In benzene, why are carbons 2,4 and 6 more susceptible to electrophillic substitutio?

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jojo1995
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In benzene, why are carbons 2,4 and 6 more susceptible to electrophillic substitution?
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by jojo1995)
In benzene, why are carbons 2,4 and 6 more susceptible to electrophillic substitution?
thanks
Heya, I'm going to put this in the chemistry forum for you as you should get more responses there.

You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you!

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=130
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charliebe2
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(Original post by jojo1995)
In benzene, why are carbons 2,4 and 6 more susceptible to electrophillic substitution?
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I'm not quite sure what you mean by that, can you number the carbons on a benzene ring if it doesn't have a functional group?
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langlitz
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(Original post by jojo1995)
In benzene, why are carbons 2,4 and 6 more susceptible to electrophillic substitution?
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Only if there is an electron donating group or a halogen on the ring already... Benzene itself (as said above) cannot be numbered
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charliebe2
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(Original post by langlitz)
Only if there is an electron donating group or a halogen on the ring already... Benzene itself (as said above) cannot be numbered

Yeah, you only number when you have a relevant functional group, a good example of which would be phenol. I'm assuming that 2,4,6 become the most likely locations for substitutions as they will provide the most stable configuration.
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langlitz
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(Original post by charliebe2)
Yeah, you only number when you have a relevant functional group, a good example of which would be phenol. I'm assuming that 2,4,6 become the most likely locations for substitutions as they will provide the most stable configuration.
(Original post by jojo1995)
In benzene, why are carbons 2,4 and 6 more susceptible to electrophillic substitution?
thanks
It's because of the of the increased stability of the transition state in these positions for a electron donating group (more resonance structures). Anything which can stabilise this carbocation will lower the energy of the transition state
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Pigster
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My guess is that the OP meant phenol rather than benzene.
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jojo1995
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Thanks so much guys, yeah sorry i meant phenol
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