RebekaT
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I want to start my revision for these two now but I have no idea where to start because there is so much content - does anyone have any tips or advice?!
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VannR
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(Original post by RebekaT)
I want to start my revision for these two now but I have no idea where to start because there is so much content - does anyone have any tips or advice?!
Create revision notes following this structure:

- Definitions of philosophical positions/schools of thought
- Supporting arguments for the positions
- Criticisms of the positions
- Possible relations between positions and possible solutions (likely to be personal).

Make them, read them, learn them. Then crack on with essays and past papers.

I'm a AQA Philosophy AS and A2 student this year, so I know the struggle
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RebekaT
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(Original post by VannR)
Create revision notes following this structure:

- Definitions of philosophical positions/schools of thought
- Supporting arguments for the positions
- Criticisms of the positions
- Possible relations between positions and possible solutions (likely to be personal).

Make them, read them, learn them. Then crack on with essays and past papers.

I'm a AQA Philosophy AS and A2 student this year, so I know the struggle
Thank you! Im so so stressed 😕
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Yasmin182
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For religious experience when it says examine the features of the arguments... does it mean things like, Swinburne's Testimony or do they expect you to outline the different types of religious experiences? x
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RebekaT
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(Original post by Yasmin182)
For religious experience when it says examine the features of the arguments... does it mean things like, Swinburne's Testimony or do they expect you to outline the different types of religious experiences? x
For mine I do an introduction (so outlining what a religious experience is etc), then I talk about Davis and the different factors that can lead to REs in the second paragraph, and then for the third paragraph I write about Swinburne, then I do a James paragraph and then conclude 😊
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rumana101
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(Original post by VannR)
Create revision notes following this structure:

- Definitions of philosophical positions/schools of thought
- Supporting arguments for the positions
- Criticisms of the positions
- Possible relations between positions and possible solutions (likely to be personal).

Make them, read them, learn them. Then crack on with essays and past papers.

I'm a AQA Philosophy AS and A2 student this year, so I know the struggle
Im thinking of taking this subject for AS, and i'm currently doing my GCSES. In terms of content, are the AS modules hard, and how enjoyable is the subject?

(Original post by RebekaT)
I want to start my revision for these two now but I have no idea where to start because there is so much content - does anyone have any tips or advice?!
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VannR
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(Original post by rumana101)
Im thinking of taking this subject for AS, and i'm currently doing my GCSES. In terms of content, are the AS modules hard, and how enjoyable is the subject?
I think this can be answered best by first considering what Philosophy is; essentially, it is the study of our ideas about the ourselves and the world around us. By studying it, you will be asked to look at the world in ways which you have most likely never spent any extended time doing, looking at different approaches to the most important questions which face humanity, and whose answers, if they are found, could have the most significant implications for us than what you will find in any other field. Thus, you will find the initial adjustment period a stretch of your abilities, as it should be.

However, once you get over this period, provided that you have an inquisitive mind (and don't mind writing essays), you will find studying Philosophy to be one of the most personally rewarding things that you will ever do, and I am honestly not exaggerating. I have thoroughly enjoyed studying it, and though I do not intend to study it at University, the appreciation and practice of philosophy will now always be a part of my life.

In terms of studying the subject now, it should be recognised that new syllabus has indeed changed things and made them a bit harder. Now, you will study fewer areas of philosophy, and you be asked to develop what was an 'A2' understanding of a topic at 'AS', but covering less areas of philosophy. Before, AS eased you into A2; now, AS is simply a copy of A2, but doing different subjects. However, I do not think that this should put you off in any way whatsoever. You will notice initially that the subject can be rather mind-bending, and sometimes you just can't be arsed with it, but looking back I can say that it was worth it many times over.
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rumana101
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(Original post by VannR)
I think this can be answered best by first considering what Philosophy is; essentially, it is the study of our ideas about the ourselves and the world around us. By studying it, you will be asked to look at the world in ways which you have most likely never spent any extended time doing, looking at different approaches to the most important questions which face humanity, and whose answers, if they are found, could have the most significant implications for us than what you will find in any other field. Thus, you will find the initial adjustment period a stretch of your abilities, as it should be.

However, once you get over this period, provided that you have an inquisitive mind (and don't mind writing essays), you will find studying Philosophy to be one of the most personally rewarding things that you will ever do, and I am honestly not exaggerating. I have thoroughly enjoyed studying it, and though I do not intend to study it at University, the appreciation and practice of philosophy will now always be a part of my life.

In terms of studying the subject now, it should be recognised that new syllabus has indeed changed things and made them a bit harder. Now, you will study fewer areas of philosophy, and you be asked to develop what was an 'A2' understanding of a topic at 'AS', but covering less areas of philosophy. Before, AS eased you into A2; now, AS is simply a copy of A2, but doing different subjects. However, I do not think that this should put you off in any way whatsoever. You will notice initially that the subject can be rather mind-bending, and sometimes you just can't be arsed with it, but looking back I can say that it was worth it many times over.
wow, thanks for the full over view; much appreciated. To be honest, I've looked into the content and the A2 modules such as medical ethics, afterlife, etc sound better than the AS ones such as kant's theories etc.
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