oscaranderson
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Hi

For the Social Learning Theory explanation, I have read about Bandura's idea of mental representations, but I didn't quite get it.
What is a mental representation in terms of aggressive behaviour? Could someone explain this to me?

Thanks.
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Kay101xoxo
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Bandura claimed that this must take place in order for social learning to be effective. It is basically when a child creates a mental representation in their head (imagine a scene of events) in their social environment along with the possible rewards or punishments linked to them. Therefore, if an opportunity arises in the future, the child will use their learned behaviour (which is the aggression) as long as the reward outcomes outweigh the punishments. Hope that helped xx
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oscaranderson
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(Original post by Kay101xoxo)
Bandura claimed that this must take place in order for social learning to be effective. It is basically when a child creates a mental representation in their head (imagine a scene of events) in their social environment along with the possible rewards or punishments linked to them. Therefore, if an opportunity arises in the future, the child will use their learned behaviour (which is the aggression) as long as the reward outcomes outweigh the punishments. Hope that helped xx
Right, I'm still a little unsure, but here's what I think I understand so I can be corrected:
A mental representation is like a schema - its like an idea of how beneficial/detrimental aggressive behaviour could be, built up from past experiences/observations? So children learn aggression through social learning, form a mental representation from this process of observing others, which then shapes their decision of whether they will behave aggressively in other social situations?

I'm fairly sure this is wrong, but could someone explain this more to me and correct my current understanding??
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shaunawinfield
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i know this isn't to do with slt, but i'm just wondering, with institutional aggression, do we have to know 2 types or is it okay if we just learn one? the spec doesn't specify, but our teacher gave us notes on prisons and education, in the cara flanagan its prisons and genocide, but in an ideal 24 mark answer, theres only prisons?!?!?!?! i'm so confused
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flyingraccoon
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(Original post by shaunawinfield)
i know this isn't to do with slt, but i'm just wondering, with institutional aggression, do we have to know 2 types or is it okay if we just learn one? the spec doesn't specify, but our teacher gave us notes on prisons and education, in the cara flanagan its prisons and genocide, but in an ideal 24 mark answer, theres only prisons?!?!?!?! i'm so confused
With institutional aggression we learnt about the importation and deprivation models (bringing aggression into prisons and aggression being caused by prison factors). It makes the 8 marks of A01 easier but AQA will never specifically ask you about one type of institutional aggression. We only covered prisons as well. If you can write a 24mark essay using the stuff you know don't worry about what an ideal answer suggests you put.
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