Why are Group 1 metals more reactive as you go down but Halogens are the opposite?

Watch this thread
Ben Johnson
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
I'm confused:confused:. I meant down the periodic table.
0
reply
zak7399
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
(Original post by Ben Johnson)
I'm confused:confused:. I meant down the periodic table.
Hi its to do with the position of the electrons on the shells. As you go down group 1 the electrons become further away from the nucleus so there is less attraction , meaning electrons are lost more easily ; its the other way round for halogens.
0
reply
langlitz
Badges: 17
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by zak7399)
Hi its to do with the position of the electrons on the shells. As you go down group 1 the electrons become further away from the nucleus so there is less attraction , meaning electrons are lost more easily ; its the other way round for halogens.
(Original post by Ben Johnson)
I'm confused:confused:. I meant down the periodic table.
The decrease in reactivity of the halogens is more to do with the decrease in electronegativity down the group. Fluorine is the most electronegative element so it can rip electrons of almost anything making it very reactive
0
reply
Ben Johnson
Badges: 2
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by langlitz)
The decrease in reactivity of the halogens is more to do with the decrease in electronegativity down the group. Fluorine is the most electronegative element so it can rip electrons of almost anything making it very reactive
Thanks. So will all non-metals (except for noble gases of course) be less reactive as you go down the table or just the halogens?
0
reply
langlitz
Badges: 17
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by Ben Johnson)
Thanks. So will all non-metals (except for noble gases of course) be less reactive as you go down the table or just the halogens?
That's not necessarily true, there are other factors which will have an effect. But in general yes you could say that
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA A-level Psychology Paper 1 go?

Loved the paper - Feeling positive (233)
41.98%
The paper was reasonable (235)
42.34%
Not feeling great about that exam... (51)
9.19%
It was TERRIBLE (36)
6.49%

Watched Threads

View All