth
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#1
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#1
So AQA put this up on their website as a 9/9 mark answer for AS philosophy.
Outline and explain the key differences between idealism and indirect realism.
Response 4:
Both are theories of perception, but idealism is anti-realist and IR is realist. For idealism, there is no material external world (there is the mind of God for Berkeley), but for IR there is a material external world that causes our perceptions.
Idealism is a direct theory of perception – we directly perceive trees, but trees are sense data. IR is indirect – we don’t directly perceive trees but we are aware of them indirectly, through a representation of them which is direct.
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As for response 3, the student begins with a similarity, but uses it to indicate an immediate and key difference – realism/anti-realism. S/he then goes on to the second key difference – idealism as a direct theory and IR as an indirect theory of perception.
This is clear, integrated and logical and the content is correct. There is no redundancy and what the student says – in appropriate philosophical terminology – is precise.
This is a 9 mark response

Personally I'd give it 5 tops, it's very basic (wheres the explanation?) + the exam is 3 hours and this would take me like 10 minutes at most to write. Philosophy is meant to be a lot more complicated than this, especially at A level. So I was interested to know if anyone else thinks differently and why?
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TSR Jessica
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#2
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#2
Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you’ve posted in the right place? Posting in the specific Study Help forum should help get responses.

I'm going to quote in Puddles the Monkey now so she can move your thread to the right place if it's needed. :yy:

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ancienthistory
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#3
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(Original post by Fayeelizabeth)
So AQA put this up on their website as a 9/9 mark answer for AS philosophy.
Outline and explain the key differences between idealism and indirect realism.
Response 4:
Both are theories of perception, but idealism is anti-realist and IR is realist. For idealism, there is no material external world (there is the mind of God for Berkeley), but for IR there is a material external world that causes our perceptions.
Idealism is a direct theory of perception – we directly perceive trees, but trees are sense data. IR is indirect – we don’t directly perceive trees but we are aware of them indirectly, through a representation of them which is direct.
Comments
As for response 3, the student begins with a similarity, but uses it to indicate an immediate and key difference – realism/anti-realism. S/he then goes on to the second key difference – idealism as a direct theory and IR as an indirect theory of perception.
This is clear, integrated and logical and the content is correct. There is no redundancy and what the student says – in appropriate philosophical terminology – is precise.
This is a 9 mark response

Personally I'd give it 5 tops, it's very basic (wheres the explanation?) + the exam is 3 hours and this would take me like 10 minutes at most to write. Philosophy is meant to be a lot more complicated than this, especially at A level. So I was interested to know if anyone else thinks differently and why?
While the answer isn't the best, it's about being as concise and direct as you can - ensuring that you include key terminology. Hence I would, personally, deem the response worthy of 9 marks, despite it being peculiarly short considering we have 3 hours.

My teacher advised that the 15 mark questions are the important ones, which require judgement and analysis over simple recalling, whereas the 2, 5 and 9 marks do not require this.
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Fayeelizabeth
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#4
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(Original post by ancienthistory)
While the answer isn't the best, it's about being as concise and direct as you can - ensuring that you include key terminology. Hence I would, personally, deem the response worthy of 9 marks, despite it being peculiarly short considering we have 3 hours.

My teacher advised that the 15 mark questions are the important ones, which require judgement and analysis over simple recalling, whereas the 2, 5 and 9 marks do not require this.
#

Yeah I agree the conciseness of it is good, I just feel I could probably revise for half an hour the day before if answers were like this, it just seems too easy? But I guess if that's what the exam board want I'm not complaining!
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