Is postgraduate life all doom and gloom? Watch

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The Wavefunction
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I've seen a lot of threads recently talking about how people are hating life after graduation, and when I'm working my but off for my degree, it's a little disheartening.
Anyone have any positive stories post graduation? (Anyone doing a chemistry degree, would love to hear from you in particular!)
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The Wavefunction
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Gonna assume y'all out there partying, travelling, and having the time of your lives etc and don't have time to reply
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EmEmTheFairy
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I think it's what you make it. I haven't graduated (heck, I don't even start my degree until October. Mature student, so don't worry about me being a little tyke who can't give you worthy advice ). My boyfriend is due to graduate this year, however, most of his friends graduated last year as their degree did not include a placement year. And so, I will use them as an example.

Person 1: Whilst on their degree, they too did a placement part-time and after graduating, managed to get a full-time job with their placement employer. Still there today, the job offers little to climb up on, is a GCSE entry-level kind of job, low salary for someone with a degree and is pretty much sucking the life out of them. They can't leave because they have rent to pay, but can't be bothered to find a different job because it's too much effort. They have finally decided it's time to find something else, as this job really is not going anywhere.

Person 2: Graduated almost two years ago (one year before person 1), and has had two jobs. First job wasn't particularly great, and so Person 2 was delighted when they got a new job. Working as a teaching assistant Person 2 hated it, but they have just been offered a promotion to teacher and the opportunity to do their teacher training for free. So, Person 2 is now very happy, as despite having to put up with a few potholes here and there something good has eventually come out of it. Person 1 and Person 2 are actually a couple, and so Person 1 feels a lot less confident about their current job scenario as Person 2 will become the breadwinner in their household.

It really depends. If you look for something interesting, set a goal, know what you want to do - it's easy to be on a happy-sad roller-coaster. Some of my boyfriend's other friends have decided to do things completely against their degree, again low entry-level jobs, so they can save up and go travelling. Point is, is that if you waltz out of uni believing it will be boring, unsatisfying, and don't have much job prospects to go at, then I guess the idea of graduating will be daunting. But if you know what you want to do, are keen to do it and have a healthy lifestyle/social life going on, I don't see why you should hate your life. It's too short to hate.
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EmEmTheFairy
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Additionally, there's always the option of strapping yourself in and doing another degree! Or a post grad, masters, PGCE, top up course. Anything to keep you there, if you really, really feel it's necessary to avoid the demons of graduation (otherwise known as the hat and gown).
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Juichiro
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(Original post by EmEmTheFairy)
Additionally, there's always the option of strapping yourself in and doing another degree! Or a post grad, masters, PGCE, top up course. Anything to keep you there, if you really, really feel it's necessary to avoid the demons of graduation (otherwise known as the hat and gown).
Who has the money to pay 9K yearly for 3 years?
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EmEmTheFairy
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(Original post by Juichiro)
Who has the money to pay 9K yearly for 3 years?
You'd be surprised. Some people are fortunate enough to fall into the 'mummy and daddy' bank of funding. Others can get more so 'proper' funding, or opt to do a free degree such as an NHS degree, like nursing.

Additionally, not all uni's ask for a fee of £9k. The uni is my town asks for a yearly rate of £5k. Still expensive, but less than the £9k.
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Juichiro
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(Original post by EmEmTheFairy)
You'd be surprised. Some people are fortunate enough to fall into the 'mummy and daddy' bank of funding. Others can get more so 'proper' funding, or opt to do a free degree such as an NHS degree, like nursing.

Additionally, not all uni's ask for a fee of £9k. The uni is my town asks for a yearly rate of £5k. Still expensive, but less than the £9k.
What do you mean by "proper funding"? 'Free' degrees are only a few (namely, nursing and medicine).
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EmEmTheFairy
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(Original post by Juichiro)
What do you mean by "proper funding"? 'Free' degrees are only a few (namely, nursing and medicine).
Someone being offered a teaching degree and teacher training by a school or being chosen for PhD funding and scholarships, many universities offer these. Yes, there may be a few, but they still exist and are of course an option.
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Viva Emptiness
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It's not that bad as long as you have realistic expectations. I imagine most graduates that are unhappy with where they are in life are so because they had unrealistic aims.

The propagation of frankly ridiculous ideas that "you're a failure if you're on £20k after graduating" and "I plan on earning £50k straight out of uni rising to £80k in three years" cannot be helping.

I guess the key is to be prepared upon graduation e.g having done some relevant part-time work or work experience/placements. Do some preliminary job search before you even finish your course - I had my graduate job lined up before I even took my finals (which was good seeing as I didn't even take me finals that Summer as planned but still had a job to go to).

(Original post by BenLynch9)
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The Wavefunction
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(Original post by Viva Emptiness)
It's not that bad as long as you have realistic expectations. I imagine most graduates that are unhappy with where they are in life are so because they had unrealistic aims.

The propagation of frankly ridiculous ideas that "you're a failure if you're on £20k after graduating" and "I plan on earning £50k straight out of uni rising to £80k in three years" cannot be helping.

I guess the key is to be prepared upon graduation e.g having done some relevant part-time work or work experience/placements. Do some preliminary job search before you even finish your course - I had my graduate job lined up before I even took my finals (which was good seeing as I didn't even take me finals that Summer as planned but still had a job to go to).
Thanks! The more I research the more I'm starting to realise that as good as it is to have a degree, experince is equally important. Fortunately I'm just coming towards the end off first year so still have time
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ChaoticButterfly
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It;s not the money thing that bothers me. It;s the doing something I hate over and over with no real brakes until you retire. Then once you retire you can start contemplating when you are going to get ill and die :indiff:

I've never enjoyed anything I have done really, but at least in education you get brakes to look forward to.
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Viva Emptiness
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
It;s not the money thing that bothers me. It;s the doing something I hate over and over with no real brakes until you retire. Then once you retire you can start contemplating when you are going to get ill and die :indiff:

I've never enjoyed anything I have done really, but at least in education you get brakes to look forward to.
So, it's not the money that bothers you...it's life.

/depressing.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Viva Emptiness)
So, it's not the money that bothers you...it's life.

/depressing.
Yes. It's probbaly why I am so left wing. I hate the whole freaking system :mad:

I would taker being paid 18k to do what I am going to be doing tomorrow (doing path maintenance in the countryside) than being some drone stuck in some horrible tedious office job that gets paid double.

Also my generation will probably die before they retire anyway
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pakhtungem
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(Original post by Viva Emptiness)
It's not that bad as long as you have realistic expectations. I imagine most graduates that are unhappy with where they are in life are so because they had unrealistic aims.

The propagation of frankly ridiculous ideas that "you're a failure if you're on £20k after graduating" and "I plan on earning £50k straight out of uni rising to £80k in three years" cannot be helping.

I guess the key is to be prepared upon graduation e.g having done some relevant part-time work or work experience/placements. Do some preliminary job search before you even finish your course - I had my graduate job lined up before I even took my finals (which was good seeing as I didn't even take me finals that Summer as planned but still had a job to go to).
What would realistic expectations be?

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pakhtungem
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
Yes. It's probbaly why I am so left wing. I hate the whole freaking system :mad:

I would taker being paid 18k to do what I am going to be doing tomorrow (doing path maintenance in the countryside) than being some drone stuck in some horrible tedious office job that gets paid double.

Also my generation will probably die before they retire anyway
What makes you think everyone will die?

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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by pakhtungem)
What makes you think everyone will die?

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The wonders of trickle down economics means I can retire at 70. :borat:
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Viva Emptiness
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(Original post by pakhtungem)
What would realistic expectations be?

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Depends on what you graduate in but I'd say £20-22k would be a perfectly respectable starting salary. That's when you even find a job - many graduates are forced to move back home with their parents and do retail or bar work until they can find something they actually want to pursue for a career.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by pakhtungem)
What would realistic expectations be?

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It's reasonable to expect between 18-25k for starting off in a grad job. That's what it tends to be like for science grads anyway. If you fail to get a grad job then hello min wage box factory and living with your parents.

Some pay higher, like if I had done a vacuum physics focused masters degree I could have been looking at a 30k engineering job due to short supply of anyone with experience in vacuum physics/engineering :facepalm:
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pakhtungem
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
The wonders of trickle down economics means I can retire at 70. :borat:
Sorry I don't understand...

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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by pakhtungem)
Sorry I don't understand...

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If things carry on as they are the younger generations will find it hard to own a house and/or retire at a sensible age. Supposedly. Thankfully I chose to be born to middleclass parents who own their house so I will inherit that when they inevitably pop their clogs, which can go towards retirement.
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