Amie_dancer
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Hey,

I am currently doing A Level English Combined and I know that I want to study English at university, I'm just not sure which one! If I did the combined choice (both Language and Literature) I would do a BA (Hons) Single honours course and not a combined honours as I feel it is better as a Single honours.

Does anyone have any experience of either courses? And which one do you think would be better in terms of job prospects/careers? I'm wondering about English teaching and working up to teach Sixth Form.

Thank you
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by Amie_dancer)
Hey,

I am currently doing A Level English Combined and I know that I want to study English at university, I'm just not sure which one! If I did the combined choice (both Language and Literature) I would do a BA (Hons) Single honours course and not a combined honours as I feel it is better as a Single honours.

Does anyone have any experience of either courses? And which one do you think would be better in terms of job prospects/careers? I'm wondering about English teaching and working up to teach Sixth Form.

Thank you
If I were to do English Lang and Lit at uni, I'd do combined because they are way more diverse. Plus, I would say even though a joint honours have same credits, I say it's still a lot more work than singles simply because it's not easy changing essay writing tactics from one subject to another and research is a lot different. So for Lang, you'd be looking at a lot of theory base and language at uni is basically the nuts and bolts and it's scientific such as learning psycholinguistics, language disorders, phonology and etc. Lit is also theory in terms of literary criticism. But they are two totally different subjects at uni.

I want to go into teaching and I would eventually want to teach Philosophy side of my degree, but when I train to become a teacher, my specialism will be in English (Literature). I wouldn't get bored of teaching English, but for me, they'd be no point in doing philosophy is I wasn't going to teach it as a teacher. And when you teach English at school, you need to be very good at more so the language side because that's the essential GCSE everyone asks for and not literature. You have Schemes of Work for books you study. But language side can be very tricky for some students so it's good to have a solid subject knowledge. Also I think it brings more opportunity like most new teachers take on responsibility such as literacy co-ordinator because of their English Lang side of their degree and etc.

I don't think there's much difference in apply for "English" or "English Language and English Literature". Only difference is English you'd get to perhaps pick from a range of modules like drama, creative writing, journalism, film and media studies. Whereas English Lang/Lit is solely on Lit and Lang stuff. So it's up to you. I personally think the more diverse the English teacher is the stronger they have an idea to teach it. English isn't about knowing all about the lit side or just the lang side - English as a whole is about both sides equally. So I say go for both.
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Amie_dancer
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
If I were to do English Lang and Lit at uni, I'd do combined because they are way more diverse. Plus, I would say even though a joint honours have same credits, I say it's still a lot more work than singles simply because it's not easy changing essay writing tactics from one subject to another and research is a lot different. So for Lang, you'd be looking at a lot of theory base and language at uni is basically the nuts and bolts and it's scientific such as learning psycholinguistics, language disorders, phonology and etc. Lit is also theory in terms of literary criticism. But they are two totally different subjects at uni.

I want to go into teaching and I would eventually want to teach Philosophy side of my degree, but when I train to become a teacher, my specialism will be in English (Literature). I wouldn't get bored of teaching English, but for me, they'd be no point in doing philosophy is I wasn't going to teach it as a teacher. And when you teach English at school, you need to be very good at more so the language side because that's the essential GCSE everyone asks for and not literature. You have Schemes of Work for books you study. But language side can be very tricky for some students so it's good to have a solid subject knowledge. Also I think it brings more opportunity like most new teachers take on responsibility such as literacy co-ordinator because of their English Lang side of their degree and etc.

I don't think there's much difference in apply for "English" or "English Language and English Literature". Only difference is English you'd get to perhaps pick from a range of modules like drama, creative writing, journalism, film and media studies. Whereas English Lang/Lit is solely on Lit and Lang stuff. So it's up to you. I personally think the more diverse the English teacher is the stronger they have an idea to teach it. English isn't about knowing all about the lit side or just the lang side - English as a whole is about both sides equally. So I say go for both.
Thank you so so much for taking the time to write such a detailed answer! You've been so helpful and I think I'm going to do the combined course because, as you said, English is about both sides and not just one. Thank you again for all of your help, and good luck with becoming a teacher!
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