Safe seats - does my vote matter? Watch

amyc123
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Both my term time and home addresses are in constituencies that are classed as 'safe' for the Lib Dems and Conservatives respectively. Lib Dems have a 55k majority in my uni constituency and the Tories have a 74k majority in the home constituency.

Does my vote matter? And where am I better off voting?
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Mad Vlad
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(Original post by amyc123)
Both my term time and home addresses are in constituencies that are classed as 'safe' for the Lib Dems and Conservatives respectively. Lib Dems have a 55k majority in my uni constituency and the Tories have a 74k majority in the home constituency.

Does my vote matter? And where am I better off voting?
Yes, it matters, but in a very very small way.

On the basis that if you're raising this point RE: Lib Dems and Conservatives, you intend to vote for one of the 3 joke parties, you may as well vote in your term-time constituency as this has the greatest chance of your vote actually having any sway.
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amyc123
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(Original post by Mad Vlad)
Yes, it matters, but in a very very small way.

On the basis that if you're raising this point RE: Lib Dems and Conservatives, you intend to vote for one of the 3 joke parties, you may as well vote in your term-time constituency as this has the greatest chance of your vote actually having any sway.
I don't wish to vote Lib Dem or Conservative, not sure how they are joke parties though.
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Genocidal
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No, your vote doesn't matter. Don't let the adverts kid you. Those are massive majorities and are highly unlikely to change significantly.
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MagicNMedicine
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Is 55k majority really safe for the Lib Dems, lol
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Mad Vlad
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(Original post by amyc123)
I don't wish to vote Lib Dem or Conservative, not sure how they are joke parties though.
My point exactly. I was suggesting that you were intending to vote for one of the joke parties; UKIP, Green or Labour.
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Mad Vlad
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(Original post by MagicNMedicine)
Is 55k majority really safe for the Lib Dems, lol
Not in a student constituency, for sure.
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the bear
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(Original post by amyc123)
Both my term time and home addresses are in constituencies that are classed as 'safe' for the Lib Dems and Conservatives respectively. Lib Dems have a 55k majority in my uni constituency and the Tories have a 74k majority in the home constituency.

Does my vote matter? And where am I better off voting?
the concept of a "safe seat" is wholly mythical. seats do not vote for themselves. the majorities are also only valid on the day the votes were cast. this election is going to throw up some huge surprises.
vote wherever you prefer, but do vote !
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babamoon90
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We usually get sway at 0-10% on average, so if a seat if very safe it is highly unlikely to lose. You have to remember the same people live in an area and not a lot will move in and out over 5 years. So if you voted conservative in 2005 and 2010, it's pretty likely you will vote conservative in 2015.

I feel its the middle class that always decides the elections. The chavs will vote for labour, the toffs will vote for the conservatives. It's the people in the middle who will decide the vote.
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Smithy-Smiths
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Your vote does matter and let me explain to you why:

Firstly, this General Election has more political uncertainty than any of the elections we have previously seen. 'Safe seats' are fast becoming a myth, with the rise of small parties including the likes of the SNP, UKIP, Lib Dems and the Greens. The safe seat for the Lib Dems probably isn't that safe anymore seeing as we students, still haven't forgotten the tuition fees betrayal... so if you were to vote, I would recommend voting there.

Secondly, considering the uncertainty in this election, your vote counts more than ever seeing as all indicators suggest another coalition on May 7th. So if you decide not to vote for the two major parties, it is extremely important that you vote for the party that you would least mind being in coalition with either the Conservatives or Labour.

Thirdly, when assessing the majority of all Government policies over the course of these five years, we can see how the majority of the policies implemented have favoured the elderly... With almost next to none of the policies introduced largely affecting students. Why? Because all of the leading parties are only going to tailor their policies to help groups who are most prominent in the electorate, in this case the elderly.

When young people decide to abstain from voting or become politically apathetic, they fail to realise that the only people who are affected by such decisions are the young themselves. Because parties are not going to create schemes to help groups who don't even vote.

I, like many young people grow incredibly frustrated that I just miss the age to vote in this election... and thus am imploring as many young people as I can to vote so that our age group can finally be counted amongst the electorate demographic and can start to have more schemes in our favour.

I hope I've put forward a strong enough argument to convince you to vote.
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amyc123
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(Original post by Smithy-Smiths)
Your vote does matter and let me explain to you why:

Firstly, this General Election has more political uncertainty than any of the elections we have previously seen. 'Safe seats' are fast becoming a myth, with the rise of small parties including the likes of the SNP, UKIP, Lib Dems and the Greens. The safe seat for the Lib Dems probably isn't that safe anymore seeing as we students, still haven't forgotten the tuition fees betrayal... so if you were to vote, I would recommend voting there.

Secondly, considering the uncertainty in this election, your vote counts more than ever seeing as all indicators suggest another coalition on May 7th. So if you decide not to vote for the two major parties, it is extremely important that you vote for the party that you would least mind being in coalition with either the Conservatives or Labour.

Thirdly, when assessing the majority of all Government policies over the course of these five years, we can see how the majority of the policies implemented have favoured the elderly... With almost next to none of the policies introduced largely affecting students. Why? Because all of the leading parties are only going to tailor their policies to help groups who are most prominent in the electorate, in this case the elderly.

When young people decide to abstain from voting or become politically apathetic, they fail to realise that the only people who are affected by such decisions are the young themselves. Because parties are not going to create schemes to help groups who don't even vote.

I, like many young people grow incredibly frustrated that I just miss the age to vote in this election... and thus am imploring and as many young people as I can to vote so that our age group can finally be counted amongst the electorate demographic and can start to have more schemes in our favour.

I hope I've put forward a strong enough argument to convince you to vote.
Thanks for your reply I never intended not to vote, especially as women fought long and hard for it.

I understand that young people need to vote, and at 21, this will be my first vote in a general election. I don't want this vote to be wasted by voting at home where it will most like end up Conservative again. I'm pretty sure I'll be voting in my uni constituency as, like you say, the Lib Dems are not at all popular with students.

Sorry that you can't vote in this one, keep encouraging people to vote!
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Smithy-Smiths
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(Original post by amyc123)
Thanks for your reply I never intended not to vote, especially as women fought long and hard for it.

I understand that young people need to vote, and at 21, this will be my first vote in a general election. I don't want this vote to be wasted by voting at home where it will most like end up Conservative again. I'm pretty sure I'll be voting in my uni constituency as, like you say, the Lib Dems are not at all popular with students.

Sorry that you can't vote in this one, keep encouraging people to vote!
I will do; I'm glad to hear it! Good luck and if you don't mind me asking: which political party do you intend to vote for?
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username1221160
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(Original post by amyc123)
Both my term time and home addresses are in constituencies that are classed as 'safe' for the Lib Dems and Conservatives respectively. Lib Dems have a 55k majority in my uni constituency and the Tories have a 74k majority in the home constituency.

Does my vote matter? And where am I better off voting?
Are the 55k and 74k not percentages? I'm not sure any constituency has a 74k population.


I moved from a contested seat to a safe seat and have been really shocked by the lack of political campaigning. As of yet, I have had no letters through my letterbox, seen no campaigners with their rosettes and had no one knock on my door. There is little point in me voting, although I will out of obligation.

There are too many seats where Labour or the Tories can parachute in a one legged donkey and it would still get voted in. Unfortunately it is a consequence of the first past the post system. As the largest parties have the most to lose from electoral reform, they are the most resistant to changing it.
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sdotd
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no
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amyc123
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(Original post by Smithy-Smiths)
I will do; I'm glad to hear it! Good luck and if you don't mind me asking: which political party do you intend to vote for?
Quick answer: I haven't decided yet but most likely whoever will protect the NHS, I work for it and my grandparents rely on it. I couldn't vote for an anti-NHS party.

Who would you vote for?
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William Pitt
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(Original post by amyc123)
Both my term time and home addresses are in constituencies that are classed as 'safe' for the Lib Dems and Conservatives respectively. Lib Dems have a 55k majority in my uni constituency and the Tories have a 74k majority in the home constituency.

Does my vote matter? And where am I better off voting?
No it does not really matter unless you make it matter. You live in a quite wealthy constituency, I imagine, full of middle class people. You can persuade others by starting a campaign or a local social movement to vote for another party. This happened in Brighton (Green) and Kent (UKIP).

Hampstead is a very wealthy area of London which votes Labour, as do many North London intellectuals.

You can make it happen, just not by yourself.
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