haa87
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Right i want a new phone but not sure which one? Everyone else has iphone so im thinking i should get iPhone but then Samsung is good phone also like its features so im confused which to get?
So iphone or Android? Which phone shall i get?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Gofre
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
For the sake of making the comparison a bit simpler I'll be comparing current gen iPhones vs current gen flagship-grade Android phones, if oyu compared the entire market then there's way too many factors. Anyways, pro's are marked with a +, cons with a -, obviously;

Android:
Spoiler:
Show
+Hardware variety. Being an open platform, Android phones come in wildly differing shapes and sizes. This means that regardless of what you're looking for in a phone, odds are the ecosystem has something that will appeal to your needs. Whether it's something relatively dainty (by modern standards) like the Xperia Z3 Compact or a gargantuan slab of phone like the Nexus 6, the top notch cameras on Samsung's phones or the killer speakers on HTC's, there's tonnes of stuff to choose from at any given moment so you're never stuck for choice!
+Customisable software. This is probably the big one for most people, Android phones give you free reign to customise and tweak the life out of your phone's software. That could be installing a cool set of icons, using a third party home screen launcher to change how you navigate through the interface, or rooting and installing custom ROMs to add radically new features and functions. It can be as involving or uninvolving as you want.
+Price drops and spec wars. Apple exist in their own little bubble of supply and demand, they put out a new generation of phones once a year and people know to expect them and prices tend to stay pretty static in the meantime. The Android market on the other hand is continually evolving and shifting, with new phones coming out almost weekly from a large number of manufacturers. This competition invariably leads to more competitive pricing, with the cost of handsets and contracts alike generally lowering gradually as newer products come out to challenge the desirability of what's currently being sold. For example looking at the last generation of flagships, all killer phones still, the LG G3 is already selling regularly for under £300 and the HTC One M8 and Galaxy S6 are dropping to around and under the £300 mark.
+Google services support. If you're a big user of Gmail, Google Plus, Chromebooks etc, then the deep integration with the OS of all these services may be a major perk.

-Software support and fragmentation. One disadvantage of manufacturers constantly putting out new models using an operating system made by a completely separate company (which they then need to spend time tweaking to use their custom skins and interfaces) is that software support can be downright patchy when compared to Apple. It generally takes several months for new Android versions to reach even flagship phones after each version is released, and they generally receive updates for a shorter period of time than Apple as manufacturers begin prioritising their newer and upcoming phones. For example Samsung flagship quality phones (the Galaxy S and Galaxy Note lines) have on average received new Android versions 18-24 months after their release, while the iPhone line average closer to three years.
-Apps. This one is minor, a hell of a lot more minor than it was two years ago, but iOS still has a slight edge on apps. In quantity, not so much, but because Android apps have to cater to hundreds of potential combinations of screen size, screen resolution and internal horsepower, they can often feel less refined than their iOS versions which in comparison only have a very small pool of very specific spec combinations to optimise for. And if an app is going to be launched on a single platform to begin with, the majority of the time it goes to iOS first.


iPhone
Spoiler:
Show
+High quality hardware with well optimised software. There's no getting around that every new generation of iPhone to be released feels like a premium phone at the time of its release, and Apple put extensive effort into optimising their OS for them. If you never look up from the spec lists then Android flagships will appear superior, but when it comes to actually using the things you quickly realise it's pretty irrelevant- iPhones still run processors with far fewer cores and lower speeds than top end 'Droids yet outperform the competition at time of launch when it comes to benchmarking and feel just as fluid from a usability perspective, the camera is a much lower resolution than 95% of Android flagships from the last few years yet take pictures as good as the best Android phones available, the screens are lower resolution than the best Android phones but are still plenty pixel dense enough and look gorgeous, and so on. At the end of the day, choosing between iPhone and Android flagship based on specs alone is redundant- choose whichever you prefer using!
+Software longevity. As mentioned above, iPhones get OS updates for longer than virtually all Android phones that do not have the word "Nexus" in the name, meaning if you want a phone to last as long as humanly possible you stand a better chance of staying up to date with the latest features for longer on an iPhone.
+Apple services and support. If you're an extensive user of OS X, iCloud and their associated services, then the deep integration into iOS could be a major perk. Apple also typically have the best implemented and adopted fingerprint, security and mobile payment services on the market. Samsung and Google are both looking to make major strides in these areas this year, but as of now Apple does it best. Apple also have a much better technical support system than virtually any other brand- almost every major city in the country has an Apple store where you can book an appointment, take your phone to be looked at and have issues diagnosed and resolved often without ever leaving the post code and quite often with no associated labour charges. Don't expect a free repair if you damage it yourself though- they're not a charity.
Tiny phones. Phones are big now, and most people don't care at this point. However if you want a truly tiny phone the iPhone 5S is probably the only thing on the market that's worth considering anymore. Even at the 4.7" screen size of the iPhone 6 competition is limited, and it's a very strong contender.

-Walled garden ecosystem. It's an undeniable fact that you can't do as much customising with iOS. 8 years later and we're still limited to a basic grid of apps and folders, widgets are an afterthought at best, you can't install apps from any other source but the App store and Apple's proprietary Lightning port means you need specific Apple accessories compared to the ubiquitous micro USB port used by every other manufacturer. All the core functionality you'd find in Android are there, and Jailbreaking is still alive and well, but if customisability is a priority then Android undeniably does it better.
-Limited hardware selection. Apple have a very small number of handsets on sale at a time, which while great for some reasons also sucks for some others. If there's a specific set of features you want from your phone, odds are there's something from Android that can cater to you. With the iPhone, unless you're precisely describing one of three or four models then you're going to have to make compromises.
-Price: iPhones are popular and will probably always be popular, and as such prices stay as high as the premium status they've achieved. Deals are few and far between and prices rarely drop much between generations, making it a potentially more expensive prospect than an Android phone released around the same time.
0
reply
TornadoGR4
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
I've had both (as well as Windows) and definitely prefer Android. I can't really explain it, the iPhone just felt dull & boring to me.

(Original post by Gofre)
For the sake of making the comparison a bit simpler I'll be comparing current gen iPhones vs current gen flagship-grade Android phones, if oyu compared the entire market then there's way too many factors. Anyways, pro's are marked with a +, cons with a -, obviously;

Android:
Spoiler:
Show
+Hardware variety. Being an open platform, Android phones come in wildly differing shapes and sizes. This means that regardless of what you're looking for in a phone, odds are the ecosystem has something that will appeal to your needs. Whether it's something relatively dainty (by modern standards) like the Xperia Z3 Compact or a gargantuan slab of phone like the Nexus 6, the top notch cameras on Samsung's phones or the killer speakers on HTC's, there's tonnes of stuff to choose from at any given moment so you're never stuck for choice!
+Customisable software. This is probably the big one for most people, Android phones give you free reign to customise and tweak the life out of your phone's software. That could be installing a cool set of icons, using a third party home screen launcher to change how you navigate through the interface, or rooting and installing custom ROMs to add radically new features and functions. It can be as involving or uninvolving as you want.
+Price drops and spec wars. Apple exist in their own little bubble of supply and demand, they put out a new generation of phones once a year and people know to expect them and prices tend to stay pretty static in the meantime. The Android market on the other hand is continually evolving and shifting, with new phones coming out almost weekly from a large number of manufacturers. This competition invariably leads to more competitive pricing, with the cost of handsets and contracts alike generally lowering gradually as newer products come out to challenge the desirability of what's currently being sold. For example looking at the last generation of flagships, all killer phones still, the LG G3 is already selling regularly for under £300 and the HTC One M8 and Galaxy S6 are dropping to around and under the £300 mark.
+Google services support. If you're a big user of Gmail, Google Plus, Chromebooks etc, then the deep integration with the OS of all these services may be a major perk.

-Software support and fragmentation. One disadvantage of manufacturers constantly putting out new models using an operating system made by a completely separate company (which they then need to spend time tweaking to use their custom skins and interfaces) is that software support can be downright patchy when compared to Apple. It generally takes several months for new Android versions to reach even flagship phones after each version is released, and they generally receive updates for a shorter period of time than Apple as manufacturers begin prioritising their newer and upcoming phones. For example Samsung flagship quality phones (the Galaxy S and Galaxy Note lines) have on average received new Android versions 18-24 months after their release, while the iPhone line average closer to three years.
-Apps. This one is minor, a hell of a lot more minor than it was two years ago, but iOS still has a slight edge on apps. In quantity, not so much, but because Android apps have to cater to hundreds of potential combinations of screen size, screen resolution and internal horsepower, they can often feel less refined than their iOS versions which in comparison only have a very small pool of very specific spec combinations to optimise for. And if an app is going to be launched on a single platform to begin with, the majority of the time it goes to iOS first.


iPhone
Spoiler:
Show
+High quality hardware with well optimised software. There's no getting around that every new generation of iPhone to be released feels like a premium phone at the time of its release, and Apple put extensive effort into optimising their OS for them. If you never look up from the spec lists then Android flagships will appear superior, but when it comes to actually using the things you quickly realise it's pretty irrelevant- iPhones still run processors with far fewer cores and lower speeds than top end 'Droids yet outperform the competition at time of launch when it comes to benchmarking and feel just as fluid from a usability perspective, the camera is a much lower resolution than 95% of Android flagships from the last few years yet take pictures as good as the best Android phones available, the screens are lower resolution than the best Android phones but are still plenty pixel dense enough and look gorgeous, and so on. At the end of the day, choosing between iPhone and Android flagship based on specs alone is redundant- choose whichever you prefer using!
+Software longevity. As mentioned above, iPhones get OS updates for longer than virtually all Android phones that do not have the word "Nexus" in the name, meaning if you want a phone to last as long as humanly possible you stand a better chance of staying up to date with the latest features for longer on an iPhone.
+Apple services and support. If you're an extensive user of OS X, iCloud and their associated services, then the deep integration into iOS could be a major perk. Apple also typically have the best implemented and adopted fingerprint, security and mobile payment services on the market. Samsung and Google are both looking to make major strides in these areas this year, but as of now Apple does it best. Apple also have a much better technical support system than virtually any other brand- almost every major city in the country has an Apple store where you can book an appointment, take your phone to be looked at and have issues diagnosed and resolved often without ever leaving the post code and quite often with no associated labour charges. Don't expect a free repair if you damage it yourself though- they're not a charity.
Tiny phones. Phones are big now, and most people don't care at this point. However if you want a truly tiny phone the iPhone 5S is probably the only thing on the market that's worth considering anymore. Even at the 4.7" screen size of the iPhone 6 competition is limited, and it's a very strong contender.

-Walled garden ecosystem. It's an undeniable fact that you can't do as much customising with iOS. 8 years later and we're still limited to a basic grid of apps and folders, widgets are an afterthought at best, you can't install apps from any other source but the App store and Apple's proprietary Lightning port means you need specific Apple accessories compared to the ubiquitous micro USB port used by every other manufacturer. All the core functionality you'd find in Android are there, and Jailbreaking is still alive and well, but if customisability is a priority then Android undeniably does it better.
-Limited hardware selection. Apple have a very small number of handsets on sale at a time, which while great for some reasons also sucks for some others. If there's a specific set of features you want from your phone, odds are there's something from Android that can cater to you. With the iPhone, unless you're precisely describing one of three or four models then you're going to have to make compromises.
-Price: iPhones are popular and will probably always be popular, and as such prices stay as high as the premium status they've achieved. Deals are few and far between and prices rarely drop much between generations, making it a potentially more expensive prospect than an Android phone released around the same time.
Top post :yy:
0
reply
User1686961
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
iPhone. lol
0
reply
ImNotSuperman
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by haa87)
Everyone else has iphone so im thinking i should get iPhone
This pretty much sums up the whole iPhone vs Android debate
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you ever signed up for an open day and then not gone to it?

Yes (28)
44.44%
No (35)
55.56%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed