Valyrian
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Hey Guys :woohoo:

Anyone else doing LIT1C (Struggle for Identity) on Friday 15th May?

How is revision coming along?

What do you predict this year for the topic choice in the contextual linking section of the paper?

Have you done much wider reading?

How are you finding it?
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by Valyrian)
Hey Guys :woohoo:

Anyone else doing LIT1C (Struggle for Identity) on Friday 15th May?

How is revision coming along?

What do you predict this year for the topic choice in the contextual linking section of the paper?

Have you done much wider reading?

How are you finding it?
Heya, I'm going to put this in the English forum for you as you should get more responses there.You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you!http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=82
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lilacunicorn
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(Original post by Valyrian)
Hey Guys :woohoo:

Anyone else doing LIT1C (Struggle for Identity) on Friday 15th May?

How is revision coming along?

What do you predict this year for the topic choice in the contextual linking section of the paper?

Have you done much wider reading?

How are you finding it?
I'm doing LIT1C I'm finding it alright considering my English teachers are incompetent as hell...

I've just been going through past papers and writing quites for my wider reading. I'm now attempting to do a past question. How are you revising and what texts are you studying for wider reading? I'm doing The Kite Runner, A Streetcar Named Desire and Howl.
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Valyrian
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(Original post by lilacunicorn)
I'm doing LIT1C I'm finding it alright considering my English teachers are incompetent as hell...

I've just been going through past papers and writing quites for my wider reading. I'm now attempting to do a past question. How are you revising and what texts are you studying for wider reading? I'm doing The Kite Runner, A Streetcar Named Desire and Howl.
I'm doing OK for the Context Question section but the Poetry side is a bit dodgy.
Umm Streetcar Named Desire, A View from The Bridge and The Handmaid's Tale
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lilacunicorn
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(Original post by Valyrian)
I'm doing OK for the Context Question section but the Poetry side is a bit dodgy.
Umm Streetcar Named Desire, A View from The Bridge and The Handmaid's Tale
I'm finding contextual linking extremely stressful, especially knowing that it's unseen. What poems will you refer to in Q1?
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Berninger1864
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I am also finding the contextual bit so difficult. I don't know what counts as a similarity as the extract sure has some differences with the wider readings. So I just don't know what to classify as a similarity except differences which is ok.

As for linking it with my wider reading, it's tricky too because usually I get comments on my mocks saying the links are 'forced'.

Would anyone care to help me with some sentence starts that'd 'flow' with the extract analysis.

I'm aiming for atleast 35 marks for the extract and 35 for poetry. So any advice is appreciated!

Thanks!


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Valyrian
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(Original post by lilacunicorn)
I'm finding contextual linking extremely stressful, especially knowing that it's unseen. What poems will you refer to in Q1?
The poems I'll refer to really depends on the theme of the extract, e.g war, sexuality, racism, displacement etc

(Original post by Berninger1864)
I am also finding the contextual bit so difficult. I don't know what counts as a similarity as the extract sure has some differences with the wider readings. So I just don't know what to classify as a similarity except differences which is ok. As for linking it with my wider reading, it's tricky too because usually I get comments on my mocks saying the links are 'forced'. Would anyone care to help me with some sentence starts that'd 'flow' with the extract analysis. I'm aiming for atleast 35 marks for the extract and 35 for poetry. So any advice is appreciated!Thanks! Posted from TSR Mobile
Just like the post before, it really depends on your themes to decide how to link the wider reading texts in similarity or differences. I would usually refer to a piece of the extract and interlink my wider reading choice as opposed to analysing the unseen extract completely separately to the links because it feels really misplaced.
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AnkitKapoor
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(Original post by Berninger1864)
I am also finding the contextual bit so difficult. I don't know what counts as a similarity as the extract sure has some differences with the wider readings. So I just don't know what to classify as a similarity except differences which is ok.

As for linking it with my wider reading, it's tricky too because usually I get comments on my mocks saying the links are 'forced'.

Would anyone care to help me with some sentence starts that'd 'flow' with the extract analysis.

I'm aiming for atleast 35 marks for the extract and 35 for poetry. So any advice is appreciated!

Thanks!


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Hi!

I apologize for this incredibly long answer.

I agree, teachers are vague when it comes to the level of contextual analysis requiredI'm going to email my teacher and ask them to send me essays which have got good grades and see their level of contextual analysis. From looking at past papers, I think you should get a basic understanding of gay rights, gender, Creation of african countries, post war E U conflicts, Refugees, dual identities, class post war, apartheid and the Irish troubles.

In terms of similarities, anything linked in theme, technique, tone, but it's usually best to link in content. For example, if the extract is on refugees feeling displaced, link to something about feeling displaced, or better, you could link to refugees.

To link, I was taught shorter the better. Literally 'Similarly'. That's it. Another tip, to tighten your answer but remain tentative, just say 'arguably' or something similar. It's better than 'It is perhaps arguable to suggest that the author may also be portraying' yada yada yada.

The more wider reading you have the better, to make your links sound less forced I'd advise you to analyse more literature on the surface and less indepth. As in 8 plays with short but solid analysis of relevant themes is maybe better than 2 plays with analysis on every theme, even those which are not relevant. Try not to over load yourself, poems are good ways to make content links as they're faster to get through.

The most helpful thing I've learnt is to keep it really tied to the extract, wider reading can just be hear and there where you see fit. But stitch everything up with analysis to the extract, and attempt to sound contextual ( basically refer to what's going on in the world when the thing was written) But the extract's the most important thing. In terms of structural analysis, simply ' The extract begins like' 'then it slides into'. I tend to do this while analyzing any changes in tone.

Good luck!
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Berninger1864
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(Original post by AnkitKapoor)
Hi!

I apologize for this incredibly long answer.

I agree, teachers are vague when it comes to the level of contextual analysis requiredI'm going to email my teacher and ask them to send me essays which have got good grades and see their level of contextual analysis. From looking at past papers, I think you should get a basic understanding of gay rights, gender, Creation of african countries, post war E U conflicts, Refugees, dual identities, class post war, apartheid and the Irish troubles.

In terms of similarities, anything linked in theme, technique, tone, but it's usually best to link in content. For example, if the extract is on refugees feeling displaced, link to something about feeling displaced, or better, you could link to refugees.

To link, I was taught shorter the better. Literally 'Similarly'. That's it. Another tip, to tighten your answer but remain tentative, just say 'arguably' or something similar. It's better than 'It is perhaps arguable to suggest that the author may also be portraying' yada yada yada.

The more wider reading you have the better, to make your links sound less forced I'd advise you to analyse more literature on the surface and less indepth. As in 8 plays with short but solid analysis of relevant themes is maybe better than 2 plays with analysis on every theme, even those which are not relevant. Try not to over load yourself, poems are good ways to make content links as they're faster to get through.

The most helpful thing I've learnt is to keep it really tied to the extract, wider reading can just be hear and there where you see fit. But stitch everything up with analysis to the extract, and attempt to sound contextual ( basically refer to what's going on in the world when the thing was written) But the extract's the most important thing. In terms of structural analysis, simply ' The extract begins like' 'then it slides into'. I tend to do this while analyzing any changes in tone.

Good luck!
Thanks for the useful tips. However, how on earth are we supposed to get through mentioning 8 plays let alone the recommended: one poem, prose and a play. Needless to say, we have only ONE HOUR for the extract in depth analysis, contextual references and the wider readings.

My teacher said it would be best to add wider readings at the end, and I've been so used to doing this so I need to use all the time from now to combine it with my extract because it seems best fitting.

Really need this A but stuck on low B's. HELP!
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AnkitKapoor
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(Original post by Berninger1864)
Thanks for the useful tips. However, how on earth are we supposed to get through mentioning 8 plays let alone the recommended: one poem, prose and a play. Needless to say, we have only ONE HOUR for the extract in depth analysis, contextual references and the wider readings.

My teacher said it would be best to add wider readings at the end, and I've been so used to doing this so I need to use all the time from now to combine it with my extract because it seems best fitting.

Really need this A but stuck on low B's. HELP!
Hi, sorry for not being clearer earlier, I meant look at 8 plays in total! Of course, only use one or two in the exams. I've been getting As- full marks, and what I found made the difference was writing style. Basically, lead your answer with meaning rather than technique. I hope that makes some sense? But you're keen to do well and have given it a lot of thought, I think your teacher may be marking a little harsh. Either way, I'm sure you'll do great! There's still enough time, reading some critical essays online can really help.

Good luck
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Cherry82
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Hey everyone, I was going to ask does anyone know how you would quote a line from a poem that includes quotation marks? I want to use a line from a poem however because it already has quotation marks in it, I wouldn't know how to add punctuation to differentiate and show it's a quote:'A fair go' thoseuntruthful words I do recall
There is no such athing as a 'fair go for all'.


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Imanil8
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Thank you very much for this

(Original post by AnkitKapoor)
Hi!

I apologize for this incredibly long answer.

I agree, teachers are vague when it comes to the level of contextual analysis requiredI'm going to email my teacher and ask them to send me essays which have got good grades and see their level of contextual analysis. From looking at past papers, I think you should get a basic understanding of gay rights, gender, Creation of african countries, post war E U conflicts, Refugees, dual identities, class post war, apartheid and the Irish troubles.

In terms of similarities, anything linked in theme, technique, tone, but it's usually best to link in content. For example, if the extract is on refugees feeling displaced, link to something about feeling displaced, or better, you could link to refugees.

To link, I was taught shorter the better. Literally 'Similarly'. That's it. Another tip, to tighten your answer but remain tentative, just say 'arguably' or something similar. It's better than 'It is perhaps arguable to suggest that the author may also be portraying' yada yada yada.

The more wider reading you have the better, to make your links sound less forced I'd advise you to analyse more literature on the surface and less indepth. As in 8 plays with short but solid analysis of relevant themes is maybe better than 2 plays with analysis on every theme, even those which are not relevant. Try not to over load yourself, poems are good ways to make content links as they're faster to get through.

The most helpful thing I've learnt is to keep it really tied to the extract, wider reading can just be hear and there where you see fit. But stitch everything up with analysis to the extract, and attempt to sound contextual ( basically refer to what's going on in the world when the thing was written) But the extract's the most important thing. In terms of structural analysis, simply ' The extract begins like' 'then it slides into'. I tend to do this while analyzing any changes in tone.

Good luck!
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lilacunicorn
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(Original post by AnkitKapoor)
Hi, sorry for not being clearer earlier, I meant look at 8 plays in total! Of course, only use one or two in the exams. I've been getting As- full marks, and what I found made the difference was writing style. Basically, lead your answer with meaning rather than technique. I hope that makes some sense? But you're keen to do well and have given it a lot of thought, I think your teacher may be marking a little harsh. Either way, I'm sure you'll do great! There's still enough time, reading some critical essays online can really help.

Good luck
Could you by any chance share one of your essays?
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AnkitKapoor
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Of course

I'll put a paragraph in here, just to make sure it's what you're looking for.

After this, the speech travels back in time to Mandela’s ‘youth’, marking a dramatic change in tone from fiery patriotism and power to something gentler, yet equally emotive. Talking of his youth is a sharp twist of identity compared to the criminal the jury currently see before them. Mandela talks of the ‘old days’, the ‘fatherland’ and it’s stories, portraying how identity is preserved in place and language. His language itself becomes more romantic, with an almost fairy tale mistiness in ‘amongst the tales’, which perhaps is reflective of South African heritage fading due to western influences. This in the African words which follow, ironically seeming to drown in the sea of english, a medium which has almost been imposed on the nation. The tight, listing effect of the names portrays South African identity as almost squeezed together, violently displaced by colonial rule. The African names are listed in pairs, perhaps suggesting a unity, and the syndeton creates a rhythm which expands, creating an almost celebratory tone. The very names themselves are rhythmic, having inflection towards the end, ‘Bambata’, ‘Disgane’, creating a certain lightness, even giving the speech a more optimistic tone, perhaps once again to reassure his black audience that their struggle for identity could be overcome.
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Berninger1864
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(Original post by AnkitKapoor)
Of course

I'll put a paragraph in here, just to make sure it's what you're looking for.

After this, the speech travels back in time to Mandela’s ‘youth’, marking a dramatic change in tone from fiery patriotism and power to something gentler, yet equally emotive. Talking of his youth is a sharp twist of identity compared to the criminal the jury currently see before them. Mandela talks of the ‘old days’, the ‘fatherland’ and it’s stories, portraying how identity is preserved in place and language. His language itself becomes more romantic, with an almost fairy tale mistiness in ‘amongst the tales’, which perhaps is reflective of South African heritage fading due to western influences. This in the African words which follow, ironically seeming to drown in the sea of english, a medium which has almost been imposed on the nation. The tight, listing effect of the names portrays South African identity as almost squeezed together, violently displaced by colonial rule. The African names are listed in pairs, perhaps suggesting a unity, and the syndeton creates a rhythm which expands, creating an almost celebratory tone. The very names themselves are rhythmic, having inflection towards the end, ‘Bambata’, ‘Disgane’, creating a certain lightness, even giving the speech a more optimistic tone, perhaps once again to reassure his black audience that their struggle for identity could be overcome.
can you give an example of how you would blend your wider reading in with the extract? this was so great!
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AnkitKapoor
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(Original post by Berninger1864)
can you give an example of how you would blend your wider reading in with the extract? this was so great!

Sure! Remember I did none of this in timed conditions. I hope this helps, I know how stressful exams can be.

Contrastingly, due to it’s form Milk’s speech focuses greatly on the collective struggle, as highlighted by ‘you, you and you’, a scorching combination of direct address and repetition to simultaneously unites and lift the spirits of each and every member in the room. This message is extended even out of the room, echoing Dr. King’s speech ‘Altoona, Pennsylvania and the Richmond’ likening the gay struggle to the black struggle to prove society has once again made a mistake, as well a to perhaps play on his larger audience’s feeling of patriotism, creating space for gay people in America. By likening the gay struggle to other struggles, ‘seniors’ ‘blacks’ ‘handicapped’. Milk almost unites minorities. However, in Bent, minorities were against each other, many complained that it was wrong to portray that ‘it’s better to be a jew than a queer in Nazi Germany. Being in the speech form, Milk’s repetition of the word ‘hope’ creates almost a glowing chant and rhythm, almost portraying the idea of hope as abstract and spiritual, perhaps a filler for the lack of religious influence homosexuals would be expected to have. The idea of the gay struggle as a spiritual battle or martyrdom is also apparent in ‘Ashes’ due to it’s spiritual imagery mentioning ‘thorns’, the ‘bible’ and ‘christ’. Even Bent portrays this idea, Max and Horst ‘feel’ each other yet never touch, portraying sexuality as elevated from the body, souls connect in a less earthly sphere. However, in Bent this elevation is through love, which is given a greater power than hope.
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lilacunicorn
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(Original post by AnkitKapoor)
Of course

I'll put a paragraph in here, just to make sure it's what you're looking for.

After this, the speech travels back in time to Mandela’s ‘youth’, marking a dramatic change in tone from fiery patriotism and power to something gentler, yet equally emotive. Talking of his youth is a sharp twist of identity compared to the criminal the jury currently see before them. Mandela talks of the ‘old days’, the ‘fatherland’ and it’s stories, portraying how identity is preserved in place and language. His language itself becomes more romantic, with an almost fairy tale mistiness in ‘amongst the tales’, which perhaps is reflective of South African heritage fading due to western influences. This in the African words which follow, ironically seeming to drown in the sea of english, a medium which has almost been imposed on the nation. The tight, listing effect of the names portrays South African identity as almost squeezed together, violently displaced by colonial rule. The African names are listed in pairs, perhaps suggesting a unity, and the syndeton creates a rhythm which expands, creating an almost celebratory tone. The very names themselves are rhythmic, having inflection towards the end, ‘Bambata’, ‘Disgane’, creating a certain lightness, even giving the speech a more optimistic tone, perhaps once again to reassure his black audience that their struggle for identity could be overcome.
Thanks a lot! How would you structure out Section A? I'm struggling with the how to lay out my points apart from the obvious PEEL structure. In particular, how would you structure out one of your points and speak of FSL?
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lilacunicorn
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Can someone read this and tell me if it's any good? How can I improve? Thanks I'm struggling with Section A pretty badly.

In the extract taken from an article published in June 2010 for the Independent, there are many ways in which the writer Don Mullan presents his struggle for identity. The extract speaks of an incident that took place in 1972, many years prior to the article being published, about Bloody Sunday in Northern Ireland. With the extract being written in first person and present tense, Mullan presents himself as he was when the event took place. Moreover, with his paragraphs being of a short length, he reveals his overall feelings of panic and trauma. Indeed, this is to be expected from an experience which killed many innocent lives as well as destroying numerous homes and towns. This article differs to other writers such as Hosseini, Williams and Ginsberg also exploring the struggle for identity due to the different context and form. However, through themes such as dislocation, trauma and loss, the article simultaneously compares to these works.

One of the ways in which Mullan presents his thoughts and feelings is through speaking of his sense of confusion and dislocation within his own mind as this event took place. “What I know is somewhere hidden in my subconscious” he states. Through speaking of his incapability to remember the key details of what took place, the immense amount of shock he had experienced on the day. Indeed, it was at such an extent where his conscious mind was forced to forget it in order for his own survival. Moreover, Mullan seems to suggest that although this reflex reaction conducted by his brain was for his own good, he is aware that memories and thoughts can never be permanently eradicated. Thus, he presents his feeling of dislocation within his own mind as without the details that are “hidden” in his subconscious, he is unable to put together the pieces and make sense from the experience.

Similarly, Williams also presents a sense of dislocation in the form of a play. Through the symbolic use of props such as a red lantern, Williams presents Blanche, the main protagonist, as being incapable to accept reality. Blanche states how she “cannot stand a naked bulb any more than a rude remark” whilst she places an “adorable little coloured paper lantern” onto the “naked bulb”. Whilst the baked bulb represents reality, Blanche’s urge to cover this bulb with a red lantern foreshadows the danger that is destined in Blanche’s life where she will be transferred into a mental institution. Moroever, the actions of Blanche emphasise her fear of accepting reality. With the naked bulb symbolising reality, she feels the urge to cover it as though it would cause in a great loss if she did not. Thus, through the symbolism of a bulb and lantern, Williams presents Blanche’s sense of dislocation as she constantly avoids any encountering with reality.
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AnkitKapoor
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(Original post by lilacunicorn)
Thanks a lot! How would you structure out Section A? I'm struggling with the how to lay out my points apart from the obvious PEEL structure. In particular, how would you structure out one of your points and speak of FSL?

I wouldnt over think it. If your ideas flow from one to another in your mind, they should flow out in the page. In terms of form structure and language I just integrate them to support the point I'm making. So if I'm talking of about suppression, I might refer to language which feels tightly controlled or describes controls, like the image of 'chains' or what ever. I'd then dig out a structure point, lists often make things feel tight, or short sentences or very tight rhyme. My weakest point is form ( but its really similar to structure ), it's harder to analyse. If it's a diary, you can comment on whether or not it was intended for others to see, or is it just a personal struggle. My biggest advice would also be to read critical essays, and essays which got good marks ( PESTER YOUR TEACHERS TO GIVE YOU THEM) as it really helps show you what you have to do, which isn't always clear with this question.

I wouldnt bind yourself in terms of structure p, just try and make sure you get them all in and find links from one sentence of your essay to the next so it flows ( working chronologically can help but remember you don't have time to analyse everything).
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angellec
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I'm also taking this exam on Friday 15th May and have found this thread really helpful! To go back to the thread starter does anyone have any predictions for the extract?
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