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TSR; Do you think that mental health issues are just as bad as physical issues? watch

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    Personally I think that some types of mental health issues e.g. depression just cannot be compared with physical issues such as losing a limb. However I do think specific types of mental health (severe autism being one of these) can be compared with physical health issues.

    What do you guys think?
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    Autism isn't a mental illness. I think u need to phrase it better cause I don't understand what you are saying :confused:
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    I believe mental illness should be treated the same as physical issues, but I may be biased as what I'm going to study at university. Mental illnesses like depression should be treated like physical illnesses and people should be aware of its impact, also having a mental health issue like depression can lead to physical problems as well, such as sometimes the immune system efficiency can be loweree and lead to physical illnesses, also physical issues like losing a limb can result in mental health problems like depression. I think they are interlinked. Like yeah you can't have a new arm etc, but some people may never recover fully from depression or mental illness? If that makes sense? xxx
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    Well, it depends - obviously severe severe severe cancer is worse than having a bipolar type 2. But is, for example being diabetic better than having SEVERE schizophrenia? I don't think so. There are better, more effective meds for MOST physical conditions out there. Even losing a limb - yes, it's terrible but at least you will get an artificial one. A person locked up in their own mind, suffering, e.g from severe depression or really bad schizophrenia case will not always get help, because psych meds do not always work.
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    depends - physical illnesses are more likely to seriously hurt or kill you. I've suffered from depression before (and I mean actual "depression", not just a bit of a "bad time") but really it just took a lot of perseverance and strengthening of myself. I healed through self-determination and confidence building over time. you can't do that with physical illnesses.
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    It depends, I'd rather be a depressed soldier than a soldier with no left arm.
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    Like someone's alluded to above, many physical illnesses have cures. There aren't any actual cures for mental illnesses - yes, there's treatment but it doesn't always work. The stigma surrounding mental health means that mental illnesses and disorders aren't viewed as being in the same league as physical ailments.

    I personally think it is arguable that losing a limb is just as bad as depression because they can both be life-long problems and can have huge effects on the sufferer.
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    Depends on what mental or physical issues you are considering. I think that if you were comparing having a specific physical issue to a specific mental problem the one that is worse is the one that makes you the most unhappy. I guess the value for the unhappiness would be the magnitude of the unhappy x the length of time of being unhappy?

    E.g. Losing an arm may be normally considered a lot worse than having mild depression but if I had a choice of having one arm and still being happy/satisfied with life or having mild depression and generally being unhappy with life I would choose the former.

    I guess that's a weird way to look at it...
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    Mental issues can be worse. Some people totally refuse to accept that mental issues exist because the person appears fine. On the contrary, the toll physical issues take on you can cause mental issues. I think it's important to be considerate regardless and to accept that everyone in life may be going through hard times or good times but regardless of where we come from, a lot of us will experience the lows as well as the highs.
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    If physical diseases were treated like mental illness:



    My favourite picture on the subject.
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    (Original post by laylarose)
    Like someone's alluded to above, many physical illnesses have cures. There aren't any actual cures for mental illnesses - yes, there's treatment but it doesn't always work. The stigma surrounding mental health means that mental illnesses and disorders aren't viewed as being in the same league as physical ailments.

    I personally think it is arguable that losing a limb is just as bad as depression because they can both be life-long problems and can have huge effects on the sufferer.
    Nonsense, of course you can "cure" mental illness. At the very least many can be treated just like physical illness. Many physical illnesses lack a "cure" - there is no "cure" for cancer as such but there are many ways to deal with the problem and get rid of the symptoms (specifically defining cure might be useful here).

    The extent to which we cannot alleviate mental illness is only the extent to which we cannot remove its symptoms and just because we can't do so for all mental illnesses now doesn't mean that mental illness is any different from physical illness (we cannot alleviate the symptoms of every single physical illness either) nor that we will not be able to in the future.

    Yes, I think mental health issues are just as bad as "physical" ones. Of course in reality they are both very physical and both very real but yeah.
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    (Original post by Kyou)
    Personally I think that some types of mental health issues e.g. depression just cannot be compared with physical issues such as losing a limb. However I do think specific types of mental health (severe autism being one of these) can be compared with physical health issues.

    What do you guys think?
    I think physical illness and mental illness are too different things that can't be compared too easily. However I think they are both of equal importance.

    I think depression is often perceived as something people can just get on with but the truth is a lot of the time its difficult to live with. Given the numbers of people with depression it's shocking how little a lot of people know about it. I'm fairly sure GPs don't even have training on it, yet it one of the biggest issues people have.

    Whichever way you look at it mental health is under funded but I understand why people find it hard to understand mental health as a huge problem. I personally found it hard because I'm fortunate enough to have never had mental health issues. I think it's hard to understand it when you've never had to experience it.

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    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    Nonsense, of course you can cure mental illness. At the very least many can be treated just like physical illness. Many physical illnesses lack a cure - there is no cure for cancer as such but there are many ways to deal with the problem and get rid of the symptoms (specifically defining cure might be useful here).

    The extent to which we cannot alleviate mental illness is only the extent to which we cannot remove its symptoms and just because we can't do so for all mental illnesses now doesn't mean that mental illness is any different from physical illness (we cannot alleviate the symptoms of every single physical illness either) nor that we will not be able to in the future.

    Yes, I think mental health issues are just as bad as "physical" ones. Of course in reality they are both very physical and both very real but yeah.
    Sorry but that's bull. Have you ever met someone with severe schizophrenia? I don't think so. Yeah, you can pump that person full of antipsychotics, but all it does is sedate them. So of course you can't cure many of them, nor manage their symptoms PROPERLY.
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    (Original post by Ciel.)
    Sorry but that's bull. Have you ever met someone with severe schizophrenia? I don't think so. Yeah, you can pump that person full of antipsychotics, but all it does is sedate them. So of course you can't cure many of them, nor manage their symptoms PROPERLY.
    In principle or in practice? If we had perfect knowledge of what's going on in their head I'm sure there'd be some way given infinite resources to completely solve it.

    Similarly you can't cure someone with diabetes, sure you can pump 'em up with insulin but you know, they're still not going to be as healthy as a normal peep ceteris paribus.
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    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    In principle or in practice? If we had perfect knowledge of what's going on in their head I'm sure there'd be some way given infinite resources to completely solve it.

    Similarly you can't cure someone with diabetes, sure you can pump 'em up with insulin but you know, they're still not going to be as healthy as a normal peep ceteris paribus.
    That's the thing - we understand physical illnesses but not the mental ones, at least not fully. You know the whole talk about how low serotonin levels cause depression - it is actually impossible to measure its levels in the brain so how can they claim that?

    I can see your point but someone with diabetes will feel relatively normal, at least. Whereas many people with depression end up feeling emotionally numb from the drugs, bipolar people too sedated etc. Of course, not everyone but sadly that is the case with many.
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    yes they are just as bad. i wished i could have told my workplace that i had at one point chronic depression. once or twice i came in when my hair was greasy and i heard whispers and the word 'disgusting' was used by a manager who walked behind me at my till. I wish it was the case that i could say to my manager 'i'm not well, in this way at the moment, sorry'. and not think that i would be judged, marginalized, scapegoated, and eventually humiliated into resigning. if i had a a physical condition, i would not have felt shame to talk with people about it. But mental health is still a different bag, and i couldn't even get the words out.
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    (Original post by Tashaadaviesss)
    I believe mental illness should be treated the same as physical issues, but I may be biased as what I'm going to study at university. Mental illnesses like depression should be treated like physical illnesses and people should be aware of its impact, also having a mental health issue like depression can lead to physical problems as well, such as sometimes the immune system efficiency can be loweree and lead to physical illnesses, also physical issues like losing a limb can result in mental health problems like depression. I think they are interlinked. Like yeah you can't have a new arm etc, but some people may never recover fully from depression or mental illness? If that makes sense? xxx
    Mental health issues are a myth. On many cases it can be explained by hormones, environmental pressures and even pure retardation. Physical and genetic issues are of more importance. We should direct any mental health funding to the likes of cancer.
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    (Original post by Ciel.)
    That's the thing - we understand physical illnesses but not the mental ones, at least not fully. You know the whole talk about how low serotonin levels cause depression - it is actually impossible to measure its levels in the brain so how can they claim that?

    I can see your point but someone with diabetes will feel relatively normal, at least. Whereas many people with depression end up feeling emotionally numb from the drugs, bipolar people too sedated etc. Of course, not everyone but sadly that is the case with many.
    I'm sure there's a better example than diabetes I'm just not well versed in it really because I haven't had to work with such ill people or such elderly people and I have no real ailments myself.

    There must however be an array of chronic physical illnesses that are never properly solvable and also we fail to fully understand.

    The thing is, mental illness is a just an "illness" to do with the brain. It just so happens we know very little about the brain compared to the rest of the body, hence our treatments of brain-problems is going to be inferior to that of elsewhere, but the way you say "there are no cures to brain problems, yet there are cures to other problems" implies the brain is something special. Like it's problems are in principle impossible to solve. They're not. It's just we cannot do so yet. There's no reason to think however that we will not be able to in the future - as with many currently misunderstood and not properly treatable physical illnesses. One that comes to mind upon further thought is the condition of having "suicide headaches".
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    (Original post by The two eds)
    Mental health issues are a myth. On many cases it can be explained by hormones, environmental pressures and even pure retardation. Physical and genetic issues are of more importance. We should direct any mental health funding to the likes of cancer.
    People have the right to their opinion obviously, but it's opinions like this are why I'm becoming a nurse and specialising in mental health due to the stigma involved. Mental health illnesses are not a myth, it's the same with physical illnesses, such as hormone imbalance can lead to a greater risk of depression etc, whereas being overweight, smoking etc can lead to a greater risk of issues even like cancer. Both mental health and physical issues have the same importance in my opinion, like I said they're interlinked, if you leave someone with depression they can develop physical issues, and visa versa. Both effect the health of a person and therefore should be treated equally, and people should be more aware of mental illnesses especially in the world where mental health illnesses are on the increase. Just because you can explain some of the factors which increase the risk of developing mental health illnesses doesn't mean it's not important, I can name risks for physical illnesses. I don't think either is more important than then the other, they both will affect the persons health, can lead to death and effect the quality of life, so they both need funding to make sure they can actually help everyone, with various illnesses, rather than just cancer.
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    *sighs* So much stupid, so little time.

    You can have an amazing quality of life despite having a severe mental or physical illness/disability. Likewise you can have a terrible quality of life with the same. Things that matter:

    - a good support network (personal and medical if necessary)
    - good insight into your condition
    - adaptations/adjustments of your environment where necessary
    - medication where appropriate (preferably with non-severe side-effects)
    - understanding from society, or at the very least lack of stigma
    - leading a purposeful life

    etc. These things matter irregardless of the type of illness or disability.
 
 
 
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