What were the positives of British colonisation? Watch

JamesManc
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And European colonisation of the the world in general?
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BlackRepublican
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If you are interested I can send you my course paper on the impact of colonisation on African societies. Just send me a private message

(Original post by JamesManc)
And European colonisation of the the world in general?
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Kallisto
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(Original post by JamesManc)
And European colonisation of the the world in general?
I would say English as official language on the whole globe and (exotic) specialities in foreign cuisine for instance. Oh, don't forget to mention many mineral resources.
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DiddyDec
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The British Empire.
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Zargabaath
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Positives for Britain or for the colonies?
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miguapa
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Chocolate. Tobacco (if one smokes, I don't), sugar, potatoes, spices.

India and Africa got infrastructure.
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NativeToEurope
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Technology that was introduced by Europeans was a huge benefit of colonisation
Modern medicine
infrastructure
agricultural techniques and science
education and legal systems still used today
opening up routes for world trade
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username1649843
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The rule of law in Africa
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Kallisto
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(Original post by bolly_mad)
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As colonisation is almost associated with negative terms and thoughts, it is not wrong to name some positive aspects, if they have existed.
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German123
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(Original post by Kallisto)
I would say English as official language on the whole globe and (exotic) specialities in foreign cuisine for instance. Oh, don't forget to mention many mineral resources.
Yes, I guess that would be part of it.
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bolly_mad
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(Original post by Kallisto)
As colonisation is almost associated with negative terms and thoughts, it is not wrong to name some positive aspects, if they have existed.
The 'positives' are subjective. Depends on which side you're asking. What one side considers a positive, another may say is a negative.

One side can say giving the English language was a positive given its primacy in the modern world. The other side could say the only reason English has primacy today is because many native languages were wiped out or subordinated to English during colonisation, and that English was intentionally and deliberately positioned as the most powerful language at the cost of native languages, in order to maintain control. For example, governance and administration being out of the ability of the majority of the native population, as they could not speak, read or write the language, meaning only the British and those who were educated/influenced by British culture could do so. The English language thus removed the choice and ability of most of the native people to govern themselves and legitimised British rule.

One side can say building railways and ports improved infrastructure in the colonies. The other could say those railways and ports were not for the use of the natives, but were built to transport stolen raw materials and mineral wealth from the colonies to the industrial and manufacturing areas of Britain and Europe.

My problem with this discussion, is that anyone listing a 'positive' is likely looking at the issue from only one side, and with a great deal of ignorance of the other side.

There were no absolute positives to colonisation. There is always another side.
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NativeToEurope
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(Original post by bolly_mad)
The 'positives' are subjective. Depends on which side you're asking. What one side considers a positive, another may say is a negative.

One side can say giving the English language was a positive given its primacy in the modern world. The other side could say the only reason English has primacy today is because many native languages were wiped out or subordinated to English during colonisation, and that English was intentionally and deliberately positioned as the most powerful language at the cost of native languages, in order to maintain control. For example, governance and administration being out of the ability of the majority of the native population, as they could not speak, read or write the language, meaning only the British and those who were educated/influenced by British culture could do so. The English language thus removed the choice and ability of most of the native people to govern themselves and legitimised British rule.

One side can say building railways and ports improved infrastructure in the colonies. The other could say those railways and ports were not for the use of the natives, but were built to transport stolen raw materials and mineral wealth from the colonies to the industrial and manufacturing areas of Britain and Europe.

My problem with this discussion, is that anyone listing a 'positive' is likely looking at the issue from only one side, and with a great deal of ignorance of the other side.

There are no absolute positives to colonisation. There is always another side.

What native languages have been wiped?
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Kallisto
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(Original post by bolly_mad)
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Your summarizing is really good and I think so for the most part, namely that the British empire profited in a huge extent.
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miguapa
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(Original post by bolly_mad)
The 'positives' are subjective. Depends on which side you're asking. What one side considers a positive, another may say is a negative.

One side can say giving the English language was a positive given its primacy in the modern world. The other side could say the only reason English has primacy today is because many native languages were wiped out or subordinated to English during colonisation, and that English was intentionally and deliberately positioned as the most powerful language at the cost of native languages, in order to maintain control. For example, governance and administration being out of the ability of the majority of the native population, as they could not speak, read or write the language, meaning only the British and those who were educated/influenced by British culture could do so. The English language thus removed the choice and ability of most of the native people to govern themselves and legitimised British rule.

One side can say building railways and ports improved infrastructure in the colonies. The other could say those railways and ports were not for the use of the natives, but were built to transport stolen raw materials and mineral wealth from the colonies to the industrial and manufacturing areas of Britain and Europe.

My problem with this discussion, is that anyone listing a 'positive' is likely looking at the issue from only one side, and with a great deal of ignorance of the other side.

There were no absolute positives to colonisation. There is always another side.
Railways in India weren't used for the transportation of raw materials alone. And I think they still speak Hindi, Gujarti, Telugu like they did before the John Company got there.

I do agree though, the only people who praise the Empire were those who hark back to Britain's power, or the uneducated who don't read/learn about what colonialism actually was like.
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bolly_mad
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(Original post by NativeToEurope)
What native languages have been wiped?
Over 100 Aboriginal Australian languages have been wiped out for one.
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miguapa
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(Original post by NativeToEurope)
What native languages have been wiped?
He can only really mean Aboriginal languages in Australia or something. Last I heard, they still speak Yoruba in Nigeria, well since forever...
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DarkMagic
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(Original post by NativeToEurope)
What native languages have been wiped?
Irish Gaelic is still spoken in some places in Ireland but, outside those, you'd struggle to find someone who knows more than a few words of it.
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NativeToEurope
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(Original post by DarkMagic)
Irish Gaelic is still spoken in some places in Ireland but, outside those, you'd struggle to find someone who knows more than a few words of it.
Irish gaelic was not wiped out by The British. try again please
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NativeToEurope
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(Original post by bolly_mad)
Over 100 Aboriginal Australian languages have been wiped out for one.
What aboriginal Languages?
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bolly_mad
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(Original post by NativeToEurope)
What aboriginal Languages?
http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/...291819363.html

http://www.ctvnews.ca/dozens-of-abor...nesco-1.451581

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-20066624
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