B771 - Education Quality Act Watch

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Birchington
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B771 - Education Quality Act, TSR UKIP

Education Quality Act (2015):



An Act to replace Ofsted with an independent body to inspect, regulate and give guidance to services that provide education to all ages.

BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-

1. Current Educational Regulators

(1) Ofsted and the Independent Schools Inspectorate shall be merged at the end of the 2014/2015 Academic year, 31st August 2015.

2. Education Quality Commission

(1) Ofsted and the Independent Schools Inspectorate shall be replaced on the 1st September by the Education Quality Commission.
(2) The Education Quality Commission shall become a non-departmental public body of the Department for Education.
(3) The Education Quality Commission will inspect and regulate; child minding services, day care, children and young people’s social care, children’s centres, state schools, teacher training providers, Further Education colleges, CAFCASS, adoption and fostering agencies, home educators ,and academies.
i. Private schools shall retain the same level of autonomy as they do currently. Internal policies within private schools will not be subject to change following an inspection.
(4) Each inspection by the Education Quality Commission will be followed by a report and a feedback meeting within 5 working days.
(5) The Education Quality Commission board will consist of Chairperson, a Chief Executive, a Secretary and no more than 10 board members. All board meeting minutes will be made available to the public within a month of the meeting.
(6) The Education Quality Commission will employ 850 Education Quality Inspectors across England, at the current starting pay for Ofsted inspectors.
(7) Regional Inspector Service Providers shall continue to provide Additional Inspectors in their current role. No more than 1000 Additional Inspectors should be employed at any one time.
(8) Other Inspectorates currently under Ofsted’s responsibility shall be transferred to come directly under the Education Quality Commission.
(9) Reflecting the British Republic, all new inspectors employed by the Education Quality Commission shall be known as ‘Education Quality Inspectors’, replacing ‘Her Majesty’s Inspectors’. Ofsted inspectors who gained the title ‘Her Majesty’s Inspector’ may retain this honour.

3. Assessment

(1) Areas under examination by the Education Quality Commission shall be:

I. ‘Teaching and Learning’,
II. ‘Pupil Achievement’,
III. ‘Standards of Special Educational Needs/English as an Additional Language Teaching’,
IV. ‘Pupil Behaviour and Safety’
V. ‘Extra-Curricular Opportunities’
VI. ‘Staff Management and Finance’,
VII. ‘Progression against Previous Targets’,
VIII. ‘Staff Feedback’
IX. ‘Parent Feedback’,
X. ‘Governor/Trustee Feedback’
XI. ‘Facilities’

(2) Inspections shall be carried out by three inspectors appointed by the Education Quality Commission.
i. At least one of these inspectors must be a registered Education Quality Inspector.
ii. Where required, the two other inspectors may be made up from Additional Inspectors.
(3) All inspections will be carried out ‘on-the-spot’. Notice of the inspections will be given the morning of the inspection no later than 8am.
(4) The inspection may last up to a period of 3 days as seen fit by the inspection team.
(5) The feedback meeting must have a representative of the school/education facility and a representative of the trustees/governors present.
(6) All feedback meetings shall be made public. Topics of a sensitive nature or which may constitute a safeguarding issue will be withheld for a private feedback session.
(7) Inspections of organisations shall be conducted at least once every 3 academic years.

4. Grading

(1) Each organisation examined will be graded according to 5 bands, as recommended by the inspection team:

I. Outstanding
II. Good
III. Adequate
IV. Inadequate
V. Special Measures

(2) Organisations that fall within Inadequate will have 18 months to improve before a re-inspection. If recommendations and guidelines have not been met, the school shall enter Special Measures.
(3) Special Measures shall be conducted in line with current policy and guidelines in place with Ofsted.

5. Current Employees

(1) Current employees of Ofsted and the Independent Schools Inspectorate will be offered to apply for employment within the new commission in a job role similar to their current position.
(2) Redundancy will be offered for those who do not wish to apply.

6. Funding

(1) Funding shall be set at a level to reflect the merger of the two organisations, £300 million, to come from funds currently being used for Ofsted and recouped from the funds spent on employing Additional Inspectors.

Commencement, short title and extent

(1) This Act may be cited as the Education Quality Act;
(2) This bill shall extend to England; and
(3) Shall come into force on 1st September 2015
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Saracen's Fez
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Aye, a good bill.

Is 3 days long enough for an inspection in a big secondary though? I go to a pretty small one and our inspection lasted a week.
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Aph
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So up to 1850 inspectors, some of which I take are 0 hours contract? After all you have to train them all up. And they will be investigating not just schools and nurseries, child minders, and fostering?! I find that very unfeasible, especially as they are working in teams of 3!!! It takes 3 days to inspect a school. There are 24,372 schools in the uk, just schools!!! So you get at most 667 inspector teams, about 200 school days in a year, which equates to 40 school weeks. So if you employ your maximum staff they can only just get around every school in a year.
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Saracen's Fez
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(Original post by Aph)
So up to 1850 inspectors, some of which I take are 0 hours contract? After all you have to train them all up. And they will be investigating not just schools and nurseries, child minders, and fostering?! I find that very unfeasible, especially as they are working in teams of 3!!! It takes 3 days to inspect a school. There are 24,372 schools in the uk, just schools!!! So you get at most 667 inspector teams, about 200 school days in a year, which equates to 40 school weeks. So if you employ your maximum staff they can only just get around every school in a year.
You don't have an inspection every year though.
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Aph
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(Original post by O133)
You don't have an inspection every year though.
Currently if they get satisfactory it's 2 years and less then that it's the next year.
plus due to the large remit not all inspectors will be inspecting schools,
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tyroncs
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What problem is this bill trying to solve? And how is it better then the existing system?
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Aph
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(Original post by tyroncs)
What problem is this bill trying to solve? And how is it better then the existing system?
Exactly!!! But don't UKIP talk about their bills before submitting?
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barnetlad
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An independent body that works for the Department of Education? Doesn't seem independent to me.

I was reminded of the person who said 'when you reorganise you bleed'. The redundancies will cost money, how much?
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JoeL1994
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(Original post by O133)
Is 3 days long enough for an inspection in a big secondary though? I go to a pretty small one and our inspection lasted a week.
Personally I'd see 3 days as the balance between a satisfactory length of time to examine enough lessons to judge Teaching and to have the meetings after the school day with the relevant people eg. Heads, Governors, as well as collating the views of parents. The 3 days would be the inspection proper with the time after used to gather the findings as it's done now. It'd also allow inspectors to fit in more schools throughout the academic year which, as Aph pointed out, would be tight but possible.

(Original post by tyroncs)
What problem is this bill trying to solve? And how is it better then the existing system?
On the spot inspections and a guaranteed response time as well as bringing independent/faith schools under regulation to maintain standards across the board.

(Original post by barnetlad)
An independent body that works for the Department of Education? Doesn't seem independent to me.

I was reminded of the person who said 'when you reorganise you bleed'. The redundancies will cost money, how much?
The idea is based off of how the Care Quality Commission works - it remains independent of the Government but is sponsored by the relevant Department. Redundancies would have to be worked out once it was formed, there's no way of telling the split of people who would accept new jobs or not.

(Original post by Aph)
Currently if they get satisfactory it's 2 years and less then that it's the next year.
plus due to the large remit not all inspectors will be inspecting schools,
But inspectors could focus on schools during the Academic year and all other organisations at other times such as holidays and half terms.
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Aph
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(Original post by JoeL1994)
But inspectors could focus on schools during the Academic year and all other organisations at other times such as holidays and half terms.
Well that's good, I can abuse the children in my daycare until the holidays then?? Great, I know exactly when you are coming so I know what I can do and when.

Also more numbers. 55,200 child minders, 11,767 nurseries, 186 teacher training universities, 353 collages, at least 7,400 home educators, 4 cafcass offices, at least 500 adoption agencies and 1695 schools in wales, 2558 schools in Scotland, 24,372 schools in England and 1581 schools in Northern Ireland

that means assuming you do them all in 3 days, I'd prefer a week you need 1215 people out a day (Monday to Friday) to do them all once a year, assuming I could inspect fri, mon, tues. Which I can't. So because of that and half terms ect. You'd need nearly 2700 teams or nearly 8000 people!!! You only have 616 teams by this bill of which 116 are 3 officials and you think you can get away with 1000 seasonal workers.

You our need them full time to just get round everyone in 4.5 years. It's imposible.
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JoeL1994
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(Original post by Aph)
Well that's good, I can abuse the children in my daycare until the holidays then?? Great, I know exactly when you are coming so I know what I can do and when.

Also more numbers. 55,200 child minders, 11,767 nurseries, 186 teacher training universities, 353 collages, at least 7,400 home educators, 4 cafcass offices, at least 500 adoption agencies and 1695 schools in wales, 2558 schools in Scotland, 24,372 schools in England and 1581 schools in Northern Ireland
Or the children in the daycare could already be abused and treated differently or just told not to attend when the daycare gets warning of an Ofsted visit? Obviously not all inspections for the daycare/nurseries etc. would be based around school holidays, but focus shifts just as it does now with Ofsted from schools to other institutions.

The numbers are the same as they would be for Ofsted. Inspections don't take place every year however and being limited to the three days means that it'd already be clear how long an inspection would last and so planned accordingly.
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Aph
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(Original post by JoeL1994)
Or the children in the daycare could already be abused and treated differently or just told not to attend when the daycare gets warning of an Ofsted visit? Obviously not all inspections for the daycare/nurseries etc. would be based around school holidays, but focus shifts just as it does now with Ofsted from schools to other institutions.

The numbers are the same as they would be for Ofsted. Inspections don't take place every year however and being limited to the three days means that it'd already be clear how long an inspection would last and so planned accordingly.
Look at the edit.
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Tanqueray91
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One thing that I have to say, as pointed out very early on - for a large school, 3 days is nowhere near long enough to complete an inspection... The inspection of my school (~1000 pupils) usually ran 5 days in the last inspection...
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Birchington
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This is in cessation.
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Birchington
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This has gone to second reading.
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