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Career Options for a Psychology/Criminology Student? watch

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    So I'm currently just about to finish my undergraduate degree in BSc Psychology with Criminology and I'm hoping to get a 2:1. I've decided that, after graduation, I'm going to volunteer/work in a number of different roles to see what suits me and what I'd like to pursue as a career.

    Right now I'm not sure what I want to do, so I'm hoping that working in different roles will give me a taste for what route I'd like to go down. Also, a bit of experience won't hurt when applying for a particular job anyway!

    Can anyone give me any advice for any careers I should look into? Here's a list of some of the jobs I'm interested in but not 100% on:

    - Forensic psychologist (This was my dream for so long, but I think that I need some experience in prisons/with offenders to know whether or not the job would be right for me. Mainly worried about whether I could deal with talking to serious offenders such as rapists and murderers, even though I'm fine reading about them now - much different in person I'm sure!)
    - Educational psychologist (Or something to do with child development?)
    - Psychotherapist
    - Mental health nurse
    - Psychiatrist (But I know I can't do this without a degree in medicine!)
    - Social worker (But I don't think I'd like dealing with adolescents; I'm more interested in children)
    - Psychology teacher in further education (Don't think I'd be very good at this though)
    - Probation officer
    - Midwife (I'm aware I can't do this with my degree though, and that it's more about dealing with mothers rather than babies)
    - Counselling psychologist
    - Working in a nursery/playgroup?

    There's probably a lot more that I could add to this list. Basically, I'm interested in anything forensic/children/mental health/psychology. I'm more than happy to do more courses but I don't want to be in education for too much longer!

    I just need some inspiration! Please let me know any advice you have of any careers you can think of that I might be interested in, or any advice for the careers listed above. I need some sense of direction!

    Any help will be GREATLY appreciated!!

    Thank you!
    Jess
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    Well for nursing you need a nursing degree I think... Have you considered the non-profit sector as well because that's an option too 😊 I just wanted to wish you good luck and let me know how it goes. I am looking to do joint honours Psych & Crim but not
    too sure what I want to do careers wise... Also, how about the police force?


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    (Original post by jessicalucy)
    So I'm currently just about to finish my undergraduate degree in BSc Psychology with Criminology and I'm hoping to get a 2:1. I've decided that, after graduation, I'm going to volunteer/work in a number of different roles to see what suits me and what I'd like to pursue as a career.

    Right now I'm not sure what I want to do, so I'm hoping that working in different roles will give me a taste for what route I'd like to go down. Also, a bit of experience won't hurt when applying for a particular job anyway!

    Can anyone give me any advice for any careers I should look into? Here's a list of some of the jobs I'm interested in but not 100% on:

    - Forensic psychologist (This was my dream for so long, but I think that I need some experience in prisons/with offenders to know whether or not the job would be right for me. Mainly worried about whether I could deal with talking to serious offenders such as rapists and murderers, even though I'm fine reading about them now - much different in person I'm sure!)
    - Educational psychologist (Or something to do with child development?)
    - Psychotherapist
    - Mental health nurse
    - Psychiatrist (But I know I can't do this without a degree in medicine!)
    - Social worker (But I don't think I'd like dealing with adolescents; I'm more interested in children)
    - Psychology teacher in further education (Don't think I'd be very good at this though)
    - Probation officer
    - Midwife (I'm aware I can't do this with my degree though, and that it's more about dealing with mothers rather than babies)
    - Counselling psychologist
    - Working in a nursery/playgroup?

    There's probably a lot more that I could add to this list. Basically, I'm interested in anything forensic/children/mental health/psychology. I'm more than happy to do more courses but I don't want to be in education for too much longer!

    I just need some inspiration! Please let me know any advice you have of any careers you can think of that I might be interested in, or any advice for the careers listed above. I need some sense of direction!

    Any help will be GREATLY appreciated!!

    Thank you!
    Jess
    Hey Jess. You're gonna have to try and narrow this down to a couple I feel. Each one of those is very different.

    The best way to realise what you will like is voluntary experience. For instance, I want to do medicine via my first degree in psychology, but currently battling with the reality of the harshness of it and coming to terms with mortality and all the horrible things that can happen to the body. Experience opens up cravats that you would perhaps otherwise not consider.

    If you had to choose 3, which would those be and why?

    Josh
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    (Original post by FindingHappiness)
    Well for nursing you need a nursing degree I think... Have you considered the non-profit sector as well because that's an option too ������ I just wanted to wish you good luck and let me know how it goes. I am looking to do joint honours Psych & Crim but not
    too sure what I want to do careers wise... Also, how about the police force?


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    Aye. Some of my mates have gone into nursing via a sort of graduate entry masters course. Nursing in all of its forms is a great applied profession with great room for self-improvement and seemingly is very satisfying - but very challenging.
    Police sounds great - fits in very well with the degree, and again can make a brilliant career out of...
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    Hi,

    I'm a psych grad who went into medicine. Currently on placement in a forensic psychiatry department working in prisons, alongside forensic psychiatrists, nurses and forensic psychologists. I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have about the field



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    Psychiatric drugs/'medictaions' are brain damaging. They have destroyed my brain in ways that are impossible to describe.

    Should you chose to be a psychiatrist please bear this in mind. As you will be taught the opposite. Read Peter Breggin or Joanna Moncrieffe.
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    (Original post by FindingHappiness)
    Well for nursing you need a nursing degree I think... Have you considered the non-profit sector as well because that's an option too I just wanted to wish you good luck and let me know how it goes. I am looking to do joint honours Psych & Crim but not too sure what I want to do careers wise... Also, how about the police force?
    Hello! Yeah for nursing I'd need to do a nursing course for 2 years (I wouldn't have to do the full 3 years due to already having a degree in Psychology). I was looking at mental health charities, so that's definitely another option. Regarding working in the police force - I haven't really thought about this as I'm not sure how it all works... do you have any idea about what jobs there are within the force and what qualifications you'd need? Thank you for all your help and advice!


    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Hey Jess. You're gonna have to try and narrow this down to a couple I feel. Each one of those is very different.

    The best way to realise what you will like is voluntary experience. For instance, I want to do medicine via my first degree in psychology, but currently battling with the reality of the harshness of it and coming to terms with mortality and all the horrible things that can happen to the body. Experience opens up cravats that you would perhaps otherwise not consider.

    If you had to choose 3, which would those be and why?
    Thanks for your comment Josh! This is exactly why I'm a bit apprehensive about a career as a forensic psychologist or anything similar - because of potentially having to face extremely dangerous offenders and hearing about their grizzly stories first-hand. As I mentioned in my first post - I'm more than happy to watch documentaries and read books about these types of people, but I obviously have no idea what it'll be like working alongside them. Right now it sounds really interesting and perfect for me, but I need some experience in prisons etc. before I start a Masters degree to become a forensic psychologist (for example). This is why, once I finish my current degree, I'm going to be volunteering in a number of different places to see if different jobs are right for me. But it's good to know that other people are in similar positions to me!

    To answer your question, if I had to choose 3 career options, they would be:
    - Forensic psychologist: Because I've wanted to be this since I was about 14 years old due to my huge interest in the area. I love my forensic psychology module on my degree right now, and I think it would be an extremely interesting job.
    - Further education psychology teacher: Because my interest in psychology started at A Level and I think I'd love teaching the content. I'm very organised so I think that would suit the job.
    - Mental health nurse: Because I'd be interested in learning more about mental illnesses and I'd like to help people suffering from them.

    (However all of these still don't sit 100% right with me :/ I feel like there's a job out there that I don't know about yet, and when I know about it it'll be perfect for me! Silly I know - maybe I just don't want to commit to something yet??)


    (Original post by Sinatrafan)
    I'm a psych grad who went into medicine. Currently on placement in a forensic psychiatry department working in prisons, alongside forensic psychiatrists, nurses and forensic psychologists. I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have about the field
    Hello! Wow, it all sounds very interesting! What qualifications did you need to get to where you are now? What are you hoping to do in the future? And what's an average day like at your job? Thank you!
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    I wouldn't worry about your feelings toward working with offenders. Whilst in principle it sounds morally difficult, the reality is far easier to deal with.

    In forensic psychology a lot of the people you work with are people who are mentally unwell, and may have committed their offence due to being unwell. This certainly dilutes down any malice you feel toward them as they become patients rather than criminals.

    The next thing is the difference between a piece of paper and the person in front of you. You don't see the person for their crime, you see them for the individual in front of you. Actually you can form good relationships with offenders and their crime seems somewhat distant from the reality in front of you; they can be genuinely nice people. You see them for who they are and not what they've done.

    Finally very few criminals are genuinely psychopathic merciless criminals doing it for a laugh. People commit their crimes for many understandable reasons e.g. being unwell, self defence, revenge, intoxication, needing money, terrible social circumstances and life events etc. Whilst this of course does not vindicate what they did, it allows you a degree of understanding which in turn can soften your opinion of them.

    Of course you will meet genuinely nasty people who have done dreadful crimes for poor reasons, but they are very much the minority. Then it is simply a matter of being a professional and doing your job, regardless of your personal feelings.

    In terms of myself, I qualify as a doctor next year and am currently doing my elective. This is a 6 week period where we can do anything we like (medically related) anywhere in the world. My day consists of;

    Going to jail and assessing patients
    Seeing patients on the ward at the secure hospital I'm based at
    Seeing outpatients who have been discharged from the hospital and are now in the community i.e. visiting them in their homes
    Attending the multidisciplinary team meetings
    Attending the teaching and academic programs they put on at the hospital

    I did a BSc an MSc and am now obviously doing my MBChB, but a standard psychology BSc is enough to qualify someone for a graduate entry medicine program. Medicine obviously opens up over 70 careers and you can become anything from a GP to a surgeon. I'm interested in pursuing psychiatry as a career although I haven't fully made up my mind.

    Forensic psychology is a great career but, as with all professional psychology jobs, is dreadfully competitive to get on to. Medicine is also competitive to get in to, but forensic psychiatry is a far easier career (psychiatry is massively undersubscribed) to get in to once you overcome the hurdle of getting into medicine. It also has far better job security, is better paid and is generally a more senior position within the forensic team (made up of OTs, nurses, psychologists, social workers, support workers, doctors etc).

    Sadly due to the delicate and secure nature of the field it is often difficult to get direct work experience in the service unless you are a medical student. I was discussing this with the consultant forensic psychiatrist who is supervising me. He says that you have to go through far more hurdles in terms of trust permission if you are non-medical.

    In lieu of that difficulty I'm happy to answer any other questions you have about forensic services, the roles of doctors and psychologists etc. Hope that helped.
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    (Original post by Sinatrafan)
    I wouldn't worry about your feelings toward working with offenders. Whilst in principle it sounds morally difficult, the reality is far easier to deal with.

    In forensic psychology a lot of the people you work with are people who are mentally unwell, and may have committed their offence due to being unwell. This certainly dilutes down any malice you feel toward them as they become patients rather than criminals.

    The next thing is the difference between a piece of paper and the person in front of you. You don't see the person for their crime, you see them for the individual in front of you. Actually you can form good relationships with offenders and their crime seems somewhat distant from the reality in front of you; they can be genuinely nice people. You see them for who they are and not what they've done.

    Finally very few criminals are genuinely psychopathic merciless criminals doing it for a laugh. People commit their crimes for many understandable reasons e.g. being unwell, self defence, revenge, intoxication, needing money, terrible social circumstances and life events etc. Whilst this of course does not vindicate what they did, it allows you a degree of understanding which in turn can soften your opinion of them.

    Of course you will meet genuinely nasty people who have done dreadful crimes for poor reasons, but they are very much the minority. Then it is simply a matter of being a professional and doing your job, regardless of your personal feelings.

    In terms of myself, I qualify as a doctor next year and am currently doing my elective. This is a 6 week period where we can do anything we like (medically related) anywhere in the world. My day consists of;

    Going to jail and assessing patients
    Seeing patients on the ward at the secure hospital I'm based at
    Seeing outpatients who have been discharged from the hospital and are now in the community i.e. visiting them in their homes
    Attending the multidisciplinary team meetings
    Attending the teaching and academic programs they put on at the hospital

    I did a BSc an MSc and am now obviously doing my MBChB, but a standard psychology BSc is enough to qualify someone for a graduate entry medicine program. Medicine obviously opens up over 70 careers and you can become anything from a GP to a surgeon. I'm interested in pursuing psychiatry as a career although I haven't fully made up my mind.

    Forensic psychology is a great career but, as with all professional psychology jobs, is dreadfully competitive to get on to. Medicine is also competitive to get in to, but forensic psychiatry is a far easier career (psychiatry is massively undersubscribed) to get in to once you overcome the hurdle of getting into medicine. It also has far better job security, is better paid and is generally a more senior position within the forensic team (made up of OTs, nurses, psychologists, social workers, support workers, doctors etc).

    Sadly due to the delicate and secure nature of the field it is often difficult to get direct work experience in the service unless you are a medical student. I was discussing this with the consultant forensic psychiatrist who is supervising me. He says that you have to go through far more hurdles in terms of trust permission if you are non-medical.

    In lieu of that difficulty I'm happy to answer any other questions you have about forensic services, the roles of doctors and psychologists etc. Hope that helped.
    Wow that was so helpful! Thank you!!

    Can I ask what you did your BSc and MSc in? & Where? & What did you do for work experience/volunteering? Thank you again!
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    Tbh I am not quite sure. I will need to check that one out, everyone always just says the police force... That is a good question though!


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    Hey, I'm starting to think about future careers now and I'm wondering what career options could Psychology lead to if study it at university?


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    (Original post by dumb cabbage)
    Hey, I'm starting to think about future careers now and I'm wondering what career options could Psychology lead to if study it at university?


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    Anything. Almost literally. From the degree only in itself, you will rely mostly on work experience and volunteering to get employment. Both a huge strength and weakness imo.

    All psychological fields, marketing, HR and PR, teaching at all levels, other related science fields (biology, physiology), is good for management progression. You can convert to medicine or law. Do post-graduate in any of the psychology or broader health related fields.
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    (Original post by jessicalucy)
    Wow that was so helpful! Thank you!!

    Can I ask what you did your BSc and MSc in? & Where? & What did you do for work experience/volunteering? Thank you again!
    My pleasure. My degrees were in psychology and neuroscience down in London. My work experience was varied but consisted of shadowing doctors in hospitals (4 weeks total) plus some other volunteering type roles.
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    Hi. I'm going to start my undergraduate degree in Psychology and Criminology. Any ideas to what I can do after I eventually graduate. I was originally looking at Forensic Psychology myself
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    I want to be a forensic psychologist after education for my undergrad i am doing a bsc joint honours in psychology and criminology my question is do I need to do a masters and phd then have work experience??
    and how likely am I able to get a job within the criminal justice sector being a forensic psychologis? Thank you x
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    Hello Sinatrafan my name is Nereciah a student currently doing my final next year in Criminology and Psychology. I would like to know exactly how did you go into medicine and what is it that you do in the prisons. Please kindly elaborate further with details. I am interested!Thank you in advance
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    (Original post by Sinatrafan)
    Hi,

    I'm a psych grad who went into medicine. Currently on placement in a forensic psychiatry department working in prisons, alongside forensic psychiatrists, nurses and forensic psychologists. I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have about the field



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    Do you have any idea since your involved in this field what sort of employment options you would have with a Diploma of Higher Education in Criminology and Psychology??
 
 
 
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