So, a THORIUM reactor is finally here!!!

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Spandy
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India, which has modest Uranium reserves but huge thorium reserves, recently formally began work on a thorium- based AHWR. Should be operational by 2025.
When will we start?
http://www.pocket-lint.com/news/1299...nuclear-energy
http://www.itheo.org/articles/world%...actor-designed
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slade p
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When I saw the thread I was wondering if it was about india, because I remember them talking about it and that they have huge reserves.
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Aj12
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(Original post by slade p)
When I saw the thread I was wondering if it was about india, because I remember them talking about it and that they have huge reserves.
India seems to be one of the main countries doing any research into thorium reactors.

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The_Mighty_Bush
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Good news. Hopefully it can be producing energy at a good rate in the future.
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username1533709
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Good progress. India badly needs to upgrade it's energy infrastructure.
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Pegasus2
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(Original post by The_Mighty_Bush)
Good news. Hopefully it can be producing energy at a good rate in the future.
I think there are a lot of technological problems to overcome with it and that's partly why research was abandoned by other countries after a while.

I'm not even sure it's that good tbh.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Spandy)
India, which has modest Uranium reserves but huge thorium reserves, recently formally began work on a thorium- based AHWR. Should be operational by 2025.
When will we start?
http://www.pocket-lint.com/news/1299...nuclear-energy
http://www.itheo.org/articles/world%...actor-designed
If memory serves the UK is currently involved in stuff with India and Norway. I don't think we're as far as this project but if these prove successful the idea is that we'd roll out in the 2030's.
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The_Mighty_Bush
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(Original post by Pegasus2)
I think there are a lot of technological problems to overcome with it and that's partly why research was abandoned by other countries after a while.

I'm not even sure it's that good tbh.
If they can get it working, it'll be a great thing without doubt.
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ChickenMadness
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Thought this was going to be about world of warcraft.

I am dissapointed.
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Spandy
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(Original post by Pegasus2)
I think there are a lot of technological problems to overcome with it and that's partly why research was abandoned by other countries after a while.

I'm not even sure it's that good tbh.
No, it was only the USA which was involved in this area, they had a molten salt reactor from 1971-77, but it was disbanded because a thorium reactor hardly produces any weapon-grade by products. Technological problems should not be too difficult, as India has one of the most advanced thorium research facilities. Yes, initial costs are high, but one tonne of thorium can produce energy equivalent to 200 tonnes of Uranium. Further, operation is much more safer.
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Spandy
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(Original post by Rakas21)
If memory serves the UK is currently involved in stuff with India and Norway. I don't think we're as far as this project but if these prove successful the idea is that we'd roll out in the 2030's.
Hmm... I heard that India has this ambitious program of supplying 30% of its energy by nuclear power by 2050. This will certainly play a crucial role.
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Pegasus2
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(Original post by Spandy)
No, it was only the USA which was involved in this area, they had a molten salt reactor from 1971-77, but it was disbanded because a thorium reactor hardly produces any weapon-grade by products. Technological problems should not be too difficult, as India has one of the most advanced thorium research facilities. Yes, initial costs are high, but one tonne of thorium can produce energy equivalent to 200 tonnes of Uranium. Further, operation is much more safer.
Whilst it does sound promising, just read the disadvantage list, it's almost endless:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid_...#Disadvantages

If India could get it working it would be the stop gap untill we get fusion off the ground and i'm sure other countries would follow with them. They talk of building 60 breeder reactors just to get the process started, that's a serious load of $$$ and thats just to get the process started!
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Spandy
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(Original post by Pegasus2)
Whilst it does sound promising, just read the disadvantage list, it's almost endless:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid_...#Disadvantages

If India could get it working it would be the stop gap untill we get fusion off the ground and i'm sure other countries would follow with them. They talk of building 60 breeder reactors just to get the process started, that's a serious load of $$$ and thats just to get the process started!
Rather ironically, India IS a member of the ITER project
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