what is lyfe
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Sup

Why does increasing the temperature of a system move the position of equilibrium in the endothermic direction

Shouldnt it move in the exothermic direction, as this would release heat into the surroundings and cool the system..

:/

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what is lyfe
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#2
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#2
Bump fam

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charco
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#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by what is lyfe)
Sup

Why does increasing the temperature of a system move the position of equilibrium in the endothermic direction

Shouldnt it move in the exothermic direction, as this would release heat into the surroundings and cool the system..

:/

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When you release heat you heat up the system under study ...
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what is lyfe
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#4
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by charco)
When you release heat you heat up the system under study ...
How though

If heat is released from the system, surely the system cools down

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Peregrine falcon
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#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by what is lyfe)
How though

If heat is released from the system, surely the system cools down

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Heat is released by the exothermic reaction which heats the system the reaction is taking place in. So to cool the system down, you would want an endothermic reaction to take in heat from the system
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what is lyfe
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#6
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by Peregrine falcon)
Heat is released by the exothermic reaction which heats the system the reaction is taking place in. So to cool the system down, you would want an endothermic reaction to take in heat from the system
So, by system, we're talking about the immediate vicinity of the reaction, and not the reaction itself?

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Peregrine falcon
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#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by what is lyfe)
So, by system, we're talking about the immediate vicinity of the reaction, and not the reaction itself?

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That's right
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what is lyfe
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#8
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by Peregrine falcon)
That's right
I see

Safe, fam

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what is lyfe
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#9
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#9
And safe to that other guy who posted here bro

Peace out

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